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 Post subject: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 3:21 pm 
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I ran across a short series of videos that I found to be pretty entertaining. While it was obviously staged, it got me thinking about the "apocalypse lite" scenarios, a whole scale between normal everyday life and "ZOMG! We're all gonna DIE!!!!".
EMP is something that's visited a lot in fiction, and certainly something to consider, but what about a more likely descent away from modern comforts? Say, an economic downturn that can't be countered or ignored by folks like we've been doing over the last few years... car companies can't sell new any more, modern mechanics and their high-end tools get too expensive for most people, and we start having to raid the junkyards to keep older cars running far longer than we otherwise would have bothered.
Many writers and prepper bloggers are already fond of the idea of field-repairable vehicles, so this isn't a new idea at all.

I used to read stories by a guy named Granville King in one of the off-road truck magazines, and he'd spell out some field repairs he had to do to various vehicles in the Mexican desert, such as whittling out a wooden plug to fill a cylinder, so he could chug home on 5. Using onboard batteries for welding in a pinch, stuff like that.
If you've ever had to do something not "by the book" to get home, dump it here. I'd love to see it.

Anyway, I'm gonna digress some more if I don't shut up already. Here's a link to one of the videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wspwBcuOZFg
There's a bit of surrounding story as well, which I found fairly entertaining, but it's all based around rough and ready field work on cars.

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 1:52 am 
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Punched a hole in my oil pan back in 2001 while driving. The check engine light came on just before the car turned itself off going down the highway. Got out to see the last bit of life draining out of the pan. Was within distance of a gas station so I picked up some duct tape, crazy glue, toweling, and some new oil.

Cleaned the pan the best I could, coated the area I planned on taping with crazy glue to help hold the duct tape, then layered the piss out of it with the rest of the crazy glue and tape.

Poured the first quart to see if it would hold, then added the rest and high tailed it home (about 40 mins away) where i gave it a proper fix with jb weld. No idea how long it could stay plugged with how hot operating temps get but did fine in a pinch.


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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 10:14 am 
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"Necessity is the mother of invention" took on a whole new meaning to me when I was an intern on a rural development project in Northern Kenya. Some of the crazy hack repair jobs I saw were absolutely incredible. I saw people doing things with vehicles and other machines that trained mechanics in this country wouldn't even attempt because they'd immediately convince themselves it's impossible.

"The right tool for the right job"; "the only job worth doing is a job done right" - all that goes out the window when you're stuck with limited resources. It is absolutely amazing when:
1) You're truly desperate
2) You have the knowledge
3) You operate from the assumption that because the repair has to be successful, it will be successful.

That being said, some welding skills and a well-stocked boneyard really gives you a leg on up on things.

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:38 pm 
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Not me personally but in the Grapes of Wrath (book) they re-build the Model T motor on the side of the road. It's been decades since I read it but I recall they used brass wire for piston rings.

My Pinto sprung a radiator leak far from home one time. Had just happened to pull in to a truck stop to look at my muffler that had just fallen off. Bought a bottle or Bar's Stop Leak or whatever it is and that stuff held not only to get me 100 miles home but for months after that.


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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 2:08 pm 
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50 Mission Cap wrote:
Not me personally but in the Grapes of Wrath (book) they re-build the Model T motor on the side of the road. It's been decades since I read it but I recall they used brass wire for piston rings.

My Pinto sprung a radiator leak far from home one time. Had just happened to pull in to a truck stop to look at my muffler that had just fallen off. Bought a bottle or Bar's Stop Leak or whatever it is and that stuff held not only to get me 100 miles home but for months after that.


The Model T was designed to be rebuilt in a barn - BTW - most rings were leather.

The days of crazy fix it are all but gone due to the computerization of autos - fuel injectors and other 'high tech' stuff.


If I were looking for a fix it myself vehivle, it would be a 1946 Jeepster or a Jeep Station wagon.

The old flat head 4 were an easy fix as was most of the mechanicals.

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1956 Willys - a lot of these are still on the road.

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 9:12 am 
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Yeah, it's harder to imagine finding a modern, computerized vehicle sitting in the weather for a decade or more, and be able to coax it to life with a battery, some fluids, and a little brain juice.
That Willys wagon has always been on my "want" list, for various reasons, but simplicity and utility are the top ones.

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 5:04 pm 
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50 Mission Cap wrote:
Not me personally but in the Grapes of Wrath (book) they re-build the Model T motor on the side of the road. It's been decades since I read it but I recall they used brass wire for piston rings.

