2018 Hurricane Season

Topics in this category pertain to planning. Discussions include how to prepare yourself, your family and your community for catastrophes and what you plan to do when they hit you.

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2018 Hurricane Season

Post by MPMalloy » Thu May 24, 2018 11:32 am

From NPR: NOAA Expects Hurricane Season For 2018 To Be Near Or Above Normal
May 24, 2018 12:13 PM ET By Camila Domonoske

Up to four major hurricanes could form in the Atlantic this hurricane season, according to the annual forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Overall, the season will likely be normal or somewhat more intense than normal, NOAA says, with a 25 percent chance that hurricane activity will be below normal.

Last year's hurricane season was one of the most active on record. NOAA is not expecting this season to be quite so bad — but an average season could do tremendous damage. That's especially true if a storm hits communities in Puerto Rico or along the Gulf Coast that are still struggling to recover from the devastation caused by Maria and Harvey last year.

The seasonal outlook can't predict landfall areas, but the forecasters warn that even an average season involves "quite a few hurricanes."

"We know certain areas have been compromised from last year's storm, and that makes hurricane preparedness ... even more important this year," says Gerry Bell, the lead hurricane season forecaster at the Climate Prediction Center.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the 2018 hurricane outlook on Thursday morning.

Neil Jacobs, the assistant secretary of commerce for environmental prediction and observation, says that NOAA predicts between 10 and 16 named storms, with sustained winds of 39 mph or higher.

The agency expects five to nine hurricanes, which have winds of 74 mph or higher. One to four of those are expected to be major hurricanes — Category 3 or higher.

There's also a chance that a weak El Niño could develop late in the summer, which would weaken the very end of the hurricane season, but there's no guarantee of that, NOAA says.

NOAA and FEMA recommend that members of the public make emergency and evacuation plans, and consider purchasing hurricane insurance.

Last year, NOAA initially predicted an extremely active season, forecasting 11 to 17 named storms — including up to nine hurricanes.

The actual season was right on the high end of that prediction range. There were 17 named storms, including 10 hurricanes.

NOAA slightly underestimated just how bad those hurricanes would be. They expected two to four major hurricanes; in fact, there were six major hurricanes, three of which made landfall as powerful storms.

Hurricane season hasn't officially started yet, but the storms are already brewing. NOAA's National Hurricane Center says there's "a high chance of a tropical or subtropical depression" forming in the Gulf of Mexico over Memorial Day weekend.

The names for Atlantic storms are defined by the World Meteorological Organization. There are six lists that rotate through the years, with names retired after particularly deadly storms. Here's this year's list:

Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sara
Tony
Valerie
William
NOAA Predicts 'Above-Normal' Activity In Atlantic Hurricane Season
May 25, 2017 12:23 PM ET By Bill Chappell

The Atlantic hurricane season could see between two and four major hurricanes in 2017, according to the latest forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. There's only a 20 percent chance that this season will be less active than normal, the agency says.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins June 1, but one named storm, Arlene, already hit land last month. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says it expects between 11 and 17 named storms (with sustained winds of 39 mph or higher), and from five to nine hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher) this season.

"The season could be comparable to last year, which was the most active since 2012 with 15 named storms," said Gerry Bell, the lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

The Atlantic season runs through Nov. 1. Toward the end of the 2016 hurricane season, a powerful storm, Hurricane Matthew, reached Category 5 status and brought destruction and flooding to an area that ranged from Haiti to the Carolinas and beyond.

NOAA says that in its 2017 forecast, it's expecting a weak or nonexistent El Nino and near- or above-average sea-surface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, among other factors.

There's still "considerable uncertainty" about conditions this season, the agency says, a point illustrated by comparable predictions for an above-normal season (45 percent) and a near-normal season (35 percent).

In the eastern Pacific and central Pacific hurricane basins, NOAA predicts an 80 percent chance of a near- or above-normal season for both regions.

From the weather agency:
"The eastern Pacific outlook also calls for a 70 percent probability of 14 to 20 named storms, of which 6 to 11 are expected to become hurricanes, including 3 to 7 major hurricanes. The central Pacific outlook calls for a 70 percent probability of 5 to 8 tropical cyclones, which includes tropical depressions, tropical storms and hurricanes."
Here's the list of 21 names that will be given to strong storms this year (the list is managed by the World Meteorological Organization):

Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irma
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rina
Sean
Tammy
Vince
Whitney

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by flybynight » Thu May 24, 2018 12:59 pm

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather- ... d/70005035


"Concern is growing that the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season may start early with the formation of Tropical Storm Alberto this Memorial Day holiday weekend. The southeastern United States may face a prolonged flood risk from this brewing storm."
As of now I bet you got me wrong

John Titor was right

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by raptor » Thu May 24, 2018 4:11 pm

Heads up GOM.


