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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:04 pm 
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Here is a link I received from Stratfor with regards to the DPRK (North Korea). Hopefully more current info is forthcoming.

Preparing for What Comes Next in North Korea

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:26 pm 
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THe latest (1510 hrs CST) from NPR: North Korea Fires Apparent ICBM In First Missile Test In 2 1/2 Months
Quote:
North Korea Fires Apparent ICBM In First Missile Test In 2 1/2 Months November 28, 2017 2:41 PM ET By Camila Domonoske

Updated at 4:10 p.m. ET

The Pentagon says initial assessments show a missile launched by North Korea was an intercontinental ballistic missile, which would make it the third ICBM tested by North Korea.

An initial analysis by David Wright, a missile expert at the Union of Concerned Scientists, shows that the missile has the farthest range of any projectile yet tested by North Korea — and specifically that it would be capable of reaching the entire continental United States.

The test early on Wednesday was North Korea's first missile launch since mid-September, when Pyongyang sent a missile over Japan.

The latest missile splashed down in the Sea of Japan within Japan's exclusive economic zone, the Pentagon says. That means that unlike the previous missile, this one did not pass over Japan. The Pentagon also says the missile posed no threat to U.S. territories.

The South Korean Joint Chiefs Of Staff confirmed that a missile was launched around 3:17 a.m. local time and said the flight is being analyzed, Yonhap reports.

In response to the launch, South Korea's military staged a "precision strike" missile exercise of its own, beginning less than 10 minutes after the North Korean launch began, according to Yonhap.

North Korea has been working on long-range missiles for years.

Like the reclusive country's previous two ICBM tests, which were conducted in July, this test involved a missile traveling in a "lofted" arc that is more vertical than horizontal. The missile flew nearly 1,000 km (about 600 miles) horizontally, with an altitude of 4,500 km (nearly 2,800 miles), Yonhap says.

Researchers can use the missile's trajectory to calculate its potential range.

Melissa Hanham — senior research associate with the East Asia Nonproliferation Program of the Middlebury Institute — explained to NPR how the analysis works. "Imagine a Super Soaker or a hose that you're shooting up in the air at a very high angle and then coming down not too far away from you," she said. "If you were to change the trajectory and instead point it away from you, that water would travel a much farther distance."

A high, steep trajectory thus reveals a missile that could travel on a shallow, long trajectory — potentially striking the U.S., a capability that North Korea has long sought to have.

In this case, the newest missile shows a range of more than 13,000 km (more than 8,000 miles) according to Wright's analysis — significantly more than the previous ICBMs demonstrated.

However, he notes, "We do not know how heavy a payload this missile carried, but given the increase in range it seems likely that it carried a very light mock warhead. If true, that means it would not be capable of carrying a nuclear warhead to this long distance, since such a warhead would be much heavier."

"As we sort of sat back and held back from negotiations with North Korea, they were able to ramp up their technological experiments," Hanham says. "And they've not only improved the quality of their existing missiles, but they've diversified their forces and now added a range of new missiles, including solid-fuel missiles, very far long-range missiles including [ICBMs]. And they're working on a nuclear warhead as well."

President Trump was briefed on the situation while the missile was "still in the air," according to White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders.

At a press conference on Tuesday afternoon, Trump said his approach to North Korea has not changed in light of this new test.

"We will take care of it," he said. "It is a situation that we will handle."

The missile was launched during the middle of the night local time, which is unusual — North Korean missile tests normally are held shortly after dawn, as the Washington Post's Anna Fifeld reported this past summer.

The New York Times' Motoko Rich, based in Tokyo, reported on Twitter that Japan's cell phone alert system did not activate to warn citizens about this missile.

North Korea periodically tests missiles as part of its ongoing weapons development programs. There's no indication that this missile launch — North Korea's 20th this year, according to analysts — was a response to any particular political or military event.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 5:15 pm 
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A two-fer.

From CNBC: North Korean missile lands in Sea of Japan, Pentagon says
Quote:
North Korean missile lands in Sea of Japan, Pentagon says By Tucker Higgins | @tuckerhiggins Published 3 Hours Ago Updated 16 Mins Ago

North Korea on Tuesday fired an ICBM that traveled about 1000 km before crashing into the Sea of Japan, the Pentagon said in a statement.

The South Korean military conducted a "precision missile-firing drill" as a response to the launch, a South Korean military official told NBC.

"It is a situation that we will handle," President Donald Trump told reporters Tuesday.

North Korea on Tuesday fired a missile that traveled about 1000 km before crashing into the Sea of Japan, the Pentagon said in a statement.

