rotting zombies

Topics regarding the study of zombie behavior and physiology. Know your enemy.

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

Post Reply
surv
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2013 4:51 pm

rotting zombies

Post by surv » Sun Jul 21, 2013 6:27 pm

so i live in Florida and in the summer it gets up to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. and i got me thinking that if a zombie apocalypse ever actually happened then wouldn't the zombies rot in the sun? they're already rotting in the first place, but wouldn't the heat make them rot even faster? and wouldn't the zombies eventually just lose all of their flesh? if they did that would incapacitate them correct? i 'm new to zombie biology, but it's just a theory

User avatar
Drop Dead Zed
*
Posts: 70
Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 2:00 pm

Re: rotting zombies

Post by Drop Dead Zed » Sun Jul 21, 2013 9:06 pm

There is a reason why in many fantasy literature/game settings necromancers, vampire, zombies, and other undead stick to cold climates and use freezing magic.

Of course true freezing temps create separate issues for creatures that are exothermic.
There are two kinds of people in this world. Those that believe in the Moon Landing and those that don't.

User avatar
azrael99
* * * * *
Posts: 2371
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 7:55 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: night of the living dead, 28 days later, Zombieland, World war Z (when it gonna be out)
Location: Saguenay,Quebec Canada

Re: rotting zombies

Post by azrael99 » Sun Jul 21, 2013 9:45 pm

don't forget that zombie in theory would rot slower than corpses since they do what a corpse don't : they moves,

a dead body usually is laying on the ground and is inert, which make it quite a easy feast to insect and vermin, but undead usually can move , that make it harder to insect and vermin to eat them or even be interested in them

there is also the theory that since they could be resurrected by many things they could be seeing as toxic to most living thing around, which make them not that tasty.
"We stopped to look for monster under the bed , the day we realized that they were inside us"

User avatar
Mad Mike
* * *
Posts: 511
Joined: Fri Feb 04, 2011 4:33 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: the walking dead & world war Z

Re: rotting zombies

Post by Mad Mike » Sun Jul 28, 2013 6:08 pm

azrael99 wrote:don't forget that zombie in theory would rot slower than corpses since they do what a corpse don't : they moves,

a dead body usually is laying on the ground and is inert, which make it quite a easy feast to insect and vermin, but undead usually can move , that make it harder to insect and vermin to eat them or even be interested in them

there is also the theory that since they could be resurrected by many things they could be seeing as toxic to most living thing around, which make them not that tasty.
Interesting thought - scavengers eating zombies! Then all we have to do is stand aside & let the buzzards make the world safe again :D. No need for us to risk combat - but wait! What happens to the scavengers that have consumed the zombies? :?

User avatar
maldon007
* * * * *
Posts: 4097
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2009 10:49 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Most of the older stuff, newer stuff just doesnt cut it fsr...
Location: Pickle Bucket Brigade
Contact:

Re: rotting zombies

Post by maldon007 » Sun Jul 28, 2013 9:11 pm

Pretty much been covered, but I will add- If you can accept dead bodies walking & seeking flesh, having them be unappetizing to the usual carrion consumers, for whatever reason... I mean, nearly believable reasons could be easily contrived, while reasons for walkers/biters to exist? Hard to find without suspending all reality.
Image

User avatar
paintwritedave
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 2:51 pm

Re: rotting zombies

Post by paintwritedave » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:24 am

If you're creating a scenario that has actual dead things walking around, you can pretty easily incorporate reasons why those dead things don't just rot away, or succumb to cold temperatures, etc...

