SHTF Convoy Driving

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SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by BullOnParade » Sat Jan 11, 2014 9:20 pm

A few weeks ago my girlfriend needed to drop her car off at the shop, so I convoyed with her to the shop, we spent the day together, and then convoyed back to her house. I did not know where her shop was, so I followed her once we departed. While following her, I started thinking of convoying in a SHTF scenario, where cellphones may not be an option, and breaking up from the group may leave people in danger.

A few points I thought of:
Communication - Everyone has cellphones, but these services are often knocked out or overloaded in disaster scenarios. Hand held radios/walkie talkies are probably going to get thrown in my car next time I see them on sale. They don't need to be expensive, a line of sight set should work car to car over 50 yards. Even a set of children's toy walkie talkies would probably work, but I'll probably opt for FRS/GMRS. Might consider holding out for a Midland XT511 or similar.

I remember one time Horatio Tyllis and I were carpooling east to a ZS meeting. Traffic was moving smoothly when a car somewhere ahead of us and one lane over blipped his hazard lights twice and then turned them off. Horatio eased off the accelerator and asked something along the lines of "what's going on here". I pointed out the van behind the car had followed him into the right most lane and they were probably riding together, that was their signal to exit into the rest stop ahead. Obviously your vehicle has signal devices built into it which can serve usefulness outside of their intended purpose.

Directions: in an ideal situation, at least all drivers should know where they're going and how to get there, if not all passengers too. This isn't always the case, as the day I talked about above. Any thoughts on good practice when not all convoy drivers know the final destination, or don't know the area well enough to circumnavigate obstacles?

Defensive vs Offensive driver types: I regularly go for dinner with a friend from my gun club after an evening of shooting. Despite living in the city her whole life, and having been driving since before I was born, my friend is an overly defensive driver and unsure of her (and her vehicles) abilities. Her speed is sporadic, I've been a passenger in her car, she had a tendency to speed while talking, yet when she follows me to a restaurant, I have to watch for her to not fall behind. A passive aggressive driver like her would be cause of concern for me while driving in a disaster scenario. Even something as simple as navigating a yellow traffic light becomes a dangerous. Discussing convoy procedures for such things before needing to drive in a group could save a lot of anxiety during a disaster scenario.

Anyone have some good convoy tips or points for consideration?
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Evan the Diplomat » Sat Jan 11, 2014 9:34 pm

Review the route in advance. Discuss places such as interchanges and off ramps in advance. Agree on what to do at traffic lights (I know some of you are imagining driving through shambling hordes but in most general cases of convoy driving there will be traffic lights. what do you do if the convoy is split up?

One of my classmates in my Foreign Service cohort bugged out of the Rwandan genocide in an overland convoy. The had plants of bribe money as well as cold drinks and cigarettes to hand out at check points. There were also smuggling out some Rwandan kids that belonged to local employees. IIRC they tore the pages out of blank temporary U.S. passports and wrapped the covers around the Rwandan passports and stuck them in the middle of the deck. The check point goons never bothered to inspect the entire stack of 40 plus passports.

FWIW I've driven in several high speed diplomatic convoys, the longest about seven hours in Venezuela. I'm not prone to motion sickness but these guys get the cars about a meter apart and rarely slower than 80 miles an hour as they hink and jink through traffic. It was one of those days that I regretted having diplomatic immunity. At least the gas was cheap because we were using a ton of it.
Last edited by Evan the Diplomat on Sat Jan 11, 2014 10:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by EndeavourOfWill » Sat Jan 11, 2014 9:47 pm

If you have a few people and you're interested in doing some training you can have drivers try navigating solely on the direction of the co-driver. The driver can't ask questions, ask for clairification, speak at all- he just does exactly what he's told. Have them navigate through a city to a specific spot. As they drive by have them memorize as much as they can about a certain area without stopping, when they get back ask them questions. Kind of like a Kims game. FRS radios are great, come up with drills for when one vehicle gets bogged down in traffic and when you loose comms with each other. I'm not sure who your cell company is but I'm with rogers and on New years eve my service shut down for hours because they were overloaded. Got me thinking about how fast cells would become useless in a SHTF situation.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Tater Raider » Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:17 am

My thoughts:

Most experienced group driver brings up the rear, next most in the lead vehicle. CB radios with SSB would be killer but any ol Mobile CB rig with a tuned antenna will work and those two vehicles need 'em (or something better). All other vehicles can use handheld CB's to monitor (or do without if it comes to that).

Any group bigger than 3 vehicles I would slow down a bit, like lead vehicle does 5mph below the limit. My reasoning is that I remember playing Crack the Whip and a convoy naturally does the same thing.

Make sure all vehicles have maps and directions and that there is a deadline for stragglers. Once deadline is hit the group can press on, wait, or go looking for them as needed.

Breakdown longer trips into 3 hour sections to make it easier for the group to stay together.

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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by BullOnParade » Sun Jan 12, 2014 10:44 am

Tater Raider wrote:My thoughts:

Most experienced group driver brings up the rear, next most in the lead vehicle. CB radios with SSB would be killer but any ol Mobile CB rig with a tuned antenna will work and those two vehicles need 'em (or something better). All other vehicles can use handheld CB's to monitor (or do without if it comes to that).

Any group bigger than 3 vehicles I would slow down a bit, like lead vehicle does 5mph below the limit. My reasoning is that I remember playing Crack the Whip and a convoy naturally does the same thing.

Make sure all vehicles have maps and directions and that there is a deadline for stragglers. Once deadline is hit the group can press on, wait, or go looking for them as needed.

Breakdown longer trips into 3 hour sections to make it easier for the group to stay together.
[Emphasis added]
Great points, but can you elaborate on the Crack the Whip reference? I understand the concept of the game, and I think you're saying that cars in a convoy tend to push each other to go faster. Correct? I could see value in a lead car having cruse control, especially in a SHTF scenario where drivers will be under stress and/or distracted.

I would also see the benefit in each vehicle having a competent copilot - someone to take care of things like GPS/map navs, coms and comfort things like being able to get the driver a drink from the back seat or manage the cars climate. The second part to this would be a driver who is able to accept the help. A lot of drivers are used to being overly independent. Change the radio, adjust the heat, answer texts, plug in their phone, take off their jacket, unwrap a double big mac and scoff it down, all at 80 mph. When they have someone in the car who is able to help them achieve these things in a much safer way (let the copilot do it while the driver focusses on the road), they default to doing it themselves.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Tater Raider » Sun Jan 12, 2014 6:06 pm

BullOnParade wrote:
Tater Raider wrote:My thoughts:

Any group bigger than 3 vehicles I would slow down a bit, like lead vehicle does 5mph below the limit. My reasoning is that I remember playing Crack the Whip and a convoy naturally does the same thing.
[Emphasis added]
Great points, but can you elaborate on the Crack the Whip reference? I understand the concept of the game, and I think you're saying that cars in a convoy tend to push each other to go faster. Correct? I could see value in a lead car having cruse control, especially in a SHTF scenario where drivers will be under stress and/or distracted.
Crack-the-Whip effect:

Lead vehicle speeds up. The next vehicle won't react to that until a little bit of time has passed so they end up accelerating a bit more and driving a bit faster to catch up. Next vehicle reacts to the second the same way and so one until the last vehicle in line is going well over the limit to catch up.

Now put a deer in the road and have the lead vehicle hit the breaks. If the second vehicle has just enough room to miss the lead when they panic brake then the third will push the second into the first.

Lane changes are even worse than either of the above when dealing with a large group. Best way to work it is to be going slower than traffic and the last vehicle in line moves over, then the vehicle in front of them and so on until the lead vehicle is the last vehicle to make the lane change. Trailing vehicle acts to clear out the lane this way.

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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Murgatroy » Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:03 pm

I host a yearly national level driving event. We have had from 10 cars to over 100 cars attend the event over the last decade. The route has run through urban, suburban and rural mountainous regions.

The main rules are simple.

Everyone knows the route.

You are responsible for the car behind you. You keep them in sight. This starts from the first car to the last. And it is pretty simple. Adhering to this one rule makes everything else really easy.

Use indicators to turn, if you lose the car behind you you sit at the turn until they come.

If you lose the car behind you at a traffic signal, you pull over ASAP in a visible spot and wait on them.

If you need the stop you flash your lights (high beams) at the car in front of you and you follow him over, he is responsible for you. If the car in front of you pulls over, you pull over. This can lead to many cars pulled over at once, but it also leads to more hands if you need them. If you are the last car, you flash the car in front of you, he flashes the car in front of him, etc... This is how you communicate without radios/etc... When it reaches the front car, the whole convoy pulls over as one.

Have multiple 'leaders.' I like one per ten cars. This keeps the cars in smaller groups. The leader must know where the group is going. The leader must know detours.

As mentioned above it is also nice to have someone familiar, the most, or close to it of the area in the rear running sweep. To be honest this is normally where I am during the event.

We use two way radios. These are only good for ~10 car lengths, or maybe 150yds. Pick a channel, stay on that channel.



With these rules, as long as everyone follows them you will have fewer issues, the most important though is to always watch the car behind you. As long as you know where your tail is, the head is clear to the tail.

Using this method we have dealt with things as mundane as a turbo coupling popping, or a flat tire, to as severe as a car driving off a mountain (on more than one occasion) or an engine relieving itself of all it's shiny bits in a magnificent fashion.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by angelofwar » Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:12 pm

+1000 on the radios. Don't just have them...USE them...and the lead vehicle should be able to ID threats/problems. "I'm at 1/8th tank, I'm getting off on exit 185 to top off".

Maps...HARD COPIES!

At least one operational CB (lead vehicle?)to communicate with the truckers

One person should have a scanner to monitor L.E., First Responders, etc.

KNOWLEDGE is power!!!

Also, a pair of bino's in the lead and trailing vehicles.

Dedicated GPS unit (handheld preffered, so you can take it with you if you need to leave the convoy)

Just a few things I try to do and have found effective.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Boondock » Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:21 pm

I always thought these cards were pretty "smart," pun totally intended. :D

http://www.paolobarnard.info/docs/ROE%20Card.pdf

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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Murgatroy » Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:36 pm

Boondock wrote:I always thought these cards were pretty "smart," pun totally intended. :D

http://www.paolobarnard.info/docs/ROE%20Card.pdf
That is pretty awesome.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by emclean » Mon Jan 13, 2014 9:28 am

two thoughts about radios.
1) FRS and CB are all over the place, and there will be many other people with the same idea. ever tried to use a FRS at a big event? there are many people walking all over your transmissions. CB SSB will be less of a problem, cause they are on more expensive radios.
have them to keep an ear of what is happening.
2) get an amateur radio license, 1.25M and 6m are the least likely bands to be in use. you will be able to find free frequencies on 2m and 70cm, but they are more popular bands.

my only wisdom to add comes from the world of SCUBA, where we plan our dives, then dive our plan.
so plan your drive, and then drive your plan. brief everyone of driving age the route, planed rally points, what to do is separated, how to single emergencies, and minimum fuel levels. the more you lay out ahead of time, the more you beat back Murphy.

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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Mon Jan 13, 2014 10:53 am

Agree with everything so far. Having a nonverbal signal plan is a must though. Way too easy to get comms stepped on or lose them for one reason or another.

Strip maps are useful, but they take a second to get used to. Handy though.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by ineffableone » Mon Jan 13, 2014 1:03 pm

emclean wrote:two thoughts about radios.
1) FRS and CB are all over the place, and there will be many other people with the same idea. ever tried to use a FRS at a big event? there are many people walking all over your transmissions. CB SSB will be less of a problem, cause they are on more expensive radios.
have them to keep an ear of what is happening.
2) get an amateur radio license, 1.25M and 6m are the least likely bands to be in use. you will be able to find free frequencies on 2m and 70cm, but they are more popular bands.
Another radio option with a lot less use but still quality is MURS radios. They are good effective short distance coms and have a fraction of the popular use that CB or FRS or GMRS. This means your relatively assured free com lines with MURS unlike the popularly used CB or FRS or GMRS.

*edit to add, while having a radio that others aren't going to pick up your transmissions can be good, don't forget that it can also be good to be able to monitor other's transmissions. So while you may want to operate your team on MURS, having CB and FRS/GMRS radios could be helpful for listening in to what others are doing out there. You could pick up info about road blocks, washed out bridges, stalled cars, even possible bandits. So while keeping a secure channel for yourself has bonuses, being able to monitor others can be just as big a need.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Tater Raider » Mon Jan 13, 2014 2:05 pm

Murgatroy wrote:Have multiple 'leaders.' I like one per ten cars. This keeps the cars in smaller groups. The leader must know where the group is going. The leader must know detours.

As mentioned above it is also nice to have someone familiar, the most, or close to it of the area in the rear running sweep. To be honest this is normally where I am during the event.
Worth noting, the people leading/trailing the convoy might change during a trip because different folk are familiar with different areas.

emclean wrote:get an amateur radio license, 1.25M and 6m are the least likely bands to be in use. you will be able to find free frequencies on 2m and 70cm, but they are more popular bands.
Pocket reference for repeater networks might not be a bad idea for gathering local intel from licensed operators.

ineffableone wrote:*edit to add, while having a radio that others aren't going to pick up your transmissions can be good, don't forget that it can also be good to be able to monitor other's transmissions. So while you may want to operate your team on MURS, having CB and FRS/GMRS radios could be helpful for listening in to what others are doing out there. You could pick up info about road blocks, washed out bridges, stalled cars, even possible bandits. So while keeping a secure channel for yourself has bonuses, being able to monitor others can be just as big a need.
If someone had a dedicated COMS vehicle it would really make moving a larger (I'm guessing anything over 5 but that's me, not any number based on science or experience) convoy easier. Lead and Trail vehicle would control movement/be active on the "in-house" Convy COMS while the radio wagon passes along info they gather to the leader via a dedicated frequency. Everyone else would monitor the convoy's "in-house" freq and stay off the air unless they absolutely have to break in.


I like CB's for a convoy's "in-house" COMS because they are inexpensive, require no license, are readily available, selling a non-prepper on the idea of a CB with Weather Radio is easier than convincing them of the need for a 1.25m radio, and it can be a gateway to the larger hobby of amateur radio. If you can afford/have room for a SSB CB it gives you a lot more options/reduces the likelyhood of Joe Blow eavesdropping on the group but that's something that a group would have to impliment beforehand.

Handy Talkies/MURS/FRS/GMRS radios get you away from the Citizen's Band and people listening in but some have licensing requirements and handhelds perform noticibly worse inside a vehicle than outside.

There are workarounds and tradeoffs to everything. Each group will have to decide what they are doing beforehand so the gear is available if needed and that can get fun when mixing non-preppers and preppers into a group.

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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Evan the Diplomat » Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:58 pm

Boondock wrote:I always thought these cards were pretty "smart," pun totally intended. :D

http://www.paolobarnard.info/docs/ROE%20Card.pdf
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by feedthedog » Mon Jan 13, 2014 4:25 pm

As a former army convoy commander in Iraq, I thought I'd try to toss in my 2 cents though it may not be that useful.

As most folks have pointed out, you need to have a good plan that has been communicated to everyone in advance. Communications systems make everything easier, but even with military radios you can run into problems with a large enough convoy.

Our combat SOPs probably wouldn't be all that useful, since most of it was based around having armored vehicles and crew served weapons. It wasn't really a big deal to get shot at, and it happened pretty frequently. We typically just called it in, drove through, and didn't necessarily even return fire since positive ID is tricky in the dark at 40mph. We were running cargo, so it really wasn't our job to hunt down the bad guys anyway.

One potentially overlooked aspect of convoy planning is breakdown procedures. We had a wrecker or two to pull broken vehicles, but that is doubtful in this scenario. You may want to plan to abandon vehicles and cross load the cargo. This means that you probably don't want to pack any vehicle to capacity.

