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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:40 pm 
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The SWAT-T (Stretch, Wrap and Tuck Tourniquet)

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The SWAT-T is designed to be used a an emergency tourniquet and a multi purpose dressing. The SWAT-T is essentially a 4 inch wide by 4 foot long non-latex constricting band. It is black in color, and has white lettering and symbols on it (more on that later). It comes folded and sealed in a compact plastic package, weighing in at .21 LBS. They can be purchased at Rescue Essentials for $9.25. The price and weight are very appealing, as a CAT tourniquet can cost up to $35 from many retailers.

Here is a you-tube video demonstrating application of the SWAT-T to the thigh.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KypMY7Ng6ak

Before I begin my objective review, I will give you all some background info for the SWAT-T (NOTE - This portion is taken from rescue-essentials.com)

The SWAT-T was developed by a former Operator/Medic with 14 years experience in Operational Medicine -former USAF Pararescue Journeyman (Para-Jumper or PJ)), Contractor DoJ/FBI SWAT Operations, National Registry Paramedic, and Emergency Medicine Physician.

Now, on to my review.

As an Army Reserve Medic and Search & Rescue Paramedic (working along AZ / Mexico border, as well as in the mountains of southern AZ), weight is a serious issue, as I must carry all of my equipment into the scene with me. We usually work in 4 man teams, but are still limited in the equipment we can carry. I normally carry my STOMP II, which is a great bag, but still has limitations. I don't have an ambulance at my immediate disposal, and my average evac time, not including the time to locate the casualty and stabilize can be up to 1 or 2 hours due to the remote locations I often work in.

As a result, I always look for products that work well, but are also lightweight and compact. As a quick reference, you can fit 2 of these in the amount of space it takes to store 1 ETB dressing. And as if the size and weight aren't a big plus, the SWAT-T is a multipurpose bandage. Although it is marketed mainly as a tourniquet, it also functions as a pressure dressing and as an elastic bandage.

(For photos of the SWAT-T in use [WARNING - GRAPHIC PHOTOS] visit http://swattourniquet.com/photos.html).

When used as a tourniquet, the SWAT-T is simply wrapped and stretched around the injured extremity, and then tucked under itself to secure in place. As mentioned above, there are several symbols placed on the band with some simple instructions for use. Basically, if the Ovals with rectangles in them become Circles with squares in them, then it is tight enough to be a tourniquet. Simple, effective, Soldier Proof.

Additionally, the fact that this tourniquet is elastic offers an advantage over traditional cloth or mechanical tourniquets. There is no debating that a tourniquet may often be necessary to save a life during severe extremity hemorrhage, but certain types of hemorrhage involve special treatment. Due to the elasticity of the SWAT-T, it lends itself very well to assist in the management of Inguinal or Axillary bleeds (High Groin / Armpit region), whereas a traditional cloth or mechanical tourniquet (i.e., CAT or SOF) may not be able to conform to the anatomy of the area as well.

The symbols also come in handy when using it as a pressure dressing - you will know if the dressing os to tight by observing the symbols (DISCLAIMER - it is STILL recommended to check for a distal pulse after applying the dressing). This is pretty self explanatory - either pack the wound channel with gauze or place gauze over the wound (depending on the type of wound, scope of practice, local protocol, etc), and use the SWAT-T to secure the gauze and apply pressure to the wound bed, much as you would with an ACE or other type of elastic bandage.

And while I'm on the topic of elastic bandages, the SWAT-T can fulfill that role as well - whether being used to secure ice to sprain injuries, or to stabilize a sprain in general (again, like an ace wrap). Additionally, it could be used to improvise a sling for assisting in immobilizing certain arm injuries, and to assist in setting up splints for long bone fractures. You could also use it as part of a pelvic sling as well.

It has also occurred to me that you could use one as an occlusive dressing (either use the packaging or perhaps cut a portion of the SWAT-T off).

For those of you who are looking to purchase one of these, you can also purchase a MOLLE or Belt loop pouch for your tactical gear. They are available in OD Green, Desert Tan, ACU, Multicam and Black. I will be purchasing one for my vest shortly. A review on the pouch will come in a few weeks.

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I highly recommend this product as a supplement to your existing gear. Although there are a slew of "TACTI-COOL" tourniquet products on the market today, the small size, weight and size make the SWAT-T very attractive. As does its multipurpose functionality. I will emphasize that it is still advisable to have at least 1 dedicated tourniquet (i.e.. CAT or SOF tourniquet), but this product is an excellent add-on to your existing kit.

