living without electricity

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grumpyviking
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living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Thu Nov 29, 2018 8:56 am

most people in the modern world have never had to go without electricity for any length of time, a few might have experienced a minor power cut but i'm talking about a major power shutdown for months, years, maybe for good.
in a world where everything is available at the click of a button most people would not be able to function without light, heat, cooking, hot water, no petrol or diesel-pumps are electric, no deliveries to the stores-no fuel means no deliveries.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by flybynight » Thu Nov 29, 2018 9:35 am

I've heard it stated that the smartest person to ever live, is the one who figured out how to make and use fire. Most modern humans aren't that smart.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:08 am

no they aren't, and how long can they live without? especially in winter.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Dec 05, 2018 11:47 pm

grumpyviking wrote:
Thu Nov 29, 2018 8:56 am
most people in the modern world have never had to go without electricity for any length of time, a few might have experienced a minor power cut but i'm talking about a major power shutdown for months, years, maybe for good.
in a world where everything is available at the click of a button most people would not be able to function without light, heat, cooking, hot water, no petrol or diesel-pumps are electric, no deliveries to the stores-no fuel means no deliveries.
I did a mock bug-in & loss of utilities was the scenario. Long-term....most will fail. Some may 'deserve' to & others no. I think One Second After pretty much nailed to effects of grid-down.

I just don't see me many making it long-term without medical care, sanitation, etc.

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Re: living without electricity

Post by Halfapint » Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:20 am

Without power? I don’t see that ever happening especially not now. With batteries, solar, wind, hand crank, etc..... major power like refrigerators/microwaves may be limited. But all electronics? Not going away.

Fire? Fire is stupid simple, so simple that you could spend 20 and have probably have 3 lifetimes of fire. They are call BIC lighters. There’s a reason they had to have those stupid child safety things because 3 year olds can create fire.

All that aside. Land is the thing most people wont have. You may have almost all the the knowledge in the world but if you’re living om the 12th floor in the middle of the city with no means to vent smoke you can’t have fire, you can’t cook, you can’t have heat.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:57 am

your talking about a short term loss of electricity, batteries bic lighters are all finite, they last so long then are useless, okay for minor events but I was talking about living without electricity not just waiting for the power to come back on, a long term loss of power maybe even permanent.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by Halfapint » Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:15 am

grumpyviking wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:57 am
your talking about a short term loss of electricity, batteries bic lighters are all finite, they last so long then are useless, okay for minor events but I was talking about living without electricity not just waiting for the power to come back on, a long term loss of power maybe even permanent.
Question, how many BIC lighters have you gone through? I mean actually opened, used, and completely run out of? My guess is very few, unless you are a heavy heavy smoker. In which case, congrats, cigerettes are no longer being produced. Even heavy smokers I know can’t think of the last time they actually used a full lighter.

Now think, a full BIC lighter used not to light that cigarette every couple minutes, but to light a fire every day or so? Tell me, how long does it last?

On to batteries, batteries are expendable. But I’ve had the same 3000mah battery for over 10 years. It’s an anker, it’s been used and abused. It’s been run completely more times than I can possibly count. It’s also spent the rest of the time on a charger. I have multiple 5, 10, 15, 20, 25mah batteries. I also bought multiple 6 charging port USB chargers. These will survive practically indefinitely if used properly.

Now, I’m not the sharpest man, but I know basics of batteries. And the raw materials for anyone with more than average intelligence is pretty easy to build with some basic tools..

Any who. That’s my thoughts
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Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:34 am

it dosent matter how many lighters one has or hasn't gone through, batteries too, anything like that is finite, in a long term or permanent power down and without a manufacturing base to make more.., when they run out that's it there is no more, you'll be back to rubbing sticks for a spark.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by flybynight » Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:37 am

grumpyviking wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:34 am
it dosent matter how many lighters one has or hasn't gone through, batteries too, anything like that is finite, in a long term or permanent power down and without a manufacturing base to make more.., when they run out that's it there is no more, you'll be back to rubbing sticks for a spark.
Sticks don't spark.
Every lighter I find I throw in a box and when I get time I modify them into the firestarter from Woodswalker's thread . I have about 10 done so far. Cheap insurance .

