Tips for farmers cheese

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Ghostdog914
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Tips for farmers cheese

Post by Ghostdog914 » Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:34 pm

I made my first batch Monday. I wasn't expecting tons of flavor so I added a jalapeño while it was draining in the colander. When it was done unless you chewed on jalapeño it was the most tasteless thing I've ever had. I added it to scrambled eggs and it even sucked the taste out of them. I used lemon juice to start the curds. Any tips?

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Halfapint
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Re: Tips for farmers cheese

Post by Halfapint » Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:15 pm

Not sure how much salt you added. but you may want to add more salt when most of the whey has drained off. Other than that, I never remember it having a heck of a lot of flavor.
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Re: Tips for farmers cheese

Post by Ghostdog914 » Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:16 pm

I didn't add much. I'm going to try adding the peppers while it's in the pan

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Re: Tips for farmers cheese

Post by RogerK » Sat Apr 21, 2018 3:58 pm

It's not supposed to be a 'flavor'.

It's cheese and basically a condiment
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Re: Tips for farmers cheese

Post by ZombieGranny » Sun Apr 22, 2018 11:51 am

It's sort of like cream cheese or cottage cheese (depending on how much you drain or press it).
No flavor, so it picks up the flavors you use with it.
Use it in anything you would use cream cheese, paneer or cottage cheese in - cheesecake, filling for blintzes, ravioli, and the like.

Not sure why the jalapeno didn't flavor it. We use 1 teaspoon salt per half gallon of milk.
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Re: Tips for farmers cheese

Post by manacheck » Tue Jul 31, 2018 2:03 pm

I have come across this every time I make farmer's cheese from nonfat powdered milk, but it's because I'm accustomed to hard cheeses as being what the flavor of cheese is expected to be. Cheese gets its flavor from fat, salt, and aging, according to my mouth. (And my mouth is an expert.)

The real question is what are you expecting from the cheese you want to make. If it's for a filling (like in raviolis) then a low-flavor cheese is fine; adding in other things to the stuffing will make it flavorful. If you're expecting to be able to use it like cheddar (which is high fat, aged, with a balanced salt content and a melting point that releases its fats comfortably at a steaming heat) in an omelette, the results won't of course be the same, because the ratios in the cheeses are different.

Experiments to determine how to get a nice result from a fresh, lowfat cheese that can mimic aged cheese would be pretty cool, honestly. Either by adding ingredients, creating a "sauce" for it to marinate in (like cottage cheese offers), or by trying out different methods of processing further. (Pressure canning neufachatel cheese changes it from cream cheese-like, low-flavor fresh cheese into a nice, honey-colored cheese spread good for crackers, for instance; or maybe there is a way to preserve the fresh cheese that would impart flavor from storage that could give a nice result.)

Otherwise, maybe the type of cheese you want to make is a different kind; not farmer's cheese.

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