First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

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SoCalDep
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First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by SoCalDep » Mon May 23, 2011 11:41 pm

Hi all...I've been building and refining my various first aid/trauma kits and recently picked up a new bag, so I thought I'd put it out there for review/critique. Since this kit is meant to be used in a variety of situations, I decided to "try" to stay in compliance with our scope of training and practice. As such, you'll see references to items I'd "like" to include but didn't based on the above compliance issues. This bag will go in my personal vehicle when not at work and will be in the trunk on duty. I am not an EMT and I'm only trained to first responder level.

Here's the bag...It's a Voodoo Tactical responder/range bag. It has multiple compartments and MOLLE/PALS webbing on all four sides. It has a large center compartment divided into three sections with removable/moveable dividers and has two long side pouches, two end pouches, and two smaller zippered pockets on each end pocket. It has some sort of internal foam or other stabilizer which helps the bag keep it's shape, even when empty. I added a small "trauma" bag on one end, a couple admin-type pouches on the other, and a double AR/M16 mag pouch to carry my tourniquets. It should be noted I soon plan on getting rid of both sets of end pouches for a better hemostatic kit and booboo kit. So here it is all together (for now):

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And here it is with the main section open:

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The main section is divided into three parts, and I have designated these sections as major wound care, misc. gauze/dressings, and respiratory care. The major wounjd care section contains the following:

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1 x Israeli Abdominal Dressing
4 x Israeli Bandage (6")
6 x 4.5x4.1yd Kerlix
2 x Triangle Bandages

The Misc Gauze/Dressing section contains the following:

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2 x Oval Eye Pads
4 x 2x2" gauze
3 x 3x3" gauze
10 x 4x4" gauze (2 per pack for 20 total)
2 x 5x9" Abdominal Pads
2 x Triangle Bandages

The Respiratory Care section contains the following:

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1 x Ambu Spur II BVM
1 x OPA ****Cause I have it...I'm not certified to use it and will probably remove it, as we aren't authorized to use airway adjuncts.
2 x Ascherman Chest Seals (Will probably soon replace with Hyfins or similar)


There are two longer side compartments. I designated them the orthopedic compartment and the general treatment compartment.

The Orthopedic Compartment contains the following:

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2 x 36" SAM Splints
1 x SAM Finger Splint
1 x SAM Instructions
1 x Coban wrap
2 x 2" Ace-type bandage
2 x 6" Ace-type bandage
2 x Triangle bandage
2 x Heat Packs

The General Treatment module contains the following:

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2 x Space-type blankets
1 x Micropore (I think) medical tape
1 x Eye cup pack (Has six in it...more than I'll probably need, but it's in the container so...)
1 x Eye wash
1 x Cold Pack
1 x Cleansing wipes
1 x Irrigation Syringe
1 x small scissors
1 x Insta-Glucose
1 x Triple Antibiotic Ointment
1 x Anti-Itch Ointment


The end compartments hold my obstetrical kit and PPE:

PPE:

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3 x Heavy Duty Gloves (I have back-stock to replace and carry several pairs of gloves in my pocket at work)
3 x N95 face masks
1 x Goggles
1 x Hand sanitizer


Obstetrical Kit (Commercial):

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1 x Pr Gloves
1 x Apron
1 x Underpad
1 x Receiving Blanket
3 x Disposable Towels
4 x Sterile gauze sponges
2 x OB towelettes
1 x scalpel
1 x Bulb Syringe
2 x Umbilical Cord Clamps
1 x Placenta Bag
2 x Twist Ties
1 x OB Pad

Hemostatic/Trauma Kit attached to end (Not pictured):

2 x Trauma Shears (you can see them on the outside of the bag in the first picture)
2 x Crappy Tourniquets (I'll get better ones soon...I have CATs, SWAT-T, and SOF-Ts in other kits...They're in the AR mag pouch)
2 x NAR S-Rolled (compressed) gauze
1 x Israeli bandage
1 x Quik-Clot powder (old style)
3 x HemCon 4"x4" bandage

Minor Aid Kit (admin pouches on end of bag...will be replaced with dedicated pouch and more complete "commercial" first aid kit items):

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Blist-o-ban blister treatments
Misc Meds (Right now only Ibuprofen and generic immodium)
Ambesol for sore teeth
Misc Band-aids
Misc wound-cleaning pads/stuff

I have Water-Jel bandages but our SOP is loose, dry bandages. I'm debating on including them in this kit. I'll be getting some burn stuff (burn sheet and minor burn-gel) soon and will probably have a dedicated burn pouch attached to the side.

NPAs and OPAs are EMT stuff around here so we're not allowed to do it. I have one in the kit (in case someone qualified is around) but might take it off.

I have other kits for active shooter/tactical situations. This kit is what I would bring to a medical incident where significant tactical issues don't apply.

Please tell me what needs to go in, what should come out, and what you think.