BTW a great site to use for maps.
http://spaghettimodels.com/


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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by Langenator » Thu May 24, 2018 4:17 pm

Fortunis Fortus Paratus

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by MPMalloy » Thu May 24, 2018 5:55 pm

raptor: Are you and yours doing anything special/different this season?

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by raptor » Thu May 24, 2018 10:17 pm

My plans remain the same with the sincere hope I do have any need for them.

Not bragging but I finished all of annual preps review last weekend.

Cycled out canned goods.
Filled the 55 gallon drum of drinking water.
Polished the generator diesel fuel.
Cycled out the old flash light batteries.

The only thing left undone are local government re-entry permits that they do not issue until May 25 this year. Picking those up tommorrow.

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by raptor » Fri May 25, 2018 12:59 pm

Well I guess I get to see how well my preps work for my place in South MS. This track puts the storm right over the farm. :roll:

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Last edited by raptor on Fri May 25, 2018 7:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by Stercutus » Fri May 25, 2018 3:36 pm

Looks like we will get the swing around of the Depression. Calling for flooding and up to a foot of rain.
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by RickOShea » Fri May 25, 2018 4:59 pm

I take a couple days off for a looong weekend, and its probably going to rain most of it. Oh well, we're behind a little bit on our average rainfall....hope my neighbor's sweet corn enjoys it.
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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by Stercutus » Fri May 25, 2018 5:38 pm

RickOShea wrote:I take a couple days off for a looong weekend, and its probably going to rain most of it. Oh well, we're behind a little bit on our average rainfall....hope my neighbor's sweet corn enjoys it.
Beach houses on the coast are renting for cleaning fees this weekend. If you don't mind being cooped up all weekend you could get out of your house and change the scenery.
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by RickOShea » Fri May 25, 2018 5:51 pm

Stercutus wrote:
RickOShea wrote:I take a couple days off for a looong weekend, and its probably going to rain most of it. Oh well, we're behind a little bit on our average rainfall....hope my neighbor's sweet corn enjoys it.
Beach houses on the coast are renting for cleaning fees this weekend. If you don't mind being cooped up all weekend you could get out of your house and change the scenery.
LOL. Except for a couple fishin' trips during red snapper season and the July Blue Angels beach show, I do my best to stay away from that mad house between Spring Break and Labor day.
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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by Stercutus » Fri May 25, 2018 6:04 pm

RickOShea wrote:
Stercutus wrote:
RickOShea wrote:I take a couple days off for a looong weekend, and its probably going to rain most of it. Oh well, we're behind a little bit on our average rainfall....hope my neighbor's sweet corn enjoys it.
Beach houses on the coast are renting for cleaning fees this weekend. If you don't mind being cooped up all weekend you could get out of your house and change the scenery.
LOL. Except for a couple fishin' trips during red snapper season and the July Blue Angels beach show, I do my best to stay away from that mad house between Spring Break and Labor day.
Yeah but that is the point, there won't be anyone there. :oh:
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by RickOShea » Fri May 25, 2018 6:22 pm

Stercutus wrote:
RickOShea wrote:
Stercutus wrote:
RickOShea wrote:I take a couple days off for a looong weekend, and its probably going to rain most of it. Oh well, we're behind a little bit on our average rainfall....hope my neighbor's sweet corn enjoys it.
Beach houses on the coast are renting for cleaning fees this weekend. If you don't mind being cooped up all weekend you could get out of your house and change the scenery.
LOL. Except for a couple fishin' trips during red snapper season and the July Blue Angels beach show, I do my best to stay away from that mad house between Spring Break and Labor day.
Yeah but that is the point, there won't be anyone there. :oh:
Oh, they'll still be there. Traffic heading south has been as thick as usual. The single red flags are already up.....as soon as the double reds go up, the LEOs will be busy snatching yahoos out of the water.

So far, the only "mandatory evacuations" I've heard about are at the camp grounds at the Gulf Islands National Park.
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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by MPMalloy » Sat May 26, 2018 5:28 pm

From NPR: Florida Is In A State Of Emergency As Subtropical Storm Alberto Approaches
May 26, 20185:11 PM ET By Sasha Ingber

Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in all 67 counties on Saturday in preparation for Subtropical Storm Alberto.

