bicycle field repair kit

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taipan821
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bicycle field repair kit

Post by taipan821 » Wed Feb 21, 2018 7:34 pm

I've recently started to go bike riding again to improve cardio (rule 1) and I recently got a flat, easily fixed by replacing the tube, then repair the old tube once back home. but it got me thinking of what tools one would need to carry if using a bike to bug out, and where the tools could be stored.

I currently carry the following items on my fitness bike in a small saddle bag
- spare tube
- 2x tyre levers
- mini hand pump
- spare headlight (crappy blinker)
- basic multitool (allen keys and screwdrivers)

I am interested to see what people carry to do repairs when out and about on their bikes. I'm also interested in hearing what sort of bikes people use (mountain, road, cyclocross, hybrid etc)
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RonnyRonin
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by RonnyRonin » Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:57 pm

mostly just done on mountain bikes, but going tubeless is pretty amazing for stopping flats in the first place. On one ride I've pulled out 10 goat heads that fully punctured the tire, and then rode a few more miles home.

my kit consists of a spare tube (mostly for if I burp the tire and can't reset the bead), a larger bike-specific multitool, and a small pump. For BOV use I'd like to add some spare chain and maybe even a spare tire, but that is about it.
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by majorhavoc » Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:13 pm

A third tire lever makes a world of difference changing a flat. It's not just easier, it'll remove all temptation to use a flat head screw driver to get that extra bit of leverage. Nothing good ever comes from using a screw driver as a substitute for a tire lever. DNAMHIKT. :vmad:

If you have Presta valves, even if you have a compatible pump, it's a good idea to carry a Presta valve adapter. The adapter opens up options for you if your own pump proves defective. It not only allows you to use an automotive pump, it might allow you to use the bike pump of a fellow rider who has Schader valves. The Presta adapter is cheap, light and very compact insurance.

In addition to your allen keys and and screw drivers, double check that there aren't any regular (hex sided) bolts on your bike. If so, a couple of open end wrenches sized for those fasteners are helpful. Usually an 8mm and 10mm are all you need.

A spoke wrench is great for field expedient wheel truing, especially if you break a spoke. It can be the difference between needing to call a ride and being able to get home under your own power. Don't forget that loosening the brakes will temporarily buy you extra clearance for an out of true wheel.

I usually cram a $20 bill, a snack bar, a couple of moist towelettes and a few band aids into my saddle pouch. Along with tools, patch kit and a spare tube. I've had occasion in the past to be very thankful for each of those last four items.

taipan821
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by taipan821 » Wed Feb 28, 2018 8:25 pm

I am adding a few additional items to my repair kit.

- zipties
- basic first aid supplies (combine pad, bandage, band aids) crammed into my handlebars
- cash (about $50 in small denominations) stashed away for a taxi home (if something major breaks)

I also wear fingerless gloves to protect my palms if I fall off, done that once, don't want to do it again
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Mrselfdestruct
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by Mrselfdestruct » Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:17 pm

I love my 'cool tool', they dont make them anymore :evil:
I have a slime type product in the tires already, still carry a tube, pump, and levers.
Crescent wrench on the cooltool could work as levers in a pinch, but i like my rims gouge free.
Keep a presta adapter on a valvestem.
All rides well in the camelback.
Plenty of room for 'other' tool too.
Goddamn if i can figure out how to post pic of said cooltool.

Im sure Tac Air will take care of it.
Last edited by Mrselfdestruct on Mon Mar 05, 2018 3:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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TacAir
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by TacAir » Fri Mar 02, 2018 11:26 am

I carry one of these

Image

set of plastic tire levers, a new tube, a Zefal pump - I run 100PSI tires, so the Zefal is a musty have.

A chain tool and several spare link sets and pins

Image

Spare battery for the lights. A small 3 piece socket set - in other words, a tool for every fastener, screw, bolt etc on the machine. I use a tool trunk that fits the top of my rack, so I have room for other stuff like a small tube of grease and so on.

