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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:39 pm 
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Mikeyboy wrote:
And if there is never a worldwide pandemic, but some other SHTF event that involves rain....you have a rain suit.



That is an excellent point I forgot to make.

I have said this many times but I will say it again.
With a little fore thought many preps are quite capable of multi-tasking for wide variety of situations.
You just have to think outside the box and sometimes you may have to jury rig them to fill the task but in most instances you can make them serviceable.

This is exactly the case here.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 2:01 pm 
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raptor wrote:
Mikeyboy wrote:
And if there is never a worldwide pandemic, but some other SHTF event that involves rain....you have a rain suit.

That is an excellent point I forgot to make.

I have said this many times but I will say it again.
With a little fore thought many preps are quite capable of multi-tasking for wide variety of situations.
You just have to think outside the box and sometimes you may have to jury rig them to fill the task but in most instances you can make them serviceable.

This is exactly the case here.


Hence why I wanted suggestions apart from tyvex and nbc gear.

Thanks guys.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 2:59 pm 
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A good article on what suiting up for direct patient care looks like. Note this is not what they wear all the time but rather what patient care workers wear in a contaminated ward.

Note the apron. It is an item that appears to be very useful and actually limits exposure to the underlying protective suit. A towel tied to the waist (not thrown over the shoulder or around the neck) may be a good substitute for an apron.

http://apps.washingtonpost.com/g/page/n ... 2/?hpid=z4

Quote:
• Each worker is accompanied by a partner, who spot-checks for exposed skin or tears in the equipment.
• Before entering treatment centers, workers wash with a water solution of 0.5 percent chlorine or soap and water.
• Once in the treatment center, workers should not touch their face. They should limit the number of surfaces they touch and must wash their gloved hands frequently.
• Workers should change gloves if they become heavily contaminated. If supply allows, gloves must be changed when moving from patient to patient. When leaving the treatment center, workers are sprayed with a chlorine solution and step through a chlorine basin in a decontamination zone.
• In the decontamination area, workers first remove outer gloves and place them in a biohazard container.
• Workers wash their hands in a chlorine solution or soap and water after removing each item of protective clothing.
• As they leave the containment area, their feet are sprayed with a chlorine solution.
• Coveralls, goggles, boots and aprons can be reused after disinfection. Gloves, facemasks, respirators and surgical caps are incinerated.



Another article on the transmission of ebola.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-y ... ingtonpost


Article discussing removal of PPE:
http://www.cdc.gov/hicpac/2007IP/2007ip_fig.html

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Last edited by raptor on Thu Oct 02, 2014 1:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 3:27 pm 
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raptor wrote:
I am giving this thread a bump not just because of the Ebola news but also because flu season is right around the corner.

My company is giving us flu shots next week. Have you guys had yours yet?

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 1:27 pm 
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raptor wrote:
That is a good question. I will tell you what I have and suggest. I am sure others can chime in here.

My supplies are simple rain suits. They come in wide variety of colors. I have light blue ones for exactly the reason you mentioned. To be somewhat discrete.



Thanks for the info Raptor. I just ordered a few "upgrades" for my supplies. I didn't want to link your entire post, so I cut it off. Let them go look for it on page 3 :)

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 1:43 pm 
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If you like anecdotal evidence and have doubts about improvised PPE (in this case, trashbags, a rain coat, and wellingtons), try reading this: http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/25/health/ebola-fatu-family/.

Can't remember whether I first heard about this on ZS or not but it is more than worth reposting.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2014 11:10 am 
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A shameless and blatant rip off from another thread which has excellent links to disinfectants.

http://www.bccdc.ca/NR/rdonlyres/EAA94A ... ov0503.pdf

http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ ... rfaces.pdf

duodecima wrote:
raptor wrote:
Do you have any data/info on what basic process may be required to render the contaminated materials/surfaces reasonable safe? Not sterile but reasonable safe.

Of course autoclaves(see note at bottom!) and incineration will work nicely but I am thinking about household cleaners like a bleach solution or hot water and detergent in a washing machine.

Raptor, best source I have for this is the CDC recommendations for hospital environmental control (which is what the janitors get called in a hospital.) They have, btw, been massively clear that they are making these recommendations for hospital patients and they don't automatically apply to non-hospital patients. So I'd figure if you cleaned something to the CDC's hospital standards, you'd be pretty good from a "reasonable action to mitigate risk" standpoint.