"As we continue to monitor Subtropical Storm Alberto's northward path toward Florida, it is critically important that all Florida counties have every available resource to keep families safe and prepare for the torrential rain and severe flooding this storm will bring," Scott said in a written statement.

He added, "If any Florida family doesn't have an emergency preparedness plan, now is the time to act."

Alberto is expected to travel across the eastern Gulf of Mexico Saturday night through Monday and approach the northern part of the Gulf where it could make landfall Monday night.

Regardless of its path and intensity, Alberto expected to bring heavy rains of more than 10 inches and flash flooding to western Cuba and southern Florida, the National Hurricane Center said.

A storm surge watch is in effect along the U.S. gulf coast, from Crystal River to the mouth of the Mississippi River. Water could reach up to 4 feet above ground in some areas if the peak surge occurs during high tide, the agency said on Facebook.

A tornado "or two" may occur over the Florida Keys and parts of southwestern Florida later Saturday afternoon or evening.

On Thursday, the National Hurricane Center caused eyebrows to raise when it estimated a 90 percent chance that a subtropical or tropical cyclone would form in the central or eastern part of the Gulf of Mexico over the weekend.

On Friday morning, the agency announced that an area of low pressure in the Caribbean had developed into Subtropical Storm Alberto with maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour. By Saturday morning, the storm was gathering strength as it moved north.

Between Hurricane Harvey in Texas, Irma in the Caribbean and southeastern U.S. and Maria in Puerto Rico, last year was one of the most active hurricane seasons on record, said The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

NOAA does not expect 2018 to be quite as busy, but it could still wreak havoc on human life and infrastructure.

One of the most deadly natural disasters in U.S. history occurred in Florida 90 years ago. In 1928, the Okeechobee Hurricane caused the death of at least 2,500 people.

"Nobody seemed to be too much alarmed," a survivor told the Sun Sentinel, "until the water started coming in." According to the paper, politicians at the time downplayed the storm's severity to keep tourists flocking to Florida as a vacation spot.

In a visit to Panama City Beach yesterday, Scott said, "We have already moved some high water vehicles up to the panhandle from Fish and Wildlife."

Alberto is the first named storm of 2018, and it comes days before the Atlantic hurricane season officially starts on June 1.

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by raptor » Sun May 27, 2018 9:08 am

Yes this one looks like AL & FL is the most likely target.
FYI I am in South MS and the cloud cover is scattered maybe 30% and the barometer is 29.9 and has been falling very slowly. The wind is calm. There is no indication of a tropical storm or in this case a sub tropical storm.

Other than the falling barometer and of course radar and real-time tracking of the storm there would be no indication that it is on the horizon.

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by RickOShea » Sun May 27, 2018 3:12 pm

RickOShea wrote:Oh, they'll still be there. Traffic heading south has been as thick as usual. The single red flags are already up.....as soon as the double reds go up, the LEOs will be busy snatching yahoos out of the water.

A teenage boy and girl pulled from the water inside Perdido Pass near the east jetties around noon Sunday. Surf rescue was notified by a boater who assisted. Both teens were “struggling” against the currents according to Brett Lesinger with OB surf rescue. Red flags continue to fly along all Baldwin County beaches warning of a high risk of rip currents and a strong west running current.


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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by MPMalloy » Sun May 27, 2018 5:03 pm

From NPR: Florida, Alabama In A State Of Emergency As Subtropical Storm Alberto Approaches
May 26, 2018 5:11 PM ET By Sasha Ingber & Emma Bowman

Updated at 7:01 p.m. ET

Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in all 67 counties on Saturday in preparation for Subtropical Storm Alberto.

"As we continue to monitor Subtropical Storm Alberto's northward path toward Florida, it is critically important that all Florida counties have every available resource to keep families safe and prepare for the torrential rain and severe flooding this storm will bring," Scott said in a written statement.

He added, "If any Florida family doesn't have an emergency preparedness plan, now is the time to act."

Alberto is expected to travel across the eastern Gulf of Mexico Saturday night through Monday and approach the northern part of the Gulf where it could make landfall Monday night.

Regardless of its path and intensity, Alberto expected to bring heavy rains of more than 10 inches and flash flooding to western Cuba and southern Florida, the National Hurricane Center said.

A storm surge watch is in effect along the U.S. gulf coast, from Crystal River to the mouth of the Mississippi River. Water could reach up to 4 feet above ground in some areas if the peak surge occurs during high tide, the agency said on Facebook.