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=118377
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Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:46 am

flybynight wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:37 am
grumpyviking wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:34 am
it dosent matter how many lighters one has or hasn't gone through, batteries too, anything like that is finite, in a long term or permanent power down and without a manufacturing base to make more.., when they run out that's it there is no more, you'll be back to rubbing sticks for a spark.
Sticks don't spark.
Every lighter I find I throw in a box and when I get time I modify them into the firestarter from Woodswalker's thread . I have about 10 done so far. Cheap insurance .

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=118377
no but they make fire, if you know how to do it.
I have 150 bic lighters in my stores, but even they wont last forever, once they are used up post SHTF I wont be able to buy any more. then i'm back to steel and flint.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by Zed Hunter » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:22 am

Steel and flint, magnifying glass, all perform better if you have char cloth. Do you know how to make that?

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Re: living without electricity

Post by ZMace » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:30 pm

I carry a bic for brush piles, burn barrels and the wood stove, it stays in my pocket all the time, and I am on my second one since 2012. Assuming 3 years of use (my second one is still practically full) your 150 bics will only last 450 years, so you are right, it is a finite resource. If we haven't figured out how to make a lighter by the year 2450, mankind is probably not around anymore.

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Re: living without electricity

Post by manacheck » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:33 pm

I have some experience with this (thanks to poverty.)

The biggest thing is more the shock of your devices suddenly not being available. Granted, if the situation is local and you can arrange transportation to somewhere with power (like a library, or your place of work) where you can recharge small devices like your phone, at least for emergency purposes (and keep it turned off unless you need it for emergency purposes), but all the same... if you're used to spending most of your day with multiple streams of incoming media, to suddenly have it gone feels apocolyptic lol.

For short term, as in, a day or two, most people would feel less distressed being without clean water than they would being without internet, music, and game access at the touch of a finger.

Also, as long as you have no running water, no electricity doesn't matter quite as much. If your water works and it's freezing temperatures/winter, and your home isn't kept above freezing, if the pipes contain water they can freeze and rupture. If you have a roof over your head and four walls, there's a lot that can be done for warmth even without a fire. Put a tent up in the smallest room in your house. Get a portable Mr Heater buddy if you've got the $89, and some propane. Those are fine to run indoors to heat up a small area. I've had homeless friends who lived in a tent in the winter and that little heater was the best thing they thought they ever purchased.

For me, it was a situation that lasted something like 5 months, during which time I didn't have normal access to heat, water, and power, in a domino effect of not having. Couldn't use the oven, couldn't use the toilet, couldn't use the shower. Couldn't use the heat. Wintertime. Electricity. It didn't start off all those things at once.

I lost heat first. Then water, because no heat; I turned it off and drained the taps to prevent them freezing/bursting. There was no way to safely build a fire inside, unfortunately, so I didn't. No computer access was tough. No music was way harder. Music is a huge morale booster. (One of the best things I've invested a little money into since then that always helps me through times like that, is an AGPtek mp3 player with its 80 hour battery life, chargeable by USB, so worst case scenario, I could use a USB crank/flashlight to re-power it.)

Having not all those things go at once actually was helpful in its own way, since I'd figured out how to bathe, use the bathroom, and various (most somewhat awkward, since I wasn't set up with anything and money was a problem) ways to keep warm, before the power bit.

Getting scared of that stuff happening is the worst part after the panic that your devices aren't gonna work at the moment. Once you look at it as a problem to solve, it's less scary, because you know you can do it. When something scary happens it takes a while to realize it's not a permant thing. Even if "temporary is longer than you think" if you're not freaking out, you can use your head and test to see what works.

FYI: those little mylar emergency blankets? No way do those keep anybody warm. So much freezing cold sweat produced over the one (very, very long) night when I was determined that was going to work. Who knew that fabric that can't breathe creates huge amounts of condensation in the wintertime?! :crazy:

(Also, physically carrying water into a freezing cold home... kind of sucks lol. The right containers make it a lot easier. But it's never really "easy." I appreciate the heck out of my plumbing now.)