For those of you with small IFAK's, this may be a great way to add a low cost and effective tourniquet to your IFAK. Or, for a tactical medic or Fire / EMS official, this would be a great tool to throw in your bag.

A special thanks to Jorian from Rescue Essentials for sending me a SWAT-T to evaluate.

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I hope you have all enjoyed this review. I would like to try and review at least 1 item a month for you all if you would like.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:55 pm 
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This is actually a really cool product. Only advantage something like a CAT has over this is that in the role of TQ, its retention is probably more secure. A lot of movement/dragging a casualty with this on might remove the TQ, but then again, if your moving and dragging a casualty, your doing something wrong :lol: I just thought of that as if you were dragging a guy to saftey after applying a TQ, but the majority of us on here will never (hopefully) encounter that circumstance.

I'll add a couple of these to my list to buy in the next few months.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 8:01 pm 
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Good review :) I'd happily read more.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:03 pm 
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Tperkins wrote:
This is actually a really cool product. Only advantage something like a CAT has over this is that in the role of TQ, its retention is probably more secure. A lot of movement/dragging a casualty with this on might remove the TQ....... [edit]


Exactly. I forgot to mention that in the review... I had that problem with the Tourniquick TK4 on a call about a month ago. Thats why its always good to have a few different tools for the same thing.

But, I will say this secures quite well, I think it's greater width allows it to stay in place better (friction and all that other physics stuff). I didn't get a chance to do any drag tests, but it was quite difficult to move with my fingers once it was applied.

Apache wrote:
Good review :) I'd happily read more.


Glad to hear it, I'll keep it up then!

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:07 pm 
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SteelWolf wrote:
Tperkins wrote:
This is actually a really cool product. Only advantage something like a CAT has over this is that in the role of TQ, its retention is probably more secure. A lot of movement/dragging a casualty with this on might remove the TQ....... [edit]


Exactly. I forgot to mention that in the review... I had that problem with the Tourniquick TK4 on a call about a month ago. Thats why its always good to have a few different tools for the same thing.

But, I will say this secures quite well, I think it's greater width allows it to stay in place better (friction and all that other physics stuff). I didn't get a chance to do any drag tests, but it was quite difficult to move with my fingers once it was applied.

Apache wrote:
Good review :) I'd happily read more.


Glad to hear it, I'll keep it up then!


True, and at 4' unstretched, you might be able to double-wrap it under itself for extra retention. For most of the people on here though, they dont need to worry about that, and its price point and compactness is great.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 11:14 am 
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Thanks Steel Wolf,

Well written and informative. Much appreciated.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2015 12:42 pm 
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Tperkins wrote:
SteelWolf wrote:
Tperkins wrote:
This is actually a really cool product. Only advantage something like a CAT has over this is that in the role of TQ, its retention is probably more secure. A lot of movement/dragging a casualty with this on might remove the TQ....... [edit]


Exactly. I forgot to mention that in the review... I had that problem with the Tourniquick TK4 on a call about a month ago. Thats why its always good to have a few different tools for the same thing.

But, I will say this secures quite well, I think it's greater width allows it to stay in place better (friction and all that other physics stuff). I didn't get a chance to do any drag tests, but it was quite difficult to move with my fingers once it was applied.

Apache wrote:
Good review :) I'd happily read more.


Glad to hear it, I'll keep it up then!


True, and at 4' unstretched, you might be able to double-wrap it under itself for extra retention. For most of the people on here though, they dont need to worry about that, and its price point and compactness is great.



Something I forgot to add: In many cases, limb tourniquets are applied while the injured limb is swollen. The SWAT-T holds the advantage of maintaining constriction when the swelling subsides, whereas windlass tourniquets can lose tension in those situations.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2015 3:42 pm 
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Jorian wrote:
Tperkins wrote:
SteelWolf wrote:
Tperkins wrote:
This is actually a really cool product. Only advantage something like a CAT has over this is that in the role of TQ, its retention is probably more secure. A lot of movement/dragging a casualty with this on might remove the TQ....... [edit]


Exactly. I forgot to mention that in the review... I had that problem with the Tourniquick TK4 on a call about a month ago. Thats why its always good to have a few different tools for the same thing.