A tornado "or two" may occur over the Florida Keys and parts of southwestern Florida later Saturday afternoon or evening.

On Thursday, the National Hurricane Center caused eyebrows to raise when it estimated a 90 percent chance that a subtropical or tropical cyclone would form in the central or eastern part of the Gulf of Mexico over the weekend.

On Friday morning, the agency announced that an area of low pressure in the Caribbean had developed into Subtropical Storm Alberto with maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour. By Saturday morning, the storm was gathering strength as it moved north.

Between Hurricane Harvey in Texas, Irma in the Caribbean and southeastern U.S. and Maria in Puerto Rico, last year was one of the most active hurricane seasons on record, said The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

NOAA does not expect 2018 to be quite as busy, but it could still wreak havoc on human life and infrastructure.

One of the most deadly natural disasters in U.S. history occurred in Florida 90 years ago. In 1928, the Okeechobee Hurricane caused the death of at least 2,500 people.

"Nobody seemed to be too much alarmed," a survivor told the Sun Sentinel, "until the water started coming in." According to the paper, politicians at the time downplayed the storm's severity to keep tourists flocking to Florida as a vacation spot.

In a visit to Panama City Beach yesterday, Scott said, "We have already moved some high water vehicles up to the panhandle from Fish and Wildlife."

Later on Saturday, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey also issued a state of emergency, effective at 6:00 a.m. local time Sunday, for the following counties: Autauga, Baldwin, Barbour, Bibb, Bullock, Butler, Chambers, Chilton, Choctaw, Clarke, Coffee, Conecuh, Coosa, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Dallas, Elmore, Escambia, Geneva, Greene, Hale, Henry, Houston, Lee, Lowndes, Macon, Marengo, Mobile, Monroe, Montgomery, Perry, Pickens, Pike, Russell, Sumter, Tallapoosa, Tuscaloosa, Washington and Wilcox.

The National Weather Service projects Alberto will hit Alabama starting Saturday, with the state's heaviest rains falling closer to the coast, through the middle of next week. Some locations could see 10 -15 inches, threatening severe flash and river flooding. A large portion of the state is also facing the threat of tornadoes, near the coast Sunday, through at least Tuesday night in north Alabama, according to the governor.

"All Alabamians should take time to be prepared for the potential of significant flooding. I have directed essential state agencies to be on the ready should they be needed over the next couple of days," Gov. Ivey said in a written statement.

Those state agencies include the Emergency Operations Center in Clanton, and the Alabama National Guard, which has mobilized its High Water Evacuation Teams.

"There is still uncertainty of where landfall will occur, which will likely be late Monday or early Tuesday morning," Director of Alabama Emergency Management Agency Brian E. Hastings said, but he urged residents and tourists to stay informed on the latest regional forecast.

Alberto is the first named storm of 2018, and it comes days before the Atlantic hurricane season officially starts on June 1.

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by Stercutus » Sun May 27, 2018 5:32 pm

It has started raining here. I expect it to end around Wednesday. On the upside it is perfect timing for the fruit trees and blueberries.
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Jun 06, 2018 3:29 pm

From NPR: Hurricanes Are Moving More Slowly, Which Means More Damage
June 6, 2018 1:18 PM ET By Rebecca Hersher

Hurricanes are moving more slowly over both land and water, and that's bad news for communities in their path.

In the past 70 years, tropical cyclones around the world have slowed down 10 percent, and in some regions of the world, the change has been even more significant, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

That means storms are spending more time hanging out, battering buildings with wind and dropping more rain.

"The slowdown over land is what's really going to effect people," says James Kossin, the author of the study and a tropical cyclone specialist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He points to Hurricane Harvey's effect on Houston as an example of what slower storms can mean for cities.

"Hurricane Harvey last year was a real outlier in terms of the amount of rain it dropped," he explains. "And the amount of rain it dropped was due, almost entirely, to the fact that it moved so slowly."

Harvey dumped rain on southeast Texas for more than a week after it made landfall in August 2017. As much as 60 inches fell on some parts of the Houston area. At least 93 people died as a result of the storm.

The new research suggests slow-moving tropical storms such as Harvey are becoming more common because of global climate change. Climate change is causing the poles get warmer, which in turn affects the atmospheric pressure. There is less and less difference in pressure between the poles and the tropics, and that causes the big currents of wind between the two areas to slow down.

Storms ride on those currents of wind, kind of like a boat in a stream. "The wind itself that carries the tropical cyclone within it is slowing down, and therefore the tropical cyclones are slowing down," Kossin explains.