My Pinto sprung a radiator leak far from home one time. Had just happened to pull in to a truck stop to look at my muffler that had just fallen off. Bought a bottle or Bar's Stop Leak or whatever it is and that stuff held not only to get me 100 miles home but for months after that.
Did it catch on fire?

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 9:04 pm 
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flybynight wrote:
50 Mission Cap wrote:
My Pinto sprung a radiator leak ...
Did it catch on fire?


Based on his description of the problem and his repair, no. Now if he had hip checked the rear hatch to get it closed...

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 5:57 pm 
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Check out offroad channels on youtube for good trail (bush) fixes.

The best ghetto mechanics I ever met were hardcore offroaders. If only I had the brains for the things they can do with pliers and zip ties.

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 9:25 am 
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JeeperCreeper wrote:
Check out offroad channels on youtube for good trail (bush) fixes.

The best ghetto mechanics I ever met were hardcore offroaders. If only I had the brains for the things they can do with pliers and zip ties.


I'd have to find it again, but one fella found an old pickup that was parked, years ago, when the steering went out. Turns out it was the rag joint. He used a handful of zip ties to hold the joint together enough to drive it out of the bushes (after going through all that was needed to get the old truck going again) and onto a trailer.

I love those old vehicle rescue videos, and it also just happens to show the skills and attitude you'd need for keeping stuff running when industrial support has died off.

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 7:03 pm 
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having used the trick of using the car heater to prevent the engine overheating (acts as a second radiator) as well as bush repairs to get off-road vehicles back to the road for a tow truck I can attest that the older the vehicle...the easier it is to get it back to the road

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 9:55 am 
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Quote:
Did it catch on fire?



Ha Ha. This was the mid 80's. The "Top Secret" movie was one of our favorites. If you recall in that movie a Pinto gets tapped from behind at about 1/2 mile and hour and blows up.

No it was my 1972 Gran Torino (after the Pinto) that burned up due to an underhood fuel leak - that I knew about and ignored.

Forgot one - I have a 1981 VW Pickup diesel. It was about 5 degrees F some years ago and like a dumbass I thought I would go for a drive. Well the motor starved for fuel likely because there was water in the fuel and a restriction somewhere in the system. Anyway chugged to a halt in an AutoZone parking lot. Went inside, bought a gallon of automatic transmission fluid, pulled the soft lines off the hard fuel lines to/from the tank, put the soft lines into the jug and fed the injection pump straight from the ATF bottle and drove home.

That vehicle is a true EMP proof vehicle. Once started (by pushing if necessary) it will run and drive without a battery or alternator - and also no lights or radio.


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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 2:57 pm 
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... raine.html

Old WWII tank started and drives off....Ukraine. Sitting on a platform as a WWII memorial, two 'pranksters' jump start the old tank. Diesel engines rule!

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:09 pm 
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Nails as opposed to retainer pins.

Clamped off a broken brake line with vice grips to drive home with front brakes only.

Two liter bottle and a hose gravity fed a carb when the fuel pump went out.

Wire run to a wrench used in the cab when the throttle linkage went out.

Straight wired/pop started a solenoid.

Straight wired nearly any and all electrical systems when relays/fuses/switches/sensors failed.

Washers as spacers.

Boring out any and all holes to fit a wrong bolt size/pattern. Including wheels and starters.

Looping heater hoses to bypass broken systems.

Looping power steering hoses to bypass broken systems.

Using twigs to block vacuum ports.

Using twigs to hold a choke open when the solenoid fails.

Panty hose to wrap blown hoses.

Cut belts to width to fit on improper pulleys.

Cut belts to relieve pressure after damage to that the engine could run, without any accessories.

Grind any piece of scrap metal (road signs are preffered) for block off plates, sheet metal repair, floor pan repair, skid plates, etc...





I am just an old redneck from back in the hills. This was an every day thing. We couldn't afford to go to the parts house to order the proper part.

Thankfully now I can afford to do it right, and have the knowledge that I don't have to if I don't want to.

Engineering is a marvelous thing.

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 10:54 pm 
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Murgatroy wrote:
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Sorry; I had to get that out of my system. I'll just exit stage left ...

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 Post subject: Re: Bush Mechanics
PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 3:27 pm 
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Seen exhaust fixed with a home made welder.
I've personally used pantyhose to replace a belt on a beetle and quite a few other tricks.
Hammer, pliers, steel wire, duct tape and WD-40 will take care if a lot of problems...

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