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PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:58 am 
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About a week ago I was in these woods doing some muti fuel stove tests during rainy weather and noticed this can. Normally I would have picked it up but decided to leave it for something special. When I went back out some days later the can was still there. One pro to trash is often it doesn't go anyplace. That's also it's primary con. The can was probably washed down stream when some unfortunate person found it impossibly heavy once empty. It wasn't too heavy full but they seem to get heavier the less beverage remaining forcing people to drop them.

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Water was still moving but down from the flood levels.

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For this skills practice I will ignite a Core 4 Ti stove using a sock and the pitted beaten to heck can.

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But first we are going to need some stuff beyond what we already got. Very often my pyro shopping list is the same.

Cedar bark.

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Tulip Poplar bark.

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Yellow birch bark. I like to get a hydrocarbon component to any fire as they burn so well.

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We might need this flat piece as well but really want the fluffier bark.

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So lets go! First we crush the can to a hockey puck.

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But there is a danger in this. Aluminum will develop sharp edges easily if torn or bent. I like to tap the sides on a rock to flatten them out.

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How do I know it can bite you? Found out the hard way some time ago.

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That cut on my finger was deeper than it looks. That nasty can did it just as easily as any knife.

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By now many have probably worked out I have no intentions of starting a fire using a can and chocolate bar. Aw heck if in a bad way I would probably have eaten the chocolate within the first 5 minutes. No. We won't be doing that plus this is one ratty can. In fact lots of wild cans are. They go feral in the woods like pigs. Now for the sock. The can is going to get hot so will use the sock to both insulate and protect my hand from any missed sharp edges

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The rest of the goodies.

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The knife we will be using to both work the set and cut the sacred bacon is a Wolf Creek Forge blank. Micarda is tougher than I thought but it came out ok.

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CMP3V holds a nice edge and is more rust resistant than 1095, O1 etc etc etc.

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Time to GO! These photos were pulled from the video. One of the downsides to doing a video is certain times yea can't take photos. I needed my toes to monkey hold the chaga in place as the spindle spun against the bottom of the can drilling into the fungus. You want less friction at the bearing block and more at the fire board. Aluminum is fairly low friction compared to other things in the woods. Some pithy spindles like mullein can really spin good against a can as the point flattens out which is more problematic against wood IMO.

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Smoke rising from inside the drilled hole shows the coal. Once chaga takes a coal it's very difficult to extinguish. I was unable to do so by cutting the coal out then dumping the smoldering fungus into the tinder bundle. Even invisible micro sparks will reignite the material.

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So the rule about taking the tinder bundle to the coal doesn't apply here. Also the coal is pervasive and easily expanded as chaga is one of the best coal extenders in the woods. It's a two for one deal. The tinder bundle of fluffed bark easily ignited with little concern.

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The birch bark took care of the rest.

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In the end I had to snuff the chaga out with dirt and even then could not totally trust it was out.

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That's it.

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Here is a video for those who like that format. Thanks for looking.


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"There's no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"
"Do not mess with the forces of Nature, for thou art small and biodegradable!"

Best of Woods Walker's posts.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2017 10:56 pm 
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Decided to mess around more with the old can which was rescued this time from the recycle bin. After this I am going to duct tape the sides and add it to my firecraft stuff. Wonder how long it will last?

Mullein on mullein using a can and sock.

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Original BHK Tiger knapp in O1.

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I have decided to shave my legs for the prom. Going to totally do it using only Bushcraft knives.

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Ready....

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And I failed twice.

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That's ok because I got some sycamore.

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About 7 seconds later.

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A blunt bearing block end of the spindle is normally a death notice for failure but not in the case of an aluminum can bearing block though I do have ways to work it out with a wooden block. Still often this is bad news.

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Not finished yet but using a new spindle as done playing with the mullein. Here is something to consider. I believe the inclination to make a set during each outing is a product of the modern bushcraft culture. I think back in the day a proven set was used up then replaced near the end of it's life. Those who did it got plenty of practice as it was done every day. They didn't need to create a new set each time. This way fire was more assured. Also you don't need to mate a spindle to the fireboard each and every time IMHO. Like the last coal I am just going to use a previous burn from a different spindle which was larger in diameter.

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I will adjust the V-cut and rough up the spindle then sharpen the bearing block end. All of which will take maybe 15 seconds. No burn in etc etc etc etc etc. Though anything can and sometimes does happen also I am no expert but it's been my observation ignition doesn't often happen on the sides rather at some point along the V cut and bottom of the spindle. The sides IMHO are really just more friction sucking energy away from the pinpoint of ignition though the entire mass around that point needs to be warm or the energy will also get sucked away. In any case it won't matter if the spindle isn't mated to the hole IMHO.

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Go! Notice the black overlap as the hole is larger than the spindle. It won't matter.

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Way less than 10 seconds but didn't time it. Ignited so fast and spun like it was on a drill press.

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Done.

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Now I am not saying don't make a set each time. Just saying what I do.

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"There's no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"
"Do not mess with the forces of Nature, for thou art small and biodegradable!"

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2017 11:33 pm 
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Not done yet. A big crazy thick 1095 striker knife from Wolf Creek Forge, flint, chaga and the can!

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The mass of the knife means it doesn't move much when stuck and hits hard as it strikes.

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Differential heat treatment with a hard spine and tempered blade. It's the best of both worlds though this one is specially made to be a fine striker. Still the blade is no joke and holds a nice edge without chipping because it's not dead hard like the spine.

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See. I was serious about shaving my legs using only bushcraft knives. :lol:

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Using the rock as a scrapper. The can is just about perfect to catch the dust. During the heat of the day odds are it would help dry out damp chaga really fast in the sun. Going to test that theory out but it's knida obvious.

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Go! Methodology is rock hitting the spine of the knife.

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I can just dump the coal into a pile. I don't need to wait till it solidifies the way yea want a normal friction fire coal to.

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But it's still dust so wind is a risk.

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I am going to head out soon to find some wet and wild chage to see how fast the can bottom could dry the dust in the sun.

Bonus.

I have a knife so gotta cut into something.

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Go! The methodology is spine of knife hitting rock.

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Thanks for looking.

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"There's no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"
"Do not mess with the forces of Nature, for thou art small and biodegradable!"

Best of Woods Walker's posts.


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