This is kind of off topic- I don't know whether anyone's seen the extra features they put on the blu-ray release of Red Dawn, but I found it really interesting the ways the actors talked about how they kept warm in those conditions. Since having gone through conditions where that information is useful, it's always interesting and appreciated when one unexpectedly hears good advice from an unexpected source of first hand knowledge. I'm not likely to trust that things in movies happen the way you see them on screen, but actors from back then talking about using plastic bags keeping frostbite at bay for example, gets my attention. I have plastic bags.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by raptor » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:10 pm

Great post Manacheck. Thank you! It is very informative.

Please tell us more of your experieances.

My experieance without power for a prolonged period due to a hurricane left me with some observations.

The nights in a blacked out city are incredibly dark. I can only liken it to my experience at sea in very overcast night without the bioluminescence. In the ountry the darkness is broken by stars at least on clear nights. In a dark city the buildings obscure the stars. It is simply dark.
It is also very quiet without the HVAC units running outside.

Finally it takes a long time to get used to the fact that no matter how often you hit the light switch, the lights will not illuminate. I instinctively hit the switch almost every day for the duration of the event.

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Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Fri Dec 07, 2018 3:39 am

I don't think many urbanites realise just how dark and how quiet(apart from the screaming) it will be in a power down situation.
I think most people are afraid of the quiet- is that why they make so much noise themselves?? :lol:
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Re: living without electricity

Post by Halfapint » Fri Dec 07, 2018 5:03 am

While nothing like what manacheck talked about. I went without power, running water, toilet, etc for about 5 months. I still had my job so I was able do do all the things I needed there. But I lived in a hammock in a wooded area for the entire time. I had a car so I crept my valuables in there and left my camp just sitting while at work. That was always my biggest stress, was my camp going to be there when I got back.

I had a isobutane pocket rocket stove to heat up water for food but the majority of what I lived off was energy bars bought in bulk. They were some of the cheapest highest calorie density food I could find. Most averaging 500 cal or more and costing a buck or so per bar.

I would take tap water or bottled from work, heat it up on the stove and basically sponge bath myself. Use the left over warm water to drink and then head to bed.

I was very close to a busy road and I always had a a portable battery or two I would keep charged at work. My phone was on so I had internet, phone and texting available. But as manacheck said the biggest moral booster was music. I would listen to music nearly nonstop from the time I left work to falling asleep.

The reason I said a BIC lighter will nearly always work is because that’s what I had. I still have it. I so t use it every day, in fact I use it make 3-4 times a week and this BIC has been with me for going on 10 years. I have a collection of them. Le. Nearly all brown due sentimental value.

Moving forward I never plan to be without the basic nessitoes ever again. All of my planning is to keep power, water and heat on. If I’m without, I failed.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:34 am

I lived for 12 years in a wooden caravan/trailer you'd call it, no power of any kind off grid or on, light was with a couple of storm lanterns, cooking either over a tiny boiling stove-winter, over a camp fire in the summer, drinking and washing was from the small river that ran past the place, toilet was a hole in the ground, I grew all my own veg, foraged for fruit and shot small game with an air rifle.
I loved every minute of it and would do it again in a heartbeat.
how many of the masses could or would live like that? they'd last about a week.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by woodsghost » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:53 am

grumpyviking wrote:
Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:34 am
I lived for 12 years in a wooden caravan/trailer you'd call it, no power of any kind off grid or on, light was with a couple of storm lanterns, cooking either over a tiny boiling stove-winter, over a camp fire in the summer, drinking and washing was from the small river that ran past the place, toilet was a hole in the ground, I grew all my own veg, foraged for fruit and shot small game with an air rifle.
I loved every minute of it and would do it again in a heartbeat.
how many of the masses could or would live like that? they'd last about a week.
This is a good question.

I actually think many could live like this. The question is "how many want to live like this?" The answer: very few.


Something to consider if talking about a post collapse situation: many would die from different diseases. Well, 100% of people die. But many would die prematurely from different diseases. I don't know how you accessed medical facilities or dealt with medical issues at the time. But that, in short, would probably be the real issue for most people.

I think post-collapse the suicide rate would be huge, but once enough people got their heads wrapped around the new situation, I think a lot of people would get along ok, but life would be a constant struggle (12-18 months into some sort of collapse?). This would be the case for both preppers and non-preppers. The reason to be a prepper, IMO, is because you can make the adjustment from pre-collapse to post-collapse more manageable, not because you can avoid it all together.

Just some thoughts.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:41 am

was looking at a news report this morning, millions of O2 mobile customers were off line, they couldnt use anything except the camera on their smartphones, these are the sorts of people who wont cope and will panic and then quickly succumb to whatever will take them out the fastest. the suicide rate amongst the masses will skyrocket. only the ones that can adapt to the new "normal" will survive.
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Re: living without electricity

Post by manacheck » Sat Dec 08, 2018 4:56 pm

grumpyviking: in response to your "I think most people are afraid of the quiet- is that why they make so much noise themselves??" I think there's a lot of truth to that. I was really curious about your method of washing in a stream like that, especially during the winter. I've always had a hard time getting clothes clean by hand when the water is cold. What's your trick?

halfapint: I did that energy bar thing too. It's great for the short term. For long term, the problems that MREs have pop up. I'd be really interested to hear more about the hammock camp you made up, even though it's technically not about electricity and I might be tempting the topic to veer off to that. Yeah, music is life. Survival isn't life. The means is not the ends. (By the way, congrats on defeating that situation. I've stalked many a post of yours over the years as helpful to me!)

woodsghost: "Something to consider if talking about a post collapse situation: many would die from different diseases." I agree. You've got a good, realistic perspective on that. At the risk of potentially going slightly off topic (sorry ^^; ) it's true that many people don't currently have habits established that would keep disease from being a greater problem in any kind of collapse situation. How to wash your hands, if the water pumps aren't on, or water is contaminated, for example. Health is a group effort. Just one person coming in to work gets the whole office sick if things aren't sanitized. Just one person in the grocery store not wearing a cough mask makes for a potential flu outbreak.

But before that, is all the otherwise currently healthy people who rely on medications to keep them alive. Like me, for my dead thyroid. Like those O2 users. Then, there's to consider the many people on mood stabilizing medications. Those medications work, are prescribed for a reason. But a short interruption can have a dramatic result.

Most of us don't have access to more than a short term quantity of their meds. When it's time for me to refill mine, I have three days worth left. That seems like a bad idea, even for just normal potential crises, like from bad weather, interrupting services. But it's not a choice up to us, so it makes me wonder what things related to that CAN be up to us. Not taking medication so a person can have a stockpile isn't the kind of thing I mean, since it defeats the purpose by introducing the problem.

(Well, if the pharmacy's computer system is offline due to electricity down, then it is on topic... :mrgreen: )

raptor: I can't tell you how many of your awesome posts have been of great help to me, personally. Thanks for your encouragement. When I try to share my experience, sometimes it turns into a rambling mess, so I try to avoid talking most of the time, but I'll give it a shot:

I must admit...many of these sorts of experiences I've had, could have been avoided or at least significantly shortened, if I had dealt with them differently from the beginning. Fear, lack of practical knowledge (and just as importantly, experience using it), and hesitation/internal refusals to ask for help- in a lot of these situations, any of those could have taken care of things and got me back to "normal" a lot faster and with significantly less discomfort in many cases. I guess when someone says "living within one's means" it includes what you're willing or able to do for yourself, including what you can do for yourself by way of asking for help from others. (Or not.)

One of the main take-aways I realized was some uncomfortable self-knowledge: When stuff is stressful, I get scared, and when I get scared, I "have" to figure out all the things without help. Like no one else in the world exists except for me, because if I can't fix it, no one can. Apparently. And I can't argue myself out of it with logic even as I know it's happening.

