A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

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A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by Nightwing » Wed Mar 16, 2011 12:03 am

Yet another reason why prepping for "zombies" is a smart move.

"Far outside the disaster zone, stores are running out of necessities, raising government fears that hoarding may hurt the delivery of emergency food aid to those who really need it.

"The situation is hysterical," said Tomonao Matsuo, spokesman for instant noodle maker Nissin Foods"



http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Panic-buy ... l?x=0&.v=4
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by funkychicken » Wed Mar 16, 2011 12:44 am

Yep a lot of people are in that OH SH*T mode. "I didn't plan for this, and it is getting worse. I better buy a year supply right now!" It's like trying to buy a fan during a heat wave. Except you went to the store for tooth picks for your party. No tooth picks on the shelves and the tooth pick fairy is back logged for the next month. I'd say Japan is going to have a long road to recovery ahead of them. I know a lot of people were prepared for a disaster there. But what can you do if your entire house gets washed away with all your supplies in it? I guess you can't plan for everything. I was wondering why all there power plants are on the eastern side of the country? Where all the sunami's hit? Or are they just showing the ones affected by the earthquake.
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by Kommander » Wed Mar 16, 2011 1:10 am

Note though that as bad as it is there have been no reports of widespread looting or civil unrest. It is interesting to compare the local populaces reaction to this disaster to other such as Katrina.
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by urthshu » Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:54 am

Kommander wrote:Note though that as bad as it is there have been no reports of widespread looting or civil unrest. It is interesting to compare the local populaces reaction to this disaster to other such as Katrina.
Sure, but can you go past that to look at what tips or lessons to draw from that observation? National-level comparisons don't work all that well since Katrina affected more than one State yet only N.O. was reported as having issues with looting, etc. Both Katrina and this have hit coastal areas with a mix of urban and rural elements, as well.

Even so it only goes so far as every disaster is different.

ETA: Biggest lesson ought to be for the US MEDIA. We tend to hype everything and inflate death tolls, etc then revise down, which promotes early panic. Their media appears to downplay and report only things are that are strictly known as fact, then revise upward. That might do a lot to set tone.
Last edited by urthshu on Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by Seven2 » Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:57 am

^ I've been waiting for somebody to go there. Image
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by JTNieman » Wed Mar 16, 2011 8:00 am

The news reports this like it's a bad thing people are grocery shopping more than normal.

Sorry, but they're legally purchasing available foods. Better than holding the store at gunpoint to take their milk and eggs. If there is a distribution problem, complain to the distributor, not about the people. If you want the food in the markets to go to the core of the disaster, then buy it and take it there yourself or have stores deny sales to non-charity/government buyers or something.

If it's on the shelf it's for sale. Period.

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by urthshu » Wed Mar 16, 2011 8:05 am

Yup. They're NOT 'hoarders', they're consumers.

Hoarding implies they're just buying it up to sit on the pile and laughing it up at others' misery. Nobody does that except for preppers.
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by bgnad » Wed Mar 16, 2011 2:35 pm

funkychicken wrote:Yep a lot of people are in that OH SH*T mode. "I didn't plan for this, and it is getting worse. I better buy a year supply right now!" It's like trying to buy a fan during a heat wave. Except you went to the store for tooth picks for your party. No tooth picks on the shelves and the tooth pick fairy is back logged for the next month. I'd say Japan is going to have a long road to recovery ahead of them. I know a lot of people were prepared for a disaster there. But what can you do if your entire house gets washed away with all your supplies in it? I guess you can't plan for everything. I was wondering why all there power plants are on the eastern side of the country? Where all the sunami's hit? Or are they just showing the ones affected by the earthquake.
I hate to sound cold here, but your height above sea level and your distance from the 100 year flood zone should be part of your prep planning. Admittedly many people don't have much choice, but it *IS* something you need to think about and it should be part of your search critiera when you are looking to relocate.

Tuck this one into your little black book of planning tips folks.

[I mean, heck!I think about meteor strikes in my planning, how's that for paranoid 8-)]

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by JTNieman » Wed Mar 16, 2011 2:40 pm

urthshu wrote:Yup. They're NOT 'hoarders', they're consumers.

Hoarding implies they're just buying it up to sit on the pile and laughing it up at others' misery. Nobody does that except for preppers.
uh.

...

Trolling? Hopefully?

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by andygates » Wed Mar 16, 2011 2:57 pm

Tell you one side effect we haven't seen: looting or violence. When asked in interview, people have looked surprised and said "this is Japan."
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by urthshu » Wed Mar 16, 2011 6:18 pm

JamesCannon wrote:
urthshu wrote:Yup. They're NOT 'hoarders', they're consumers.

Hoarding implies they're just buying it up to sit on the pile and laughing it up at others' misery. Nobody does that except for preppers.
uh.

...

Trolling? Hopefully?
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by raptor » Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:37 pm

bgnad wrote: I hate to sound cold here, but your height above sea level and your distance from the 100 year flood zone should be part of your prep planning. Admittedly many people don't have much choice, but it *IS* something you need to think about and it should be part of your search critiera when you are looking to relocate.