AND you'd do it without introducing the possibly novel problem of what happens if Ebola meets a pressure washer :oh: , since that literally may not have happened before, pressure washers likely not being real common in Monrovia and other parts West Africa. (Y'all with West Africa time let me know if I'm wrong about that.) Because we need NEW problems with Ebola. This was kinda thing that hadn't even crossed my mind when I said bad data could kill and optics and paranoia could really make things a lot worse. (Mind you, I'm not overly concerned that there was Ebola on that sidewalk to meet the pressure washer. But I'm just waiting for some eejit to decide that's a good idea... :evil: ) Keep in mind, more is not always more.

Excerpts from the hospital cleaning recommendations, most of the good stuff is down in the FAQ :
Quote:
How should spills of blood or other body substances be managed?

The basic principles for blood or body substance spill management are outlined in the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogen Standards (29 CFR 1910.1030).4 CDC guidelines recommend removal of bulk spill matter, cleaning the site, and then disinfecting the site.3 For large spills, a chemical disinfectant with sufficient potency is needed to overcome the tendency of proteins in blood and other body substances to neutralize the disinfectant's active ingredient. An EPA-registered hospital disinfectant with label claims for non-enveloped viruses (e.g., norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus) and instructions for cleaning and decontaminating surfaces or objects soiled with blood or body fluids should be used according to those instructions.

I'm betting Raptor or his contractors already have the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen thing covered, since my daughter's school has a well-labelled cleanup kit for it. So, which disinfectant was that again?
Quote:
How can I determine whether a particular EPA-registered hospital disinfectant is appropriate for use in the room of a patient with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus infection?

Begin by looking at the product label or product insert or, if these are not available, search the EPA search engine for this information. Users should be aware that an 'enveloped' or 'non-enveloped virus' designation may not be included on the container label. Instead check the disinfectant's label for at least one of the common non-enveloped viruses (e.g., norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus).


So THIS CHART of hospital grade disinfectants and what it kills/doesn't is CHOCK FULL(No really I'm going to print it out and laminate it) of good general info about what kills what. (On SURFACES. This means like floors, walls,counters, plastic things. This does NOT include skin, food, medicines, or linens/carpets, just in case that needs to be said. Given somebody decided to pressure wash that sidewalk, I'm thinking it needs to be said. :vmad: ) Ebola, btw, is an enveloped virus. Those are generally killed by lots of things. Since it acts a little tougher than average, they're recommending to treat it as an unenveloped virus, which seems like an appropriate abundance of caution to me.

This"Guide to Selection and Use of Disinfectants" from the British Columbia CDC is also a really excellent resource, not overly technical (to my eye?) and table 6.3 tells you what strengths of bleach for surfaces, which agrees with the WHO recommendations Shrap posted earlier. (Also, since tonite I feel these things need to be said - "Food Surfaces" means bleach concentrations for surfaces you prepare/eat food on, NOT putting bleach on the surface of food!)

In re: autoclaves - we realize everybody with a pressure canner to 15 psi has a really basic autoclave, right? Granted there's a lot of stuff we shouldn't put thru a pressure canner and it's certainly not EPA or OSHA approved, but in case of zombies, there's some stuff I certainly would...


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 12:40 am 
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So here's another good general pathogen info resource I came across : the Public Health Agency of Canada has "Pathogen Safety Data Sheets and Risk Assessment" for a whole library of pathogens. Including Ebola. It's a bit like a Materials Safety Data Sheet for various germs. Technical stuff. But succinctly technical, if you're looking for info. (With footnotes! :D )

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/index-eng.php#e

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 2:40 am 
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 10:07 pm 
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Another reposted item with a good article on how one town deal with the ebola outbreak in Liberia.

KGBrick wrote:
A Firestone company town of 80,000 people in Liberia has had enormous success in dealing with the Ebola outbreak. They set up their own Ebola ward, used their closed schools as voluntary isolation units, and used the teachers to educate locals. The Ebola ward was nearly full in the middle of September but they now they are down to three patients. The survival rate hasn't been spectacular but it seems that with moderate resources and adequate education and precautions they've contained the local outbreak.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2014/10/06/354054915/firestone-did-what-governments-have-not-stopped-ebola-in-its-tracks

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2014 11:07 pm 
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Cross posting for relevance : WHO infection control procedures for hemmhoragic fevers (focus on Ebola but applicable to others)
http://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/ebola/filovirus_infection_control/en/
Includes things like specifically how much bleach to soak your non-disposable gear in overnight, and specific instructions with pics about how to take gear on and off, and how to clean the room after.