If someone has any experience running convoys during the earliest part of the Iraq war, then they would probably be a great resource.

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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by ineffableone » Mon Jan 13, 2014 5:10 pm

feedthedog wrote:ou may want to plan to abandon vehicles and cross load the cargo. This means that you probably don't want to pack any vehicle to capacity.
This is a very good point. It would also be wise to make sure gear is easy to transfer if needed, as in contained in bags or totes or other methods to keep it in order. Rather than have lots of little stuff.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by EndeavourOfWill » Mon Jan 13, 2014 5:32 pm

feedthedog wrote:As a former army convoy commander in Iraq, I thought I'd try to toss in my 2 cents though it may not be that useful.
What kind of vehicles were you using for your convoys? What was your escort vehicle to transport vehicle ratio?
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by feedthedog » Mon Jan 13, 2014 6:13 pm

EndeavourOfWill wrote:
feedthedog wrote:As a former army convoy commander in Iraq, I thought I'd try to toss in my 2 cents though it may not be that useful.
What kind of vehicles were you using for your convoys? What was your escort vehicle to transport vehicle ratio?
Depended heavily on the mission.... Escort vehicles were 1151s at first, but phased more toward ASVs, and then to the multitude of MRAPs. Cargo vehicles were mostly M915s (freight liners), HETs, and sometimes the PLS or even civilian trucks.

The ratio really depended on the area and the mission. I remember a 1:1 ratio while we were placing barriers in Sadr city. Probably overkill, but it made me feel better since we were out wandering around.

Like I said though, not terribly useful since our trucks were well armored and it was pretty easy to avoid a gunfight. I remember asking, "are we being shot at, or is that gravel hitting the truck?" at least once per mission. The only thing that posed any real threat would have been some sort of IED, and if there are IEDs on US roads then you are better off at home.

The biggest lesson was that shit breaks at the exact wrong time, every time. If you can't tow the vehicle, then you should be prepared to fix it or abandon it.

Planning for some kind of combat scenario while inside of a thin skinned vehicle and without crew served weapons sounds like suicide to me. Even with armored trucks, AC-130s, and M2s we always planned to avoid potential problems. Personally, I wouldn't worry about combat SOPs. Without armor, a gun truck is more like a target truck.

I'd be more concerned about traffic, running out of gas, getting lost, or breaking a truck.

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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Bonecrusher Doc » Tue Jan 14, 2014 12:08 am

Great thread! With some great contributors!

My two cents: From my experience with small family convoys of 2-3 vehicles, our walkie-talkies always ran out of battery at the same time that we were driving in the mountains without cell phone reception, so we needed a backup plan like "If I flash my lights, don't just slow down, PULL OVER at the next exit!"

From my experience in Iraq - I was just a passenger on convoys, not part of the planning and execution, but I will say the Army definitely got it down to a science for those particular circumstances. The times I noticed them screw up was when they deviated from the plan that they had rehearsed. For example, our standard operating procedure was that if the convoy had to stop for any reason, the lead vehicle would radio back what was going on. Well, one time somebody had to make a potty stop in the lead vehicle, but the rule was no potty stops, so they just stopped and didn't tell anybody what was going on. We were extremely vulnerable at that time, the whole convoy stopped on the road with no clue why we were stopped and the lead vehicle refusing to answer our radio calls for what the heck was going on up there. Then after a long silence they just said "OK, we're rolling now," with no explanation. Jerks. As a side note, some sort of "honey bucket" or other equipment might not be a bad idea in a SHTF Driving situation. We've used this with our kids while on the autobahn in a traffic jam with no safe place to pull over for miles ahead:
http://www.amazon.com/Kalencom-2-in-1-P ... avel+potty
Blood clots were actually a fairly common reason to evacuate soldiers from Iraq, which were a result of long convoys without the chance to stretch your legs, combined with dehydration. Even if you're mentally tough enough to ignore the discomfort, sometimes the body is telling you that you need to stretch for a good reason.