"No, I just have to deal with it; if someone knows I can't, it'll be worse than it is now" is a cognitive issue that I have since noticed other people have in stressful unusual situations, as well. Not just me. Anywhere where someone feels helpless or ignorant, maybe. Fear is powerful and it can't be reasoned with.

I guess that's why the other, bigger, take-away I have from (relatively) short-term life upsets/emergencies I've gone through would be: "you don't know what you ACTUALLY have if you've never used it; you don't know what you actually know if you've never DONE it." The knowledge that fear makes me dig in my heels and be stupid, there's only so much I can do about, except acknowledge it before it takes place... but knowing for sure what's what is something I CAN actually make a difference with anytime, even when things aren't good and "I can't ask for help."

A random example of knowing what you have, I can give right off the top of my head, from during those months in the winter. Knowing what I had wasn't inventory, so much as utility, in this case:

I'd bought a pair of ridiculously thick wool socks. They were too thick to fit inside my normal shoes when I wore them, so I never used them. But I kept them because: "I know wool is warm. Wool is warm even when it's wet! Thick socks are also warm. Therefore, if I keep these socks for emergencies even though I don't use them now, when my feet are exceptionally cold, if I wear them, my feet will be warm."

The logic fail was that I didn't ever test my theory that "the socks" were actually warm. So when I had no heat and I was freezing, the first thing I thought was "I know what people have said. I never tested it myself, but I trust the advice. The advice will be right. Let's put on those thick socks and my feet will be warm so fast." But yeah. No. They were freezing cold. They just could not hold the heat in. Those socks were even worse than thin cotton ones designed for summer use. I still don't even know how it was physically possible for such thick wool socks to be so freezing cold and inept at keeping heat in; it defies all logic. But that's that. I didn't know what I had.

The advice failed me because I didn't test it myself. There were a lot of things like that.

"It's cold inside my home, so that means my refrigerator will work better." Failed.
"If I wear loose clothes in layers, I'll be warmer than wearing something directly against my skin plus layers." Failed.
"Survival blankets will keep me warm. I have one as a backup, so therefore I am coldproof against when it matters! Even if it's zero degrees out." Failed. (facepalm through face)
"This sweater will clearly be warmer than that sweater. So it's useless try the other one if this "good" one turns out not to be warm enough." Failed.
"Cold water cleans as well as warm or hot water, so it's fine if I don't heat it." Failed.
"If I bathe less, I'll be warmer because I have to undress less often. A little dirt will keep me warmer." Failed.
"My cans of soda, seltzer, or beer will be fine even if it's below freezing inside my home and they freeze, because they're in cans." Failed. (By the way, when those explode, they sometimes send sharp bits of can shrapnel across distances lol.)
"This is a good time to get a bunch of stuff done that I didn't have time or concentration for, when things were going well."
"I won't forget that I'm doing (thing I'm doing that can't be forgotten I'm doing, like heating water or burning a candle) and will go back to it before it's a safety hazard; I can just leave it for a moment. My memory is always sharp; cold and stress don't impact that." Failed.
"I should save (x) for when it's really (cold, bad, dark, take your pick) instead of using it now, when it can help."

There were also a lot of things that were helpful to me, that I had at that time (that I haven't had during some other times.)
For instance, I was working full time and had a vehicle. That meant that during a good chunk of the day, I was at work. I often stayed as late at work as I could, which gave an additional bonus of getting more work done, which my employers appreciated, even more because I was happy to be there. There was a laundromat I could use only about 15 minutes away by car, so I didn't have to wash laundry by hand (which isn't fun and uses a lot of water.)

There was a nearby brook with clear, safe drinking water that I could have refilled my water jug using (I didn't; getting my hands splashed with frigid winter brook water, plus the line of people always waiting for it, convinced me quickly that spending the 50 cents a day on a room temperature gallon of water at the grocery store was a better choice.) And I could shop at the grocery store, as it was directly on the way home, so it didn't cost more gas for transportation.