Tuck this one into your little black book of planning tips folks.

[I mean, heck!I think about meteor strikes in my planning, how's that for paranoid 8-)]

-Bubba Man
Yes the risks that you face should be assessed and understood before you move to a new location.

For instance the propensity of tornadoes is also a risk that should be assessed by those who live in tornado alley.

Any place will have risks, it is impossible to find places devoid of risk. The key is not that risks exists but rather to understand the risks and take proper precautions to deal with or otherwise mitigate the risk.

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by Torvald » Sat Mar 19, 2011 12:17 am

raptor wrote:
bgnad wrote: I hate to sound cold here, but your height above sea level and your distance from the 100 year flood zone should be part of your prep planning. Admittedly many people don't have much choice, but it *IS* something you need to think about and it should be part of your search critiera when you are looking to relocate.

Tuck this one into your little black book of planning tips folks.

[I mean, heck!I think about meteor strikes in my planning, how's that for paranoid 8-)]

-Bubba Man
Yes the risks that you face should be assessed and understood before you move to a new location.

For instance the propensity of tornadoes is also a risk that should be assessed by those who live in tornado alley.

Any place will have risks, it is impossible to find places devoid of risk. The key is not that risks exists but rather to understand the risks and take proper precautions to deal with or otherwise mitigate the risk.
Also be aware that risks change, what was not a problem 10 years ago could now be a problem waiting to happen, that new construction project may change the water shed in the area, could put an un accounted for strain on the electric or sewage systems that were designed and put in place 20 years ago. Just because last winter you didn't flood or had perfect power dose not mean this year will be the same. not what has built up around you and how it might effect your plans.

45 years we had a dry basment, they "fixed" the main lines under the large road 4 blocks over and now it dose not flood out in heavy rains but we get water in the basement.

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sat Mar 19, 2011 5:58 am

Excellent point. I just found out, via Yahoo! that the nuclear facility to my south, and I AM within the evacuation radius, has been listed as "the most vulnerable plant in America" in regards to an earthquake like Japan has just experienced. I remember when they started putting the thing up! They pump (currently) the coolant water into the Hudson River, and it affects the wildlife, because of the warm temperatures it introduces, compared to the rest of the water. Steam venting has raised alarm several times in the past, even though they SAY no radiation was released during any of those events. They also claim that it was designed with the worst quake the area has ever experienced in mind- what I want to know is, the worst quake WHEN? They've only been measuring them with any kind of standard for what? less than 100 years? The area's only been settled for THREE hundred. I'm pretty sure the local Indians before that experienced quakes, said "holy crap!", and then got on with their lives- they didn't have a way to measure it, and they weren't big on written records.

My sources of comfort regarding it are these: so far, nothing's happened to indicate that IP3 is going to go all China Syndrome on us anytime soon, it's a VERY heavily and closely inspected industry, and I'm upwind of it, during normal weather patterns for the area. That, and my distance (combined with mountainous terrain) should keep me out of harm's way should it have a similar problem to the Japanese plant. Not as long a list of "feel good" things as I'd like, but you have to deal with what you got, not with what you'd LIKE to have. Somehow, the chance it will be decommissioned and shut down in 20 years doesn't fill me with a lot of hope, either.
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by raptor » Sat Mar 19, 2011 9:58 am

These changes are another reason to sit down annually and spend an hour or two reviewing and updating your "known risks" profile in your risk assessment plan.

Another common change is health conditions. A family member may become ill and require special needs in case a bug out is necessary, may need an electrically operated piece of equipment or require medications that require special handling.

Life is not without risk, prepping does not guarantee elimination of risk, planning does however give you a better probability of success or at least survival.

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by bgnad » Mon Mar 21, 2011 11:31 am

Torvald wrote:
raptor wrote:
bgnad wrote: I hate to sound cold here, but your height above sea level and your distance from the 100 year flood zone should be part of your prep planning. Admittedly many people don't have much choice, but it *IS* something you need to think about and it should be part of your search critiera when you are looking to relocate.

Tuck this one into your little black book of planning tips folks.

[I mean, heck!I think about meteor strikes in my planning, how's that for paranoid 8-)]

-Bubba Man
Yes the risks that you face should be assessed and understood before you move to a new location.

For instance the propensity of tornadoes is also a risk that should be assessed by those who live in tornado alley.

Any place will have risks, it is impossible to find places devoid of risk. The key is not that risks exists but rather to understand the risks and take proper precautions to deal with or otherwise mitigate the risk.


Also be aware that risks change, what was not a problem 10 years ago could now be a problem waiting to happen, that new construction project may change the water shed in the area, could put an un accounted for strain on the electric or sewage systems that were designed and put in place 20 years ago. Just because last winter you didn't flood or had perfect power dose not mean this year will be the same. not what has built up around you and how it might effect your plans.