Also - not sure this is quite the spot for it but I don't know where else is :
WHO guidelines on building hospitals/isolation rooms with natural ventilation that meets certain air exchange targets. Fairly technical overall, but the second section at the end has diagrams of different models. God forbid I'm ever in charge of building a hospital, it'll probably be the ZPAW and natural ventilation will be the only option...
http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2009/9789241547857_eng.pdf

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2014 12:34 pm 
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This is a link to an interesting first hand experience from an ebola survivor.

http://www.vox.com/2014/8/12/5992083/th ... k-survivor

Quote:
Gloria Tumwijuke can't forget the patient who gave her Ebola: she was a young mother, five months pregnant with another child. She arrived at the hospital on a blood-drenched mattress, blood rushing out of her eyes, nose, and ears. Gloria, a midwife, didn't suspect Ebola. She tried to save her patient and instead contracted one of the world's deadliest viruses.

Gloria is among a handful of survivors of a 2012 Ebola outbreak in the Kibaale district of western Uganda. The disease struck 11 people; four died. (Read: 17 things you need to know about the Ebola virus.)

From her home in Kibaale, she told me about what Ebola did to her body, how she beat it, and what it was like return to a community where everyone was afraid of her. Here's a transcript of our conversation, edited for clarity.

Julia Belluz: How did you come into contact with the Ebola virus?

"THE MOTHER WAS BLEEDING IN THE MOUTH, NOSE, AND EARS. THEY CARRIED HER INTO THE HOSPITAL ON A MATTRESS COVERED WITH BLOOD."

Gloria Tumwijuke: I was seeing a mother who had had a pregnancy for five months, and she came into the hospital bleeding. The mother was bleeding in the mouth, nose, and ears. They carried her into the hospital on a mattress, and the mattress was covered with blood. She couldn't talk. I was getting her history and found out her relatives had passed away, her husband died. All of her children died.

I started cleaning her, putting all the fluids in her, giving her antibiotics. After removing the fetus, she kept severely bleeding. The baby was already dead. I cared for her for six hours but eventually she died. She had Ebola. I ended up getting Ebola.

JB: Were you wearing protective gear — gloves, a gown, a mask — when you cared for this patient?

GT: When she came in, I was putting on gloves. I didn't put on boots. I didn't have a gown. I was trying to remove the placenta from her, and blood gushed on me, on my arms and body. I cleaned myself quickly because I was worried. Then I continued to help her.

I realized I didn't protect myself very well. But the mother entered into the hospital very quickly, and I had to rush quickly to help her. She was going to fall off the bed, and I was trying to support her. I didn't have time to put on my gown. This taught me to protect myself before I do any procedure.

156442393 Ugandan health officials prepare an isolation center at Nyimbwa Health Center in Uganda on November 15, 2012. Photo courtesy of AFP/Getty Images.

JB: At that time, did you suspect this woman might have Ebola?

GT: I didn't even know Ebola was in Uganda. At that time, Ebola had not yet been known in my region.

JB: When did you realize you had the virus?

GT: A week after my patient died, I started vomiting. I started having diarrhea and sweating. I started hearing people talk about the virus in the same hospital in which I was working. I read in the newspapers that they were talking about suspecting the virus was here. But after I saw I had all the signs and symptoms of Ebola, I remembered the pregnant lady, and she had all the signs. That's when I suspected I had the virus.

JB: What happened next?

GT: I was taken to the hospital by ambulance. They took a sample of my blood, and told me I had Ebola. They transferred me to an isolation room, and started to care for me. They put fluids in me through an IV, and gave me antibiotics. They were monitoring me frequently. I couldn't move from the bed. I couldn't talk. I couldn't do anything. I lost 25 pounds. I was in the hospital for one month when they discharged me.

"IN MY HEAD I WAS LIKE, 'I'M GOING TO DIE.' I JUST THOUGHT I WOULD DIE."

JB: What were you thinking when you got the Ebola diagnosis?

GT: In my head I was like, 'I'm going to die.' I just thought I would die. My sister said, "You're not going to die." I couldn't talk. I was worried about the people who touched me before they knew I had the virus. When they told me they were going to keep on treating me, I was worried about my friends dying. I can't believe I am alive.

JB: Did you give anyone the virus?

GT: No, no one I know got the virus. The laborers who were caring for (the pregnant woman), all of them died.