User avatar
azrael99
* * * * *
Posts: 2371
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 7:55 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: night of the living dead, 28 days later, Zombieland, World war Z (when it gonna be out)
Location: Saguenay,Quebec Canada

Re: rotting zombies

Post by azrael99 » Thu Aug 08, 2013 8:45 am

i once though on how people though that the zombie would freeze during winter then come back at spring , but usually when "flesh" is frozen, ice crystal grow and then destroy living cell. that include brain stem

the only way i can see that zombie could freeze then come back is , if the Z-virus make the body produce a certain kind of protein like frog that would act as a anti-freeze.

so they could also produce a certain kind o chemical that could reduce the rotting process or make the body skeptic and non-appetizing to animals, vermin and insect .
"We stopped to look for monster under the bed , the day we realized that they were inside us"

User avatar
Mikeyboy
* * * * *
Posts: 2265
Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 8:00 am

Re: rotting zombies

Post by Mikeyboy » Thu Aug 08, 2013 9:27 am

That is why I always liked the Resident Evil #2 zombie scenario, before the RE storyline got really wacked. The zombie infection is a mutation from what was originally a man-made virus treatment to reverse aging and prevent disease/natural death in humans. The process that turns you into a zombie, and makes you move around even though you are dead, also prevents your cells from dying and rotting.


User avatar
paintwritedave
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 2:51 pm

Re: rotting zombies

Post by paintwritedave » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:07 am

It's tough for me to buy the Resident Evil idea. I mean, its fantasy, so sure, but would those infected people really be dead? It seems like they would have to have some sort of working nervous system that could communicate desires from the brain (a functioning brain) to other parts of the body. In order for them to move around, the muscles would have to be working, which means they would need nourishment, i.e. food, so the infected would have to eat... it seems like the story would devolve into a 28 Days scenario, where the infected were sick people who would just die from dehydration or lack of food.

User avatar
Mikeyboy
* * * * *
Posts: 2265
Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 8:00 am

Re: rotting zombies

Post by Mikeyboy » Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:48 am

paintwritedave wrote:It's tough for me to buy the Resident Evil idea. I mean, its fantasy, so sure, but would those infected people really be dead? It seems like they would have to have some sort of working nervous system that could communicate desires from the brain (a functioning brain) to other parts of the body. In order for them to move around, the muscles would have to be working, which means they would need nourishment, i.e. food, so the infected would have to eat... it seems like the story would devolve into a 28 Days scenario, where the infected were sick people who would just die from dehydration or lack of food.
Damn there is a line in 28 Days Later where one of the Army guys complains that the "zombies" are still alive, even though they don't eat or drink. If a zombie has the same biological weakness for need food and water as a living human, then the "rule of 3's would apply to zombies. If that is the case, then a person who is newly infected and turns into a Zombie, will die of dehydration after 3 days. Here is the funny thing though, what about Rigor Mortis?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigor_mortis" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Rigor mortis is one of the recognizable signs of death, caused by chemical changes in the muscles after death, causing the limbs of the corpse to become stiff and difficult to move or manipulate. In humans, it commences after about three to four hours, reaches maximum stiffness after 12 hours, and gradually dissipates until approximately 48 to 60 hours after death.
So technically the golden time for a Zombie would be the first few hours after infection, after that they will be stiff as a board and unable to move within 12 hours, then when rigor mortis wears off the zombie may have a few more hours of movement before it dies of dehydration. Rot would not even be a factor.

According to this article if not exposed to the elements, insects or animals it can take up to 50 years for all the flesh of a body to full decompose, and over 100 years for the bones to disappear. If food and water is not a factor, a Zombie trapped indoors could last a long time.

http://curiosity.discovery.com/question ... -decompose" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

User avatar
RugbyFire
* *
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 11:25 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 days later, planet terror
Location: Florida

Re: rotting zombies

Post by RugbyFire » Fri Aug 09, 2013 3:59 pm

It is still important to aim for the brain area of the zombie no matter if it has been in the snow or in the desert. Don't assume that it is not dangerous anymore cause it is dried up. Zombies cannot be trusted. That's how a lot of people have fallen victim to them and in return become infected themselves. These viruses and things are constantly continuing to adapt to the most cruel conditions. Remember the best shot is in the brain.
oh shit... more Zombies

Post Reply

Return to “Zombie Biology”