45 years we had a dry basment, they "fixed" the main lines under the large road 4 blocks over and now it dose not flood out in heavy rains but we get water in the basement.
Good points all. As Raptor said, I think a lot about tornadoes just as he does hurricanes and just as people in California (well people everywhere) should about earthquakes. I do recon that there are similarities in Hurricane and Tsunami considerations. when your less that 50' above sea level, you need to work a little harder against the big wet wave :( as well as keeping an eye on what your neighbors are doing to you. :(
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by Shadowshi » Wed Mar 23, 2011 5:58 pm

I haven't noticed the stores being out of anything around here except for bananas and I think it was before the Japan happening. We keep a rather well stocked pantry compared to a lot of people. But I was just thinking of what we should stock up on in case an earthquake or other disaster (like zombies! lol) happened. That of course includes a bug-out-bag. How much would you think someone should pack in the back of a car for a just-in-case scenario? If you feel like I should be pointed elsewhere please do! I'm also interested in all the items one should have in the car for any type of just-in-case scenario.

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by raptor » Wed Mar 23, 2011 6:01 pm

Shadowshi wrote:I haven't noticed the stores being out of anything around here except for bananas and I think it was before the Japan happening. We keep a rather well stocked pantry compared to a lot of people. But I was just thinking of what we should stock up on in case an earthquake or other disaster (like zombies! lol) happened. That of course includes a bug-out-bag. How much would you think someone should pack in the back of a car for a just-in-case scenario? If you feel like I should be pointed elsewhere please do! I'm also interested in all the items one should have in the car for any type of just-in-case scenario.
There are many articles on Bug Out Bags (a.k.a. BOBs), Get Home Bags and similar preparations. Spend some time reading this forum and you will find a wealth of information.

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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:41 am

raptor wrote:These changes are another reason to sit down annually and spend an hour or two reviewing and updating your "known risks" profile in your risk assessment plan.

Another common change is health conditions. A family member may become ill and require special needs in case a bug out is necessary, may need an electrically operated piece of equipment or require medications that require special handling.

Life is not without risk, prepping does not guarantee elimination of risk, planning does however give you a better probability of success or at least survival.
I'm certainly no expert in this, but- I decided to perform a little experiment. I sat the entire household down (well, we didn't include the baby) to get a sort of opinion poll on risk assessment and the feelings on what the people in my household felt to be our major concerns. I won't clutter up this thread with it in full, but I will say that the results were interesting. Some of the things I considered to be rather serious, and obvious, concerns, the rest were not rating as high. The things that came in with tie scores were also interesting- Government collapse rated as high a probability as a medical emergency, such as a broken arm. Others that tied scores were for inverse reasons, high likelihood with low severity, vs. low likelihood with high severity, with some interesting things that overall rated the same.

This is by no means a scientific research method, but what I did was, I listed 23 forms of emergency situations, from house fire to EOTWAWKI-type events, then asked everyone to write a likelihood score based on a 1-10 range (10 being a lock), and severity, again 1-10 as a range (10 being worst). We then totaled the two scores in a third column, so the highest anything could rate would be a 20. We than added everyone's totals for each, and wrote out a new list, based on highest to lowest scores. Unexpected visitors then derailed the conversation, but I'm planning on another sit-down to follow this up with opinions on how we should best address each issue, and to assess where we stand on each one.

I'm sure I forgot something, but I figured that 23 was plenty of issues to worry about as it stood. Frankly, tsunami was about the ONLY natural disaster that did NOT make the list, because of our location. What DID make the list, was a breakdown in grocery supply chains, and the severity and likelihoods of that were listed rather high by everyone, one of the few things everyone was in pretty close agreement with.

Would there be enough interest in this to warrant my creating a thread on it? PM, please, to avoid de-railing this thread.
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Re: A side effect of the Earthquakes in Japan

Post by Stercutus » Sat Mar 26, 2011 4:03 pm

A couple of weeks into this and:

Shortages in Tokyo
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 ... 52852.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Gives an interesting insight into why there are shortage and something useful that we can think about:

http://www.timdesuyo.com/news/?p=86" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
To really get into the meat of what’s going on, you have to understand that Tokyo is a restaurant-based city. People here work long hours, and live in tiny apartments. Which means that a whole bunch of single professionals in Tokyo almost never cook. They just eat out. With the uncertainty of the restaurant situation, and with many restaurants closing earlier, and rumors of shortages, You had basically what happens to a local Super Wal-Mart when all the college students move back in. Instant ramen? Forget about finding any. Bread? Hard to come by. Potato Chips? Junk food? Gone.

To be fair, since the original panic, the grocery stores and convenience stores have done amazing jobs of restocking, and I’m sure they’re making money hand-over-fist in this whole thing. Also, to be fair, there’s something to be said for pre-packaged, non-perishable foods, if you’re expecting a disaster. But I wasn’t. Also, some of the foods that I’d expected to fly off the shelves, like canned fruits and vegetables, did not. Canned tomatoes (that I use for making soups and pasta sauce) were even on sale! Woot!
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