My stovetop was gas-fueled, so even though the lighter was electric, I could light it manually with my own lighter and use it to boil water for sanitation reasons or for cooking rice/food. I had good drains that worked, that I could pour dirty water/fluids down (if liquids were of sufficient quantity and still suffiently warm, they wouldn't stick and freeze on the way down.) I had rooms I could close up in order to keep one smaller area warmer; the area I spent time in. And I had a lot of junk which I repurposed for the sake of keeping me as warm as I could manage.

A lot of the solutions I came up with I wouldn't do again if I had it to do over. Some of them worked well and I would do it the same way (if a better way wasn't obvious by then.)

Sleeping on the couch was warmer than sleeping on the bed. I wore my winter coat to bed, but having the extra side with fabric was a buffer that kept in more warmth.

If things didn't contain water, they didn't freeze. Things that froze, like laundry detergent, didn't thaw usably. I switched to powdered detergent. Once the weather got frigid, I couldn't safely or practically keep canned goods that contained water (if they contained oils instead, or were dehydrated, it was fine. Beans, rice, pasta, were all fine. Frozen soft fruits became like ice cream; frozen hard fruits became inedible.)

I couldn't make microwave dinners. I had to shop smaller amounts more often. I couldn't keep leftovers the way I could when my fridge and freezer were functioning. Washing dishes was more a metter of mess-prevention and scraping things off well. Fresh/food trash was let freeze or dry before going in the garbage bag.

I used a lot more washcloths (and towels) for everything that normally didn't need them. My few plants, including a huge aloe a friend had given me long ago, froze and then died. (If it had been small, maybe I could have brought it to work or gifted it to another friend...)

I had to keep my plastic-held water pretty close to me during the night, since my body was the heatmaker, and it was better if I could drink something in the morning rather than melt ice. Sometimes I would sleep with a bottle or two inside my bedding- made sure they didn't leak first. :crazy: The floor in the kitchen which was laminate, was a death sentence, so I only walked where there was carpet (or where I could put fabric down.)

I got my hands on some cheap foam sheets and plastered/taped/affixed them on all the windows or anywhere there was a draft, so as to keep whatever heat was in, kept in, as much as possible. (Speaking of tape, it doesn't work the same in cold conditions as room temperature conditions. Lots of things are so different when one little environment change happens.)

When I did aerobic style exercise in a small room for a half hour or more, it noticeably increased the temperature. (Maybe not everyone is a radiator like I am, but since I realized that was the effect before things got really cold, I had the motivation to keep it up even when it got real cold and I wanted to hibernate forever. I managed to increase the room temperature by 10 degrees a couple times.)

For hygiene, I had to do bed baths, one segment of body at a time, drying off between segments quickly, so that only small areas of my skin were wet and therefore losing heat from the damp, at a time. That, and so the washcloth wouldn't freeze. To wash hair, I heated water to boiling, then mixed it with the unheated water, to be tolerable (it cooled off real fast even when it started as scalding) and dunked my head in it in a large bowl. Lathered shampoo, rinsed it off using the bowl water. Bed baths need daily cleaning; it's not like showers where you can skip a day. I couldn't use a hair dryer. The tile on the bathroom floor was a heat vampire, so I'd only stand on the rug, and I kept the door closed (as well as all other doors) when I wasn't using it.

My hands were always cold and stiff from cold. I created a muff kind of thing from random fabric/clothes I had around, to bury them in and keep them warmed up in anytime I didn't need to use them for a specific task.
Flashlights (at least the cheap ones) don't work as well when they rely on batteries and it's freezing cold. And as everything was patched up with foam sheets, light even in the morning was indeed low on the totem pole. I don't recall exactly how I dealt with that beyond that I know I had a few decent candlestick holders (the kind you can carry) and I remember having to protect the flames when I would walk from room to room, from the "wind" generated by walking. I also remember that I'd used Shabbot candles I'd had lying around for that, lol. They worked nicely, and no purfume or unpleasant smoke.