JB: When did your condition start to improve?

GT: I was discharged from the hospital after one month. After two months, I started to improve. But I still had problems. I was forgetting a lot. My hair was falling out. The hair from my head was all over. My skin was peeling off. I weighed 25 pounds less. I had heart palpitations. The hair took months to grow back. My memory was bad for one year.

"PEOPLE WOULD RUN AWAY FROM ME. THEY WERE NOT WILLING TO BE NEAR ME."

JB: How did people receive you when you returned to your community?

GT: They ignored me, thinking I still had a sickness because they think Ebola can't (be survived). They hide from me. People would run away from me. They were not willing to be near me. But the hospital discharged me because they were sure I was free from Ebola. I showed people (my discharge) certificate. They started to believe I was okay. When I showed them the certificate, they started to welcome me.

JB: When your friends were avoiding you, how did you feel?

GT: I didn't feel bad because it is their right: Ebola spreads when you contact other people who have the virus. But I could feel some stigma when they ran away from me.

JB: This virus can kill up to 90 percent of those who get it. Why do you think you survived when so many others die?

GT: I had my sister who is a medical person. She could go and buy all the drugs, fluids, and antibiotics for me. She was by my side. She changed my dirty sheets. She knew how to prevent herself from getting Ebola by using protection. My husband is a nurse. He was also helping my sister to treat me and be careful. He could pray for me. When I survived he was so happy.

JB: Did you ever feel any guilt being one who lived while so many others don't?

GT: When I hear other people die, in my heart I feel like god really loves me. Because many people died and he left me in the hospital. When I'm hearing of other people dying, I feel bad. I feel like maybe I lived because I had a lot of help. I had IV fluids. My heart tells me maybe if those people could have good nurses who can offer their services, maybe those people really can survive.

JB: Have you experienced any long term side-effects from the virus?

GT: Actually I'm good. I don't have any problems. After four months I was back to normal. The thing that persisted for the whole year, it was forgetting. My memory was bad. Also I couldn't resume my period for five months.

JB: In this current outbreak, a lot of health-care workers have died from Ebola, and now there's fear and people are walking off the job. What advice would you give to other health workers in an outbreak?

GT: When you put on protective gear and you're not in direct contact with the person's (bodily fluids) you can treat them and they get better. People need to understand that because, if we didn't have health-care workers who help us, who didn't run away, what would we do?

JB: How are you feeling when you read the news about this outbreak in West Africa?

GT: I'm praying for those people who are very sick. I'm praying for the health workers too. I am just praying so they can also survive like me. I'm just imagining they should get enough care, which I needed. Enough care, enough treatment so they can also come up and be a survivor like me.

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 Post subject: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 6:41 pm 
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what would be some quick items to have on hand if you suddenly were afraid to go to the grocery store,also what would be a good user friendly water purifier to have on hand just in case. Basically preparing for the worst and hoping for the best. Would appreciate any recommendations or advice. :?:


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 Post subject: Re: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 7:53 pm 
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If things get that bad that you are justifiably afraid of going shopping, there might not be any shops left open anyway. However...

Given that ebola is a biohazard Lv4 virus, and that healthcare workers in Lv2 PPE are getting it, I think we have to forget simple paper masks. They simply don't seal well enough to start with. Better than absolutely nothing, but if you think you are at risk it's just not enough.

IF ebola was actually spreading to that degree, the minimum kit I would be going out in would be a full face respirator like a 3M 6000 series or similar, with P100 filters. That's not all that expensive, but it is bulky so might not be what you had in mind as 'quick items to have on hand'.

You'll also need head-to-toe coverage from something like a tychem coverall, or a well-sealed plastic raincoat and pants. Plus gloves, preferably a few layers.

The biggest problem you'll face is decontamination before taking all that kit off. Why decontaminate? Well, if ebola is enough of a concern that you're wearing the kit, then you don't know if the guy coughing behind you in the checkout line has flu or ebola. If it's ebola, you might now be covered with specks of aerosolised virus. You just don't know, so you have to assume the worst, every time you get near people.

Decontamination generally means spraying/brushing very thoroughly with dilute bleach. Really, it needs a helper to do effectively (who also has to be wearing PPE of course). Then you can take the kit off. If you are decontaminating yourself it's more complicated.

So... no easy answer unfortunately. Let's just hope things don't go that far. My plan is just to stay indoors if it does.