"This paper is very timely," says Christina Patricola, a climate scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who was not involved in the research. She says people who study hurricanes have traditionally focused on storm frequency and wind speed — but that rainfall is an increasingly important piece of the puzzle.

"This is really important for regional totals for rainfall," she says. "The implication here is that if tropical cyclones are moving more slowly they have the potential to leave more rainfall."

Another study, published last month by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, analyzed 22 recent hurricanes and found similar results, predicting that the storms of the future will spin more quickly, move sideways more slowly and bring more rain.

A storm slowing down even 10 percent can lead to twice as much rain as previous storms might have brought to a particular area, because warmer air and warmer water mean storms are carrying more water vapor than they used to.

And Kossin says slower storms are dangerous for other reasons.

"If you think about it, all the things about a tropical cyclone visiting your neighborhood, they're all bad. We don't want them to last very long," he explains.

"If the wind's blowing very hard against the structure and it blows a few more hours than it would have, the likelihood of knocking that structure down increases. You get more rainfall, you get more wind damage. You also get more storm surge. Slower storms will have a tendency to push a larger wall of water in front of them. So it's really a triple threat."

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by MPMalloy » Thu Aug 23, 2018 8:53 am

From FEMA: Daily Operations Briefing - Thursday, August 23, 2018
8:30 a.m. EDT


It opens up as a PDF. I signed up for these some time ago & I get them every day. Check out Email Updates.


ETA: From NPR: Powerful Hurricane Lane Lumbers Toward Hawaii As Residents Prepare
August 23, 2018 6:13 AM ET By James Doubek

Hawaii residents are bracing as Hurricane Lane slowly neared the islands Thursday.

Lane, a Category 4 storm moving northwest at 7 mph with maximum sustained winds of 145 mph, will have its center "move very close to or over the main Hawaiian Islands" Thursday through Friday, the National Weather Service said Wednesday night local time.

Oahu island, which includes the capital Honolulu and most of the state's population, is under a hurricane warning, along with Maui County and Hawaii County. A hurricane watch is in effect for Kauai County.

The National Weather Service in Honolulu reported rainfall on the Big Island already reaching 8 inches in 12 hours late Wednesday.

Lane is expected to remain a hurricane "as it approaches the islands," according to the agency. Hurricane-force winds will extend up to 40 miles out from the storm's center; tropical-storm-force winds will extend up to 140 miles.

"We still are expecting wind, rain, flooding effects that would affect statewide. We want to assure you that federal state and county emergency responders are working in coordination to keep the community safe," Hawaii Gov. David Ige said Wednesday.

State officials opened shelters on Wednesday with more opening on Thursday, The Associated Press reported.

Hawaii has had warnings about hurricanes before, though the last storm with significant damage was Hurricane Iniki in 1992. Officials are concerned that people have been complacent about preparations.

Davelle Finau of Oahu says she's not too concerned about the storm.

"Filling up [the] tank and stuff. Where you going to go with a full tank of gas? It's a small island. You're just going to go up the mountain and come right back down," Finau told NPR's Adrian Florido.

Even so, many residents are following recommendations to stock two weeks' worth of supplies. Grocery stores have been packed, and some gas stations have had long lines, Adrian says.

Tropical storm and hurricane conditions will occur over the course of the day Thursday on the Big Island and in Maui County, while Oahu will see those conditions Thursday night into Friday.

Rain is expected to accumulate to 10 to 20 inches and more than 30 inches in certain areas, the NWS said.

The governor's office said Wednesday that a presidential disaster declaration was approved for the state, which enables the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to take certain actions.

Park closures in much of the state go into effect Thursday. Public schools and some highways will be closed as well.

The governor said commercial harbors would also close and ordered boats to leave before the storm. "This is because the harbors are our lifeline to essential food and products," he said on Twitter.

Authorities warned residents on the coasts to be especially cautious — the weather service said large waves and a storm surge would mean water levels 2 to 4 feet above normal tide levels in certain shores facing south and west.

The weather service said some shorelines are likely to face "significant coastal erosion" because of "very large and damaging surf."

FEMA warned residents on shores to secure their boats and watch for salt damage to windows and doors, among other tips.

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by Langenator » Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:19 am

Unlike Florida or anywhere else on the mainland, in Hawaii, there really isn't anywhere to evacuate too. Maybe the whatever the leeward side of the island is.

And things like power line repair trucks can't just drive in from the mainland to help.