But, I will say this secures quite well, I think it's greater width allows it to stay in place better (friction and all that other physics stuff). I didn't get a chance to do any drag tests, but it was quite difficult to move with my fingers once it was applied.

Apache wrote:
Good review :) I'd happily read more.


Glad to hear it, I'll keep it up then!


True, and at 4' unstretched, you might be able to double-wrap it under itself for extra retention. For most of the people on here though, they dont need to worry about that, and its price point and compactness is great.



Something I forgot to add: In many cases, limb tourniquets are applied while the injured limb is swollen. The SWAT-T holds the advantage of maintaining constriction when the swelling subsides, whereas windlass tourniquets can lose tension in those situations.


Indeed a valid point jorian, though periodically assesment of your patient should correct this.

Currently I EDC a CAT and quick-clot combat gauze, but I'm thinking about switching to the SWAT and CELOX rapid, vacuumpacked with some gloves. Should save up some space and space is good :twisted:

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 5:51 pm 
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JIM wrote:
Jorian wrote:
Something I forgot to add: In many cases, limb tourniquets are applied while the injured limb is swollen. The SWAT-T holds the advantage of maintaining constriction when the swelling subsides, whereas windlass tourniquets can lose tension in those situations.


Indeed a valid point jorian, though periodically assesment of your patient should correct this.

Currently I EDC a CAT and quick-clot combat gauze, but I'm thinking about switching to the SWAT and CELOX rapid, vacuumpacked with some gloves. Should save up some space and space is good :twisted:


You can send me the money you save! Seriously though, I have heard that the best kit is the one you can lay hands on when you need it. I don't know about you, but I'm far more likely to have a SWAT-T/Hemostatic "kit" available than a windlass TQ, if for no other reason than size and shape. Great to see you here, Jim!


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 11:22 am 
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I had the unique experience of attending a class given by one of our own a few years ago, who was the inventor of this, as I recall. It was a fun, interesting class, that covered a LOT of how TQs work, the myths, real world applications to include video and pic footage of this, and other TQs (to include field expedient ones such as 550 cord, phone cords, belts, even prayer beads-and why those items simply dont work). It was a very enlightening class, and one I walked away with that I actually retained most of what I learned :)

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 1:41 pm 
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Jorian wrote:
JIM wrote:
Jorian wrote:
Something I forgot to add: In many cases, limb tourniquets are applied while the injured limb is swollen. The SWAT-T holds the advantage of maintaining constriction when the swelling subsides, whereas windlass tourniquets can lose tension in those situations.


Indeed a valid point jorian, though periodically assesment of your patient should correct this.

Currently I EDC a CAT and quick-clot combat gauze, but I'm thinking about switching to the SWAT and CELOX rapid, vacuumpacked with some gloves. Should save up some space and space is good :twisted:


You can send me the money you save! Seriously though, I have heard that the best kit is the one you can lay hands on when you need it. I don't know about you, but I'm far more likely to have a SWAT-T/Hemostatic "kit" available than a windlass TQ, if for no other reason than size and shape. Great to see you here, Jim!


Heck, any money I save goes to international shipping costs &customs :-(

I saw this post the other day on ITS tactical: http://www.itstactical.com/medcom/medic ... ld-method/

Also, they now replaced the SWAT-T with the flat folded SOFT-T in their EDC trauma kit.. Hmm I wonder how much bigger and less comfortable it is now..

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:00 pm 
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Hey guys, I wanted to post an update. It's been a few years since I wrote this review. I still love, and use, the SWAT-T. I carry one in my work bag, and even used them as the basis of our TAC-FAK Pocket Trauma Kits, available here: http://archangeldynamics.com/products/archangel-dynamics-tacfak-pocket-trauma-kit for anyone who is interested.

Another use I only recently learned about - K9 trauma management. I took a K9 TECC Course to help prepare for my TP-C Exam. You can cut a small strip of the SWAT-T and use it as a muzzle. Humans use the MARCHE algorithm. Dogs? M3ARCHE (Muzzle, Move, Massive Hemorrhage). I'm no good to a working dog if he bites me. Now, this is of course a temporary solution, and a traditional cage style muzzle should be applied ASAP, so that dog can pant, eat and drink. While we're on the topic of K9 care, traditional windlass style tourniquets are not effective on K9 patients due to their tapered anatomy on their upper extremities. Direct pressure usually controls bleeding, but, in the event that this fails, or, the tactical situation requires you to not be dedicated to the dog, the SWAT-T is an EXCELLