Mora Firecraft. Charred materials.

Devoted to survival skills in the wilderness

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

Post Reply
User avatar
Woods Walker
ZS Global Moderator
ZS Global Moderator
Posts: 9404
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2006 5:15 pm
Location: CT

Mora Firecraft. Charred materials.

Post by Woods Walker » Wed Mar 28, 2018 1:44 pm

For this episode of Mora Firecraft I will be employing flint and steel methodologies.The premise will be using one piece of charred cloth and a tin to start multiple fires. I will use nothing beyond a Mora #2, tin and single piece of charred cloth. Everything else must be foraged in the woods. Lets GO!!!

Cedar bark.....

Image

Tulip Poplar bark.

Image

Image

Often areas of drainage and moving water are best to find rocks for flint and steel.

Image

This quartz looks ok.

Image

I ran into this just sitting on the ground. No obvious erosion so I guess that theory is shot. Not really as stuff just happens. I take multiple rocks as it's not consistent in terms of effectiveness.

Image

Yellow Birch bark.

Image

Punk wood.

Image

Processing the rocks.

Image

Here is all the stuff I found then processed. For those not familiar with natural char I brought some examples however will only use the tin on the right with the single piece of char cloth to start the initial fire. The tinder, hydrocarbon accelerate and rocks were all foraged that day as show above and in the video. From left to right. Charred cattail which can be finicky (pun intended). Charred punk wood which tends to be a winner. Charred Tulip Poplar bark which is good. I think cedar bark is overall better at just about everything but can find more Tulip Poplar. Lastly the charred cloth.

Image

I picked the Altoids container as that's often used for a small PSK and there isn't much firecraft stuff inside many of them. Char cloth is thin and flat so I think it's a good addition. Time to get the fire going. I am holding the knife in one hand that the rock with charcoth on top in the other.

Image

You can see sparks flying which ignited the charcloth.

Image

Fire. I will go into the tinder bundle later.

Image

This method is dangerous IMHO. I tend to keep my knives sharp. If forced to employ this method a nasty cut hand might complicate things. Just something to keep in mind.

Image

Image

Time to char the natural material for the secondary fire. That is the intent. Get the intial fire then char materials for additional fires.

Cedar bark.

Image

Punk wood.

Image

Cooking on the twig stove till they both try stop smoking. The bark was done first so that was removed. I charred a total of 3 tins worth of material. I would do the same over kill if employing this method out of need. The work is already done so why not.

Image

With the charring done it was time for some bacon. OMG! My bacon is on fire!!!!!

Image

Next I used the twig fire methodology for the second fire. I used the charred cedar bark and punk wood as was out of charcloth. Had plenty of rocks left over. My tinder bundle material was getting low so mixed the cedar and tulip poplar bark.

Image

The tinder bundle was a mixture of everything. I wanedt a BIG target and have plenty of char.

Image

This time I used a safer method. Striking down.

Image

The actual small spark which was caught by charred punk wood.

Image

Ignited charred materials get very hot when air is blown on them. As there was a large amount and given the winds the tinder bundle almost instantly self ignited.

Image

Fire!!

Image

There is a nearly endless supply of materials to keep the method going in the field.

Image

Here is a video. Thanks for looking at the second episode of Mora Firecraft.

Image

"There's no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"
"Do not mess with the forces of Nature, for thou art small and biodegradable!"

Best of Woods Walker's posts.

Post Reply

Return to “Bushcraft”