The water filter is easier. If you want something that will remove virii, then I would recommend the lifesaver bottle. It's about as easy to use as it gets, and does remove virii which most filter don't. It doesn't add any nasty chemicals either, which iodine-based filters can.

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 Post subject: Re: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 7:56 pm 
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Why the water purifier? It seems extremely unlikely a municipal water supply, or even a home well, would get contaminated due to an Ebola outbreak.

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 Post subject: Re: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 7:56 pm 
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There is already a comprehensive thread on this subject so I will merge thsi thread with it.

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 Post subject: Re: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:27 pm 
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Invisible wrote:
If things get that bad that you are justifiably afraid of going shopping, there might not be any shops left open anyway. However...

Given that ebola is a biohazard Lv4 virus, and that healthcare workers in Lv2 PPE are getting it, I think we have to forget simple paper masks. They simply don't seal well enough to start with. Better than absolutely nothing, but if you think you are at risk it's just not enough.

IF ebola was actually spreading to that degree, the minimum kit I would be going out in would be a full face respirator like a 3M 6000 series or similar, with P100 filters. That's not all that expensive, but it is bulky so might not be what you had in mind as 'quick items to have on hand'.

You'll also need head-to-toe coverage from something like a tychem coverall, or a well-sealed plastic raincoat and pants. Plus gloves, preferably a few layers.

The biggest problem you'll face is decontamination before taking all that kit off. Why decontaminate? Well, if ebola is enough of a concern that you're wearing the kit, then you don't know if the guy coughing behind you in the checkout line has flu or ebola. If it's ebola, you might now be covered with specks of aerosolised virus. You just don't know, so you have to assume the worst, every time you get near people.

Decontamination generally means spraying/brushing very thoroughly with dilute bleach. Really, it needs a helper to do effectively (who also has to be wearing PPE of course). Then you can take the kit off. If you are decontaminating yourself it's more complicated.

So... no easy answer unfortunately. Let's just hope things don't go that far. My plan is just to stay indoors if it does.


The water filter is easier. If you want something that will remove virii, then I would recommend the lifesaver bottle. It's about as easy to use as it gets, and does remove virii which most filter don't. It doesn't add any nasty chemicals either, which iodine-based filters can.


Um. If you really, really want to go with full face mask and p100 to go to the grocery store, it is a free country.

But going to the grocery store is a far cry from repeatedly entering the room of a patient literally dying from Ebola and cleaning up their viral-particle-filled bodily fluids, or, more specifically, sticking a tube down their airway or needles into their arteries and veins. This is the situation in which the health care workers so far have been infected.

Your point about needing to know how to take off your PPE and decontaminating is correct, tho even with someone to spray the dilute bleach I would be following the directions about how to take off PPE without contaminating myself. Also, if it's not disposable, you're then going to need a procedure to finish decontaminating the non-disposable bits.

My feeling is that, this is called for if you are providing direct care to a patient with Ebola, not so much for grocery store trips where I can successfully evade other people's bodily fluids with a very high degree of reliability.

Ebola, thank God, is not flu, or even measles. If you want to freak yourself out, look up how long and how much flu virus will hang in the air after somebody with flu has left the room. (If we were discussing a flu strain with H5N1-type mortality with the same human-to-human transmission as a regular seasonal flu, I would agree with you about using at least an N95.)

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 Post subject: Re: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:52 pm 
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duodecima wrote:
spray the dilute bleach

What is the bleach/water ratio to use?


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 Post subject: Re: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 10:58 pm 
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zombiepreparation wrote:
duodecima wrote:
spray the dilute bleach

What is the bleach/water ratio to use?



Per link above a good disinfectant guide.

http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ ... rfaces.pdf

A 1 in 10 solution (1 part 4% to 6% house hold bleach to 9 parts of water) will work nicely but it is caustic and will bleach clothing. Still for floors and decontamination rinse (while still wearing PPE) this will work well.

a 1 in 50 or a 1 in 100 solution will work on surfaces that cannot take the caustic solutions although they will require longer exposure time to the solution.

If you take a 10 part solution and add it to 9 parts of water you can make a 1 to 100 solution.

http://www.cdc.gov/hicpac/Disinfection_ ... ction.html

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 Post subject: Re: EBOLA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 11:09 pm 
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zombiepreparation wrote:
duodecima wrote:
spray the dilute bleach

What is the bleach/water ratio to use?


http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/130596/1/WHO_HIS_SDS_2014.4_eng.pdf?ua=1&ua=1&ua=1
I cannot recommend enough the WHO "Interim Infection Prevention and Control Guidance for Filovirus Haemorrhagic Fever In Health Care Settings, with Focus On Ebola" which is linked above.