The Department of Defense said that initial assessments indicated the missile was an intercontinental ballistic missile, or ICBM. In a news conference, Japan's defense minister also said it seemed to be an ICBM.

The missile went higher than any shot North Korea had previously taken, according to Defense Secretary James Mattis.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ordered an emergency meeting of Cabinet ministers following the launch, North Korea's first since Sept. 15, when one flew over northern Japan and into the Pacific Ocean.

"A missile was launched from North Korea which appears to have landed within Japan's exclusive economic zone," Abe's office tweeted. "As soon as new information comes in, we will let you know."

The exclusive economic zone is a legal designation established by the United Nations Law of the Sea.

The South Korean military conducted a "precision missile-firing drill" as a response to the launch, a South Korean military official told NBC.

The North Korean flag is seen at mast past the barbed wire fencing of the North Korean embassy in Kuala Lumpur North Korea launches ballistic missile toward Sea of Japan
1 Hour Ago | 01:04
President Donald Trump was briefed on the situation while the missile was in the air, the White House said in a statement.

"It is a situation that we will handle," he said to reporters Tuesday.

Sarah Sanders tweet
Quote:
"We are working with our interagency partners on a more detailed assessment of the launch," a Pentagon spokesman said. "The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) determined the missile launch from North Korea did not pose a threat to North America, our territories or our allies."


"Our commitment to the defense of our allies, including the Republic of Korea and Japan, in the face of these threats, remains ironclad," he added. "We remain prepared to defend ourselves and our allies from any attack or provocation."

UN Security Council President Sebastiano Cardi said he has been in contact with key UN members, but no request has been made yet for a meeting. He said he is scheduled to brief the Security Council on Wednesday.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg strongly condemned the missile test.

"North Korea needs to re-engage in a credible and meaningful dialogue with the international community," he said.

The missile was fired from Sain Ni, North Korea, the Pentagon said.

South Korea and the United States are analyzing the details of the launch, South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff told the South Korean news agency Yonhap.

Earlier on Tuesday Reuters reported that U.S. government experts believed the regime was likely to launch a missile "within days."

The launch comes on the heels of Trump's Nov. 20 announcement that the U.S. is designating North Korea as a state sponsor of terrorism.

Trump said on Tuesday that the launch does not change the U.S. approach to North Korea.

Reuters and the Associated Press contributed to this article.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.



From ABC (Australia): North Korea fires ballistic missile close to Japan
Quote:
North Korea fires ballistic missile close to Japan

North Korea has fired a ballistic missile that landed close to Japan, in the first test from the rogue regime since it fired a missile over its neighbour in mid-September.

Quote:
Key points:

Japan says the missile landed to the country's west.

South Korea's military conducted a missile-firing test in response.

Last week Trump relisted the North as a state sponsor of terrorism.


The Japanese Government called an early morning crisis meeting after the launch, which took place in the early hours of the morning, apparently from a mobile launcher near the capital Pyongyang.

Japan estimates it reached an altitude of 4,000 kilometres and flew for 50 minutes before splashing down in the sea in to the country's west.

An August 29 missile fired by North Korea that flew over Japan was airborne for 14 minutes.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ordered an emergency meeting of cabinet ministers, held around 3:30am (local time), to discuss the launch.

US President Donald Trump was briefed while the missile was still in the air, while South Korea's military conducted a missile firing exercise in response to the provocation.

In response to the launch, Mr Trump said the United States would "take care of it… it is a situation that we will handle".

The Pentagon said in its initial assessment that the missile was an intercontinental ballistic missile that travelled about 1,000 kilometres.

It added that the missile did not pose a threat to the United States its territories or allies.

Trump relisted North Korea as state sponsor of terrorism

After firing missiles at a rate of about two or three a month since April, North Korea paused its missile launches in late September, after it fired a missile that passed over Japan's northern Hokkaido island on September 15.

Last week, North Korea denounced US President Donald Trump's decision to relist it as a state sponsor of terrorism, calling it a "serious provocation and violent infringement".

The designation allows the United States to impose more sanctions, though some experts said it risked inflaming tensions.

Mr Trump has traded insults and threats with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and warned in his maiden speech to the United Nations in September that the US would have no choice but to "totally destroy" North Korea if forced to defend itself or its allies.

Washington has repeatedly said all options are on the table in dealing with North Korea, including military ones, but that it prefers a peaceful solution by Pyongyang agreeing to give up its nuclear and missile programs.

To this end, Mr Trump has pursued a policy of encouraging countries around the world, including North Korea's main ally and neighbour, China, to step up sanctions on Pyongyang to persuade it to give up its weapons programs.

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!


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