Wild Edibles Identification Guide

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Woods Walker
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide

Post by Woods Walker » Wed May 13, 2015 10:01 pm

Violets: A wild edible.

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Just a short video on a wild edible, violets on the trail. Remember don't eat any wild edible unless 100% certain of the ID. Don't eat anything because solely based on a Youtube video from me or anyone else. Also don't eat the roots, only the leaves and flowers once you're sure of the ID.

E
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide

Post by Woods Walker » Tue Jun 30, 2015 7:43 pm

Raspberry smack down. Black vs. Red. After all we need another (vs) thread online.

I found these two types of raspberries during the same hike.

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These two raspberry species ripen around the same time and occupy the same niche within my woods so a show down was inevitable and on going. Both seem to be on the decline in my area. Maybe due to competition with invasive raspberry species. Leaves of three.

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Black Cap Raspberries:

1. Similarities.

They have leaves of three, like the margins of fields or other open areas. They have thorns and all the same bramble characteristics. In the same family near as I can tell etc etc.

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2. Differences.

They turn black or very dark purple when ripe and seem to tolerate shade better though that's an observation not based on researched fact. Heck I did ZERO Google research before typing this. Oh well.

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I believe they taste better and seem more common in my area than the reds but less so than Wine berries.

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Red Raspberries:

1. Similarities. See above within the descripton of Black Caps.

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2. Differences.

Unlike Black Caps they're ripe when red. Often the berries are bigger. They might have larger thorns but it's kinda hard to tell. They're really being pushed out by the invasive Wine berries in my area IMHO.

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Conclusion:

They're both great but (vs) threads garner more attention online so did what needed to be done.

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Yup, I even made a raspberry video. Someone has too much time on their hands. Thanks for looking and remember don't eat any wild edible you're not 100% certain of.

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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide

Post by Woods Walker » Sun Oct 11, 2015 9:58 am

Seagrapes.

Here is a link to the all knowing Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccoloba_uvifera

Some personal observations. Unlike grapes they don't seem to ripen in an entire cluster rather singularly so despite having a big green cluster there might only be a few ready to eat. Other times there could be more ripe than green but it seems almost random. I believe these are fruit not berries. They have an annoying tendency to drop off when attempting to be picked. Also wasps like the nest on the underside of the wide leaves presumably using them as an umbrella for the nest. Take a second to took for them before diving in.

They can grow as shrubs or trees and don't appear to have too many problems with poor sandy soil or salt. Seagrape bark.

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Clusters of fruit.

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Sometimes the ripe ones fall off making the cluster less evidence so don't be tricked.

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The fruit is mostly pit.

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Despite being mostly pit the outer layer is worth the effort IMHO. Sometimes when jogging in the Florida 92 degree sun with 92 percent humidity I stopped to pick a few. They are really sweet and the fluid was a nice pick me up. As always don't eat anything unless you're 100% certain of the ID.

Here is a short video.



Thanks for looking.
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Aug 01, 2016 8:35 am

Appalachian trail Staghorn Sumac tea.

1. Stop along the trail. Find Staghorn Sumac. This time of the year before the heavy Autumn rains wash away the goodness is best IMHO. Use the red Staghorn Sumac berry clusters not other types aka poison sumac.

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2. Get to camp are remove the red berry clusters from bag.

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3. Soak in cool water as setting up camp. Do not use hot water.

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4. Pour into another container using bandanna for filter out floaters.

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5. Drink up. It was good!

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A video of the process on the AT.



Thanks for watching.
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide

Post by bacpacjac » Wed Aug 03, 2016 7:30 am

I'm loving this thread. The bacpackiddos and I are on a quest this summer to identify the wild edibles in our area. Thanks for all the helpful info gang!! Much appreciated!
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide

Post by Vallyn » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:53 am

Great thread! Not a lot that I can contribute, but this year I learned that the yellow flowers of dandelions are delicious. I rinsed mine, dredged them in flour, and fried them. Flavor is reminiscent of button mushrooms.

Hoping to get my hands on some pawpaws. I found a bunch of trees a few weeks back, but the fruits didn't seem ripe yet. If I can, the seeds are going in my backyard.

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