Another time we had a minor VIP, the Brigade Command Sergeant Major, as a passenger in the convoy. He kept getting on the radio trying to tell the young convoy commander (who I think was a 1LT) what to do. Well, once you're already on the road, it's a heck of a time to start changing the SOPs just because you think yours are better. The convoy commander did the right thing and respectfully told the Sergeant Major to cut it out.

Just like the Army always has somebody in the passenger seat, on the civilian side it's very valuable to always have an additional adult or at least teenager in every vehicle besides the driver for communicating and to follow on a HARD COPY road atlas what roads, exits, towns, and bridges come next. Driving on the autobahns in Europe my wife would have her finger on the map at all times. If you miss your exit there it will frequently cost you 15 minutes in turnaround time. If you suddenly come upon a sign that says "traffic jam ahead, expect delays!" but your navigator already knows that the next exit will provide you with an alternate route, you can make a quick decision to take that exit and avoid getting stuck for hours.

I read the book Contact! A Tactical Manual for Post Collapse Survival by "Max Velocity", which explained some convoy tactics in it but mostly just for convoys with a minimum of three (somewhat armored) vehicles each with at least two armed adults in them. Which really didn't give me any clever ideas for bugging out with me in my truck and my wife and kids in the minivan.

Oh yeah, nobody has mentioned fuel yet! When in Germany, we went on a lot of road trips. I only purchased gas at "Esso" brand gas stations, which had an agreement with the military so I could pay the American fuel ration price. It made me get used to considering gas stations as a very scarce resource (especially in some regions of Germany) and plan accordingly. Especially because sometimes the map or the GPS would say there was an Esso ahead, but when you got there... it had been bought out by a different company, and if you were cutting it close, you would have to pay the same as the Germans (about quadruple the price). Then you found the last Esso to fill up at before you crossed the border into another country where you had no fuel ration privileges. We planned ahead, but still failed on occasion and had to pay full price for a different brand! If the consequences were worse, such as getting stranded while trying to bug out, I would want an extra large gas tank in my vehicle or some portable fuel cans on the back.

Another thing is the money to pay for gas. Credit card lines can go down, ATM machines can be out-of-order, even during non-SHTF. Cash is King.

My last tidbit is that I recommend putting a couple packs of caffeinated chewing gum in your center console. As soon as I catch myself getting heavy eyelids, it's there, so I don't have to have a debate with myself, like "Am I really so tired that I need to get a coffee at the next gas station? I really just want to get home..."
Bonecrusher Doc wrote: I'd say this has at least a little justification as a mental exercise.
JamesCannon wrote:Yes, well there's the right way and wrong way to exercise, and the wrong way can lead to injury and/or damage. :P

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aus.templar
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by aus.templar » Tue Jan 14, 2014 1:01 am

Comms is the major issue in non-military convoys.

I highly recomment Baofeng radios, they're good quality and can be had for around $40 each. I bought 5, my only problem is the earpieces they came with aren't very comfortable in my ear but they function fine on speaker. They also have a handy AM/FM function, which you can set it to play the radio then it switches back to UHF/VHF when it senses a transmission.

Also brainstorm common situations and write down your own set of SOPs
shrapnel wrote:Shut the fuck up, you'll meet me and you'll like me or I'll fucking cut you. :twisted:
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EndeavourOfWill
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by EndeavourOfWill » Tue Jan 14, 2014 8:47 am

feedthedog wrote: I remember asking, "are we being shot at, or is that gravel hitting the truck?" at least once per mission. The only thing that posed any real threat would have been some sort of IED, and if there are IEDs on US roads then you are better off at home.
Funny how that works eh? We caught two drivers listening to IPods once. We were hit in an ambush. When we dismounted at the FOB they asked us why we "stopped back there". We said to check for damage and they asked damage from what. We started to reply the ambush we just drove through when we noticed the headphone wires sticking out of their shirts. Guess the lesson for here would be presence of mind and plan for the "lowest common denominator" IE the plan has to be understood by the more simple convoy members.