I think I used some batery-powered light too. I remember having to warm batteries up by sticking them under my armpit (with an undershirt in the way but still... brr!) before they would work, in some cases. The light would dim as stuff froze back up. I recall that I slept with some things in my pants pockets (like my phone) so that the electronics wouldn't get damaged (though maybe it would have been fine; not sure, but didn't risk it.)


Not having electricity meant a lot of devices I use when things are normal and I have electric, didn't work.

Microwave
Fridge
Freezer
Personal Heater/ AC unit / Electric fans
Desktop computer
Speakers
TV screen / DVD/Blu-ray Player / Satellite/Cable / Xbox/Playstation/Game system (unless you've got a laptop/portable game system that can do it and the battery is functioning and it's during a reasonable operation-temperature period)
Router
Overhead lights / Electric nightlights
Phone charger
Rechargeable battery charger
Any charger
Oven / Electric range
Washer
Dryer
Clothes iron
Dishwasher
Electric Garage Door Opener
Hot water
Running water - any (in many cases)
Shower
Toilet (manual flush will work for most models)
Electric razor / electric toothbrush / hair dryer
Electric alarm clock
Rice cooker / pressure cooker / slow cooker / electric griddle / coffee maker / blender / spice grinder / electric can opener / any cooking or kitchen appliance you plug in
Things were... quiet. (Like raptor said. Different sounds. Hearing more of sounds you don't normally hear and none of the usual white sounds blocking those other things out.) It took a while to get used to and be able to sleep without being tensed up.

And I'm sure I'm missing a few other things.

Of course, those are in a person's home. Outside of the home, loss of electricity- like due to a storm- may impact roads (branches; stoplights), stores (lights, electronic cash registers, credit and debit card readers, refrigeration and freezers in grocery stores), banks/ATMs (lights, withdrawals, manual deposits), gas stations (pumps, lights, registers), internet, gas, and other service providers can also be affected.

In individual cases, sometimes it's easier and less "expensive" to adapt to a situation than to fix it. Like if it "costs" more to admit you don't know how to do something and learn how/pay someone else to do it, than to do without it. But... if I'd had a pet relying on me for their safety at that point... there's no way I would have just tried to manage it myself.

Dunno if this huge long ramble is what you were actually asking for, but you got it. Maybe some part will be useful to someone. Or not. ...I might be better at specific questions than the pandora's box of "tell me more" :lol:
"It is better to light a single candle than to curse the darkness."

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grumpyviking
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Posts: 460
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 5:47 am
Location: rural UK

Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Sun Dec 09, 2018 2:52 am

well the washing I was referring to should have been called bathing I suppose as I was referring to myself! :lol:
as for clothes I used to get some water from the river and heat it over the fire, these days i'd probably put the pan on the log burner to heat up, most clothes arent actually that dirty, they just need rinsing through, its the outer garments that might need a scrub or two, depends what one is doing and how dirty it is.
wring it out as tight as possible and hang to dry, in summer this will normally be outdoors, in the winter indoors on a drying rack, I've just dried some clothes like that the other day, no heating other than the normal heating in the house which in my case is minimal, clothes were dry in 24 hours even jeans!
I think people these days are far too clean, always showering and changing clothes several times a day! wont be like that post SHTF.
Survive, Adapt & Evolve .

grumpyviking
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Posts: 460
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 5:47 am
Location: rural UK

Re: living without electricity

Post by grumpyviking » Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:25 am

I don't believe many people would have the ability, let alone the knowledge, to survive without electricity, especially in Britain, anyone under 40+ who hasn't had any outdoor experience and has lived their entire life with power at the flick of a switch, and we have technology now where you don't even have to do that its all done by voice control, will not in my estimation be able to survive, much less adapt and thrive in the new "normal" once the power goes down.
that's not just lights and heating and cooking, but its mains water, sewage, recharging mobile phones, it means no internet, no deliveries to the stores no refuelling at filling stations, even automatic doors elevators and traffic lights will be inoperative.
Survive, Adapt & Evolve .

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