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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by Quad-Response » Tue May 24, 2011 6:49 am

Good start Buddy :)

Get some Duck tap on or in there somewhere. If no oxygen at hand then I would take the BVM out and replace it with a CPR mask with filter, Also no suction device. Lose the OP if you are unable to use it yourself, there are various sizes of these so either have a full set for someone else to use of take that one out. Keep ACS but add other types if you want.

Get more water because once this bottle opened its no longer sterile. Normasole sachets or small 20ml bottles etc would the easiest solution. Lose the micropore paper tape, get some Zinc Oxide instead along with maybe some Transpore tape.

Get a couple more ice packs, just having the one is asking for trouble if for some reason it gets activated/busted into. Also I would bother with the smaller gauze dressings, replace them with some more of the larger ones you have.

Get some bandage scissors as well (blunt-blunt or blunt-sharp) pointy ones are likely to further injure casualty in the heat of the moment.

This is just a quick list, as above. Good start but now its time to tweak. I am sure others will probably not agree with what I have put above but this is how I would change things. Also I am sure I have missed some things but other I am sure will help with that.

Keep it going buddy, nice little kit once its tweaked a little more.
Regards
Chris

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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by TacAir » Tue May 24, 2011 10:01 am

An observation and a comment.

I would lose the Obstetrical Kit for the same reason you should lose the OPA. Now, if you are carrying it for posible duty use, I would suggest checking with your legal dept. - just to be certain you are fully indemnified. If you do pull that bit of kit, add more 5x9 and 4x4 pads. And duck tape.... (end comment)

I didn't see a penlight (for checking pupillary response) or a headlamp for hands-free night work. (end observation)

Very nice kit, well laid out/well thought out. THanks for the post & photos.
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SoCalDep
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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by SoCalDep » Tue May 24, 2011 11:19 pm

See...I knew I'd forget something obvious!

I have duct tape in several other kits, including a small kit attached to my vest. So I do have some, but I need to grab an old gift card and wrap some to put in this kit. Thanks!

The OPA is gone.

As for the BVM...I've done and seen CPR enough to know I really don't wanna be that close to a stranger, particularly after hearing about the cop who did CPR on an infant and died five years later from an infection from when the kid vomited in his mouth. I know a CPR mask is a one way valve, but I'm keeping the BVM. I have CPR masks in two of my other kits so a mask will be available in the more portable kits.

As for the obstetrical kit, we actually have been trained in its use and having responded to a pending "beautiful moment" I thought I'd keep the items. I'm also figuring some of the items are multi-use such as the bulb syringe, etc. It is for on-duty use as I am neutered...My wife BETTER not need it! It does take up some room, so if I find some items of greater importance, I'll seriously consider dumping it to my backstock of stuff.

I'll check on the water. I carry lots of water anyway since I work in the desert and the eye-stuff is more for blowing dust and ash from the common fires during the summer/fall. I'll have to look into your suggestions as they may end up taking up less room per use and therefore be more efficient. I almost picked up some saline solution for wound irrigation but it was big and hard to fit in the bag...the smaller containers might be perfect.

I have tons of the micropore tape...It's primary use...taping the cord from my GPS to the dash and putting on the steering wheel so I can write notes. But like I said...I have tons. I'll take your advice and upgrade for the med kit.

I have backstock of most of the supplies in the bag. If it's used I can replace almost immediately. As for the cold-pack, I had two in there but they were the bigger versions and took up too much room. I hate having "1" of almost anything, so I'll probably look for another of these smaller packs. I think I ended up using the other one a few months ago. The larger ones I'll keep for home use.

I probably should have specified the use for this kit a bit better to give a better perspective for comments. I work in law enforcement in a large area that ranges from populated city to very rural deserts and mountains. The climate ranges from freezing snow in the winter to 110 degree plus summers. I have several "first aid" kits to include a small kit carried in a pouch on my vest (Quik-Clot 1st response, Petrolatum gauze, two 4"x4" gauze, duct tape around a gift card), small kits on my active shooter vest and shotgun rig, a large kit on my primary drop-leg "oh crap let's go" rig, and a larger trauma kit in a "Recon Mountaineer" Corpsman bag attached to the rear of my active shooter rig. The purpose of the kit pictured above is to provide more advanced tools within my training and scope of practice and some SHTF sustainment items as well. I had some triage stuff in there but I took it out and I think I'm going to move it to my patrol bag or a dedicated disaster bag. In most cases fire dept is going to show up at some point so my main concern is minor stuff we aren't going to call fire for, and life-threatening/serious injuries pending the arrival of fire, which is usually pretty fast but sometimes ten minutes or more. I carry WAY too much medical stuff, but it's sorta my hobbie (I'm no expert) so I'll keep trying different configurations until I get what I like. Then I'll probably change it again.

Thank you all very much for the suggestions and keep 'em coming...I'll post updates as they occur.

Oh yea...I have lots-o-lights and a headlamp in my largest trauma kit. I do plan on purchasing one for this kit as well though. Thanks for the suggestion!