They don't, interestingly, recommend the spraying with bleach, I just know that it's been done in some wards. They definitely DO recommend a "spotter" - a trained person to WATCH you put on and take off your stuff, to make sure you get it right. This is NOT a step commonly done in the US when we gown up for other things, it is something I suspect is more important than we might guess to getting 100% adherence.

The spraying with bleach would NOT render things like obvious bloody/poopy bits of your gear safe to touch, btw.

They reference 0.5% bleach for disinfecting non-disposable thinks like boots and rubber aprons and wiping down environmental surfaces after cleaning (including the outsides of body bags). Even more dilute than that for laundering contaminated linens.

"Annex 6" is a page about how to figure dilutions for making a weaker bleach solutions out of ANY strength of bleach OR out of calcium hypocholorite powder (aka pool shock. see this thread. viewtopic.php?f=14&t=88480&hilit=pool+shock It's the reason I don't have more than a couple gallons of actual bleach on hand, I've got this as back up to mix my own. Very Carefully, of course.) "Annex 6" is another thing I should print and laminate.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 13, 2014 9:27 am 
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A ton of good info in this thread.

Learn it. Except for the formulas and charts, don't just print it out thinking you will have the time to read it when the crap hits the fan.
Learn it and practice it somehow.

If you want to go all the way how about this idea.

Assemble and put on your 'hazmat' suit.
Close your eyes and have a buddy splatter you with some water based paint.
Open your eyes and take a walk or do a few things you think you might do while in the suit.
Before the paint dries try to take off the suit without getting contaminated.
You might not have a decontamination area where you end up taking off the suit so try it with and with out the spray off and buddy cleaning you.

A full suit is a bitch to work in.
Believe me. I was in the AF and spend a few 12+ hour days in full suit during exercises.
Good thing I was young, in shape and able to drink all I wanted while in it.
I made it all 14 hours once without going to the can. Once.
Going without food was fine. As long as the water is available.

I couldn't go 4 hours now just walking. Slow.

Plus I don't plan on walking out of any contaminated areas.
I don't think the authorities will let me for one. And if they catch me I bet they will place me in a shelter for the rest of the time. You know that place they put all the other contaminated people.
Best to just stay put if they close off the area.



Our best friend for something like Ebola is probably isolation and Purel.
Good hygiene is the best thing. In Western nations we have access to good clean water and soap. Use them all you can.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 13, 2014 10:31 am 
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raptor wrote:
That is a good question. I will tell you what I have and suggest. I am sure others can chime in here.

My supplies are simple rain suits. They come in wide variety of colors. I have light blue ones for exactly the reason you mentioned. To be somewhat discrete.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Panoply-Work-We ... 0778323528

That and plain rain boots coupled with a combination of chemical gloves and latex exam gloves should provide protection. I have elbow length gloves because there are situations where that alone is adequate.


Do you guys think GoreTex ski bibs would work for protective trousers? I'm challenged at finding cheap rain gear because I'm 6' 7", and I already have the ski bib. :)

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:04 am 
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raistlin wrote:

Do you guys think GoreTex ski bibs would work for protective trousers? I'm challenged at finding cheap rain gear because I'm 6' 7", and I already have the ski bib. :)


The problems with Gore-tex are that a.) it is permeable and may absorb a nasty and make decontamination difficult b.) that and depending upon the ambient temperature it may hot as hell.

You could address the first by adding an apron, poncho or some type of front bib which would make decontamination easier. That said remember gear is no good without the proper procedures for getting out of the contaminated gear and getting it decontaminated, unless you plan on immediately discarding the item.


Edited to add:

The thought occurred to me that water repellent coatings like Never Wet may be a useful addition to PPE to repel any contaminants and have them drop off faster. Now it would likewise repel disinfectants but there may be situations where this product and others like it may be useful.

http://www.neverwet.com/

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 13, 2014 1:26 pm 
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raptor wrote:
raistlin wrote:

Do you guys think GoreTex ski bibs would work for protective trousers? I'm challenged at finding cheap rain gear because I'm 6' 7", and I already have the ski bib. :)


The problems with Gore-tex are that a.) it is permeable and may absorb a nasty and make decontamination difficult


That's what I was wondering about. A lot of rain gear is also breathable (e.g. Froggs).

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