Medicinal and other useful plants.

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Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Apr 23, 2012 7:50 pm

Medicinal and other useful plants.

This thread is for posting medicinal and other useful properties of plants beyond simply being edible. By medicinal I am not referring to edible even if there are crossovers. Some helpful plants aren’t edible so make certain this distinction is FULLY understood. Claims made within this thread should never be taken in place of proper medical care and are likely not supported by the FDA. Any posted plant should be accompanied with photos and or video plus a description for identification along with a clear statement as to the medicinal or useful properties. A link to document the beneficial claim would also be helpful. Do NOT attempt to use any plant without first doing your own due diligence. ZS is not responsible if you go belly up or get sick or fail to get healthy or if the useful property doesn’t work out. Read this topic at your own risk.
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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Apr 23, 2012 7:50 pm

Jewel weed.

This medicinal plant is a folk remedy for poison ivy, poison oak, bug bites, stings, heat rash, ring worm and many other skin issues. In my AO it has yellow flowers and often grows no higher than 3-feet.

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Jewel weed has green seed pods. When disturbed the pods will explode hence the name touch-me-nots.

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The Jewel weed in my AO has orange, yellow and redish flowers.

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Jewel weed leaves growing in shade. The plant can grow in direct sun but seems to like shady areas. It often grows near water in rich soil.

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Here it is growing in direct sunlight however the patch used to be partially shaded from a tree that is now fallen.

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The plant can be pulled out of the ground intact.

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I use this plant to treat skin irritations like bug bits and poison ivy however for me often the irritant from ivy is mild. I can’t speak of studies or scientific proof but based on actual experience this folk remedy does appear to be of value. I crush the juicy plant in my hands and rub on the irritation. Often the sooner the application the better.

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Actual field use to treat irritation from mosquito bites. It seemed to work.



A few links.

http://customers.hbci.com/~wenonah/hydro/jewelwed.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impatiens" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Jewel weed is listed as a mildly toxic plant so don't consume it.
Last edited by Woods Walker on Mon Sep 17, 2012 8:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Apr 23, 2012 7:50 pm

Sweet fern.

This medicinal plant is used to treat diarrhea, poison ivy, berry preservative, bug repellent and many other uses.I find sweet fern growing in poor rocky soil along roads, trails on the tops of hills but it can be found in a wide range of habitats. Sweet fern seems to prefer direct sunlight. The plant isn’t really a fern however has fern like leaves.

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I use Sweet fern as a natural bug repellent by crushing the leaves and applying about my head, neck and sometimes other areas. I found it effective against gnats and mosquitoes but can’t prove this scientifically.

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Sweet fern grows as a shrub and is often less than 4 feet in height. The crushed leaves have a sweet agreeable smell. I never tried other uses like making tea, treating diarrhea etc etc etc.

Links.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comptonia" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://medicinalherbinfo.org/herbs/SweetFern.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://www.sharonfoc.org/interest/sweetfern.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Last edited by Woods Walker on Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by tookieblueeyes » Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:10 pm

Learning is an ongoing process.

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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by tookieblueeyes » Fri May 04, 2012 10:26 am

Learning is an ongoing process.

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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by tookieblueeyes » Fri May 04, 2012 5:30 pm

Learning is an ongoing process.

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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by TheFishinMagician » Sun Sep 16, 2012 9:05 am

I highly suggest picking up a copy of this book...

Herbal Antibiotics


It contains incredibly useful info on common kitchen herbs that are also powerful natural antibiotics. IMO, everyone needs a copy of this book in their "survival library".
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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by Woods Walker » Sun Sep 16, 2012 11:30 pm

Chaga aka true tinder fungus.

Chaga is one of my favorite medicinal and useful plants/fungus. Chaga is a parasitic fungus that grows on trees by entering a damaged area. Over decades it will eventually kill the host tree. Chaga prefers both White and Yellow birch.

Chaga growing on a Yellow Birch.

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Chaga harvested from a White Birch.

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Chaga can be knocked off using a hatchet or even a stick. The stick method is good for harvesting Chaga higher up.

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Chaga uses.

1. Many people believe that chaga tea is healthy. Here are a few links on how to make it.

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http://mushroom-collecting.com/mushroomchaga.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://www.keystoneherbs.com/how-to-use" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

2. Chaga incense. The smoke from a smoldering chunk of chaga is said to clear the mind and repel mosquitoes. Is this true? Not sure but I do like the way it smells.