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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by wguy00 » Thu May 26, 2011 11:51 am

I don't have anything to offer, but I've got a question for you. You say you're trained to the first responder level, but not EMT. Is your training inline with this class offering from a local community college?
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The reason I ask is that this class is something that I'm interested in. I've got my Red Cross CPR and first aid, but would like to get some training above that level, but not necessarily a full EMT certification. If this class sounds similar to what you're certified in, do you recommend the training? Was it worth it?

Thank you,
David
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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by thorian » Thu May 26, 2011 1:23 pm

If you want the space of the BVM you can always do Compression only CPR. I Have done compression only until someone produced a barrier device. Then we broke into 2 rescuer CPR. Granted it was only 2 minutes of compressions but for lay responders the AHA is endorsing compression only.
VOL FF 1 & 2, EMT-B, Hazmat Ops, Vehicle Extrication Technician, High angle rescue technician, and that is just the hobby...

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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by Medic Mentor » Thu May 26, 2011 4:44 pm

wguy00 wrote:I don't have anything to offer, but I've got a question for you. You say you're trained to the first responder level, but not EMT. Is your training inline with this class offering from a local community college?
Image

The reason I ask is that this class is something that I'm interested in. I've got my Red Cross CPR and first aid, but would like to get some training above that level, but not necessarily a full EMT certification. If this class sounds similar to what you're certified in, do you recommend the training? Was it worth it?

Thank you,
David
That looks like the First Responder Certification, look on the NREMT.org web page and you will see that it is the level just below EMT. Heavy on the practical parts of EMT training. Mini EMT training that is good for folks who support EMT B, I or P caring for patients--LEO or FF.

Also good to prep for EMT course, but I would skip it and go straight to EMT course. (Save money and time).

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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by Ovationman » Thu May 26, 2011 4:49 pm

I would also recommend a good look at Wilderness first responder . WFR gives a massive amount of practical skills and focus on the wilderness/non conventional setting. Likely a better choice, unless you plan on working in an EMS setting.

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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by Medic Mentor » Thu May 26, 2011 5:42 pm

Ovationman wrote:I would also recommend a good look at Wilderness first responder . WFR gives a massive amount of practical skills and focus on the wilderness/non conventional setting. Likely a better choice, unless you plan on working in an EMS setting.
I agree, the worst problem is the lack of the WFR courses. There is the Wilderness and Remote First Aid Course from the Red Cross (just went thru it and plan to teach it). You have to have your HCP CPR card before going to it. It is 16 hours min in length, covers a lot of ground. Sort of a First Responder course with caring for victims in a remote environment not in the meat and salmon aisle at Costco.

Tough to find a happy medium. The Red Cross Course has little tactical medicine information or techniques. Veyr basic approach to controlling and stopping bleeding. And I understand that it is going thru revision as we speak, but....

The big question is what is the goal of the person who desires training, if they want and need a course to get into EMS; FR or EMT B, I or P then you got no choice. The prospects of getting into a Paramedic course is very poor. It is a long tough path. And the amount of colleges that teach have many applications for small amount of seats. Right now with the NREMT reformatting and making EMT EMT-Advanced (used to be I) and EMT P; many states have to do massive reallignment. Costly and time consuming. (Standardization across US is a fantasy!).

If you could care less about getting a "certificate" and want the training for yourself if the SHTF-IE Joplin or worse. Then there are other alternatives. The market is growing quickly for that, but the folks who teach are worried about if the students they teach--understand their scope of practice and understand the skills taught oare for "personal use."

And for folks leaving the military with training skill sets and sometimes incredibile experiences---that is another thread.

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Re: First Responder (Non-EMT) Kit Critique

Post by SoCalDep » Fri May 27, 2011 12:52 pm

wguy00 wrote:I don't have anything to offer, but I've got a question for you. You say you're trained to the first responder level, but not EMT. Is your training inline with this class offering from a local community college?
Image

The reason I ask is that this class is something that I'm interested in. I've got my Red Cross CPR and first aid, but would like to get some training above that level, but not necessarily a full EMT certification. If this class sounds similar to what you're certified in, do you recommend the training? Was it worth it?

Thank you,
David
This sounds very similar to my training. Academy was (if I remember correctly) 24hrs of first aid. Our refresher courses are 8hrs of general first aid and four hours of CPR. Our instructor (A certified EMT and dept/red cross certified trainer) did a great job this last time of bringing in some of the more modern first aid supplies for training, including various pressure bandages, tourniquets, etc. He even set up several scenarios involving self-care, buddy-care, and caring for others in various tactical and non-tactical situations. Of course, the majority of the course is a bit more boo-boo oriented, but it's good information.

As for compression-only CPR, we are trained and expected to provide traditional CPR if a mask/barrier is available. We are required to have our department mask available on duty, thus we are expected to provide traditional CPR on duty. If off-duty and without a mask, we can do compression-only. In addition, when fire arrives on scene, if we're already using the BVM, they'll just hook it to their oxygen and replace our BVM with theirs for the next time. In addition, when trading places during CPR, we can use the same BVM instead of having to switch masks.

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