Something also applicable to civilian convoy driving. In the movies civilian cars get shot, smashed, jump rivers, roll over and still run. Sometimes they DO put up with a lot of abuse but I've also found sometimes even the slightest bit of damage will disable a vehicle. Gotta make sure drivers don't think they can ram and bump vehicles and debris out of the way without consequence.

YurilyDawood wrote:Cell phone jammer is an electronic device that blocks the transmission of signals between the cell phone and its nearby base station. By using the same frequency as the cell phones, the pocket mobile jammer creates strong interference to the communication between the caller and the receiver. It is efficient in blocking the transmission of signals from the phone networks, including UMTS, 3G, CDMA, GSM and PHS.
So in an emergency you're going to go around jamming peoples cell phone signals? I don't understand the context of your post about jammers.
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MaconCJ7
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by MaconCJ7 » Tue Jan 14, 2014 8:58 am

EndeavourOfWill wrote:
feedthedog wrote:
YurilyDawood wrote:Cell phone jammer is an electronic device that blocks the transmission of signals between the cell phone and its nearby base station. By using the same frequency as the cell phones, the pocket mobile jammer creates strong interference to the communication between the caller and the receiver. It is efficient in blocking the transmission of signals from the phone networks, including UMTS, 3G, CDMA, GSM and PHS.
So in an emergency you're going to go around jamming peoples cell phone signals? I don't understand the context of your post about jammers.
I could be off base, but I think he is simply point out how easy it is to lose cell comms in shtf bug out. Not everyone plays on the up and up. He could have done so in a better manner than just saying that cell phone jammers exist, but he's new.

I don't have much to say about convoys other than to practice. You don't need any high speed training for a convoy, but practice is essential. It seems like a cut and dry process. Follow the lead car, don't be a straggler. But, it's not. Something as simple as a lane change can seriously screw up convoy order and/or spacing. A practice run once a month or so, if only for a 20-30 minute drive, can greatly aid in preparation. Start planning Saturday meals at the Cracker Barrel down the freeway a little bit. You get your practice, and have an end goal. City convoys present even more problems, such as traffic lights and congestion patterns, so that's worth practicing as well. You can't practice for every eventuality, but if you practice the basics and have plans for what may come, obstacles are easier to meet.
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Re: SHTF Convoy Driving

Post by Mikeyboy » Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:39 am

I thought about convoy driving as well. My original plan was to load up my vehicle because it a mini SUV with 4x4 and bigger than my wife's car. I would load up my truck to the brim, get my wife and kids and go, leaving the other vehicle behind. However, the more I thought about that, the more I thought it was a bad idea, especially after reading this prepping blog from a guy who lived thru Katrina. One big thing he mentioned really stuck out.

http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs ... /0021.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Your vehicle represents wealth. It has cash value, no matter how small, but it also has the value of being able to take you away from a disaster zone quickly. Transportation is a kind of wealth.
While I thought it was safer to have everybody in one vehicle, but what happens if that vehicle breaks down along the evacuation route. When I get to my BOL, am I going to need 2 vehicles like I already do in everyday life. Also if things are real bad, and we only need one vehicle, the other could be sold.

The idea of a SHTF convoy is real interesting. I think back to my childhood in the 1970's and 80's. This was pre-cell phones, and pre-GPS yet somehow we had family vacations with caravans of vehicles that would follow each other 1000 miles from PA to FL every summer. I remember we used note pads and markers to communicate between vehicle, " Need to stop for gas soon" , "Need to pee" , or " get off at exit #5" would be held up for the others to see. Today I think FRS walkie talkies would be better, but the notepad option can be a backup as well. The other thing is no one leaves anyone in the caravan behind. If you go thru a yellow light and a person following you is stuck behind a red light, the whole caravan would pull over and wait for the straggler to catch up. While a caravan may be slower and a PITA to keep together, the benefit is the support of large numbers, like help with break downs, more vehicles carrying more supplies, more drivers to offer opinions, etc.

I also think everyone driving should know where they are going, knowing the route inside and out and know how to drive well. I'm an aggressive driver and in a caravan I rather follow than lead, because if cautious drivers are following me I am more likely loose them, but I never loose anyone I'm following.

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