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3. Chaga used in Firecraft. This is my biggest use for the fungus. Chaga will catch a slight spark from carbon steel and flint/quartz/chert, hotter spark from a fire steel, concentrated sunlight and even a fire piston. It will also work as a coal extender to hold a coal or transport a fire.

This chaga was sliced off and hit with a firesteel.

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Chaga used in Flint and Steel or in my case quartz and carbon steel file or striker.

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For flint and steel I prefer to turn lower firecraft grade chaga into dust. Spongy chaga will catch a spark easier than the woodier growth

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Chaga is very useful and I encourage people to experiment with it. But never consume anything unless 100% certain of the ID. By consumption making tea and breathing in smoke (from the incense) counts.
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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by Slugg » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:14 pm

Has anyone every looked into Ackee for diabetics in a PAW? It runs in my family, so I'm always worried I'd acquire it after insulin is no longer able to be obtained for whatever reason. I have heard Ackee is banned from imortation into the U.S in raw form due to it dropping blood glucose levels to the point of death if not controlled. That may be the best option for someone with diabetes in a PAW to use as an insulin substitute. Please note that this is not to be tested and is probably very very dangerous and more likely to kill you before you figure out it's properties.
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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by azrael99 » Thu Mar 13, 2014 12:40 am

birch bark can be used as a light painkiller and a good source of vitamin C, that actually what Jacques Cartier and his crew were given by the native when arrived in Canada while suffering of scurvy .

Garlic is a strong immune system booster.
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Re: Medicinal and other useful plants.

Post by ineffableone » Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:22 am

Mullein

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Has one of the most important uses. It's leaves make great TP. Velvety soft, large, and strong. I am not kidding about velvety either, the leaves feel very similar to velvet due to soft hairs on the leaves, there are some reports of people getting a fiberglass like irritation from these hairs but I have never experienced this. But it is worth noting that some have. I would expect this might be due to the leaves used being old so the hairs more brittle and falling out maybe?

Dried stalks can be used for friction fire, the pith can be used as a char material.

Smoking dried mullein leaves is an expectorant, it makes you cough and bring up matter in your lungs.

Mullein tea is good treating respiratory and other types of conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and allergies. It is also effective in treating sore throats and coughs.

A mullein poultice soothes skin irritations, such as rashes, boils, and even chilblains. A poultice can also be used for bruises and to relieve arthritic and rheumatic conditions. The herb's anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties make mullein compresses an ideal treatment for hemorrhoids and cold sores.

And there is a lot more uses for mullein.
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Purslane

Post by Murphman » Thu Mar 13, 2014 10:14 am

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purslane contains more omega 3 fatty acids than any other plant source in the solar system, and an extraordinary amount for a plant, some 8.5 mg for every gram of weight. It has vitamin A, B, C and E — six times more E than spinach — beta carotene — seven times more of that than carrots — magnesium, calcium, potassium, folate, lithium — keep you sane — iron and is 2.5% protein. Two pigments, one in the leaves and one in the yellow blossoms, have been proven anti-mutagenic in lab studies, meaning they help keep human cells from mutating, which is how cancer gets started. And you get all that for about 15 calories per 100 gram (three ounce) serving.
IDENTIFICATION: Smooth, reddish, mostly low-growing stems, alternate spatula leaves clustered at stem joints and ends, yellow flowers, capsule seed pods. Very fleshy. NOT HAIRY. CLEAR SAP. Those are important, not hairy, and clear sap.

TIME OF YEAR: Any time in season, spring and summer in northern climes, year round in warmer areas.

ENVIRONMENT: Nearly any disturbed grass, likes full sun, often grows two crops in Florida, spring and fall, tolerates the summer heat.

METHOD OF PREPARATION: Leaves and stems raw in salads, cooked in soups, thick stems pickled. Wild version invariably tasted better than cultivated versions. Has a slightly sour/salty taste.
http://www.eattheweeds.com/purslane-omega-3-fatty-weed/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

It has self-seeded itself in my raised beds in Florida, and I used to throw it away in droves in my large garden in Pa before I knew it was edible. I love the taste, but not as the main green in a salad. Not a fan of it cooked.

Find a local mentor, and learn from them, as many plants have a limited range. Make sure to identify in all 4 seasons, and never, never, never ingest a plant that you are not 100% sure you have identified correctly, and even then, start with a very, very small portion.

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