I commuted via bicycle for years, all of these tools will easily fit into a smaller pouch on the seat of in a roll on the top of your rack. Doing your own maintenance is a quick way to be ready for any breakdowns on the road.

Good luck.
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by Mrselfdestruct » Mon Mar 05, 2018 3:37 pm

Since you posted the cool tool. And carry another chain tool, is Cooltool chain breaker pain in the dick?
Ive only had to use it 2x in 20 years, worked, but...
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Coal-Cracker
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by Coal-Cracker » Wed Mar 07, 2018 5:26 pm

Mrselfdestruct wrote:I love my 'cool tool', they dont make them anymore :evil:
I have a slime type product in the tires already, still carry a tube, pump, and levers.
Crescent wrench on the cooltool could work as levers in a pinch, but i like my rims gouge free.
Keep a presta adapter on a valvestem.
All rides well in the camelback.
Plenty of room for 'other' tool too.
Goddamn if i can figure out how to post pic of said cooltool.

Im sure Tac Air will take care of it.
I tried the Slime tubes years ago and they didn't seem to make a difference.

I've since gone tubeless (I use Stan's) and can't recommend it enough. I went from a flat every other ride, to *maybe* one flat a season. I still carry a tube in the event of a sidewall tear, but proper tire selection will also go a long way to eliminating sidewall tears. Seating the tire bead requires either an air compressor or a pump with a reservoir. While I've used a full size compressor, they are loud. I've been using one of these lately:
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/equi ... p/p/11881/

In my camelbak, I carry:
1. spare tube
2. chainbreaker/combo tool
3. a couple zipties
4. chain quicklink
5. spare derailer hanger (bike specific)
6. $20
7. Presta/Schrader adapter
8. small first aid kit.
9. small hand pump
10. energy bar
11. small bag of baby wipes
12. cell phone

Above is what I carry on a typical 1-3 hour ride on familiar/local trails. At first glance, it *may* seem like a lot, but it really isn't. I could fit it in a small seatbag, but since I prefer carrying water with a Camelbak over a bottle, it only makes sense to throw the stuff in the Camelbak. It's much less than what I used to carry when I first started riding. :)
On unfamiliar trails I will adjust water load and be generally more prepared for the unexpected.

I ALWAYS wear a helmet and full fingered gloves. Sometimes kneepads, depending on how aggressive the terrain.

Here's the current ride in its state of winter maintenance. I do all my own maintenance. Just finished servicing the rear shock, bled brakes, and greased headtube, bottom bracket, and new shifter cable. Wheelhubs and dropper this weekend. (Ignore the basement/workshop mess. :) )Image

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gary83
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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by gary83 » Fri Apr 06, 2018 12:58 am

A multitool with a chain breaker and spoke key is very useful.

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Re: bicycle field repair kit

Post by velojym » Thu Jul 19, 2018 2:04 pm

On a short tour in the Ozarks, I broke a spoke coming down a long hill. That got interesting fast. :awesome:

A friend and I, after we toured Mtn. View and had dinner with the rest of the group, sat on the porch at our B&B, and he introduced me to one of the great wonders of my toolbag: the kevlar spoke. It's basically just a kevlar line in a nylon sheath, with a piece of threaded spoke on one end. Since my break was on the drive side, rear, and we didn't have an appropriate cogset remover, this allowed us to tie one end to the hub, route it like the old spoke, and screw the threaded end into the nipple on the rim. Pull the hub side tight, and tighten the rim end with your spoke wrench.
Made it back to Little Rock on that, and rode on it for about a week after, waiting for my mechanic to be ready to completely re-lace the wheel with better quality, butted spokes.
I had to ride in the meantime, as my bike was my primary mode of transport. The spoke held up great, though, and wasn't even out of true when Eric took the wheel apart for re-lacing.

Here's a commercial version of the home-made one I have:
https://www.amazon.com/FiberFix-Emergen ... B001GSMQZC
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