I know the Naval Reserve fleet has a fast Ro-Ro ship in Tacoma, and another in SF. Maybe they'll spin one or more of those up to help.
Fortunis Fortus Paratus

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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by MPMalloy » Fri Aug 24, 2018 9:08 am

From NPR: Floods Hit Big Island As Other Parts Of Hawaii Brace For Hurricane
August 24, 2018 5:24 AM ET By James Doubek

Flooding hit parts of Hawaii's Big Island Thursday as residents of Hawaii's other islands prepared for the slow-moving Hurricane Lane to bring strong winds and heavy rains.

The National Weather Service said "extreme flooding" was happening on Hawaii's Big Island — more than 2 feet of rain had fallen in some areas and large parts of the island were under a flash flood warning Thursday night.

Hurricane Lane was a Category 3, with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph and was moving slowly, at 6 mph, moving north toward the islands Thursday night — it's expected to remain a "dangerous" hurricane, the weather service said.

Hawaii's governor, David Ige, told residents to avoid flood waters "due to possible overflowing cesspools, sewer, manholes, pesticides, animal fecal matter, dead animals, pathogens, chemicals, and associated flood debris."

Emergency workers rescued five tourists visiting the Big Island from California, The Associated Press reported. They were renting a house in the town of Hilo when a gulch overflowed.

As of Thursday night, Hawaii's Civil Defense Agency said there was no mandatory evacuation in effect, though police and fire officials were advising residents in the Reeds Island area to evacuate. The agency listed six locations open as shelters.

The Big Island reportedly got close to 20 inches of rain in 24 hours.

Landslides and flooding forced roads to shut down on parts of Hawaii Island, another name for the Big Island. The island is the largest in land area of Hawaii's islands, but is largely rural.

More than 14 landslides hit Highway 19 in the area of Honomu forcing four road closures, the Hawaii Department of Transportation said. The government listed more than a dozen other road and bridge closures as of Thursday night.

On the next island over, Maui, the governor said at least 264 people, visitors and residents, were using evacuation shelters on Thursday night. Almost 2,000 people on the island lost power, according to Maui Electric, but for most, it was quickly restored.

Most of Hawaii's population lives on Oahu island, where Honolulu is located, and which is still awaiting the full force of the storm.

As workers piled sandbags and boarded up store windows, pictures showed many still enjoying the waves of Honolulu's Waikiki Beach Thursday. Police reportedly later told swimmers to get out of the water.

A hurricane warning was in effect for Oahu and Maui County late Thursday, and tropical storm conditions were already happening in both areas as of late Thursday local time.

"Hurricane conditions are expected over some areas of Maui County and Oahu starting Friday and continuing through Friday night. Tropical storm or hurricane conditions are possible on Kauai starting late Friday or Friday night," the NWS said.

Rainfall could reach 30 to 40 inches in certain areas of the Hawaiian Islands, the National Weather Service said, and accumulations more generally of 10 to 20 inches.

Surf on shorelines could reach as high as 20 feet, according to the AP.

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RickOShea
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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by RickOShea » Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:42 pm

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whisk.e.rebellion wrote: It's not what you say anymore. It's how you say it.

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raptor
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Re: 2018 Hurricane Season

Post by raptor » Tue Sep 04, 2018 2:03 pm

Since this is the first day of work after the Labor Day weekend most people just stayed home. We have magnificent sunny day partly cloudy with 30% to 50% cloud cover. The only strange thing is that the wind is out of the east @15kts and humidity is unusually low at 68%. Typically this time of year we have warm moist (80 to 95% humidity) coming from the south/southwest @ ~ 3kts to 6 kts.

These all show tides, wind and barometer readings.
A weather station in NOLA on Lake Pontchartrain's New Basin Canal. It is right across from the Southern Yacht Club
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/stati ... id=8761927

A weather Station at Bay Waveland Yacht Club, MS. This is to the west of Gulfport,MS
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/stati ... id=8747437

A weather station to the east of Gulfport, MS in Pascagoula,MS
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/stati ... id=8741533

This is a link to the Gulfport,MS municipal yacht harbor web camera.
http://www.gulfport-ms.gov:8085/gptclient.html

This is a link to the weather station at this Gulfport Yacht harbor. Based upon current projections Gordon should hit between Pass Christian and Biloxi,MS tonight.
http://www.gulfport-ms.gov/weather/


BTW the reason the marina is almost empty is because they have ordered all of their tenants to leave and those who do not leave are facing a $1,000 per day fine in addition to the extra liability for any damage their vessels cause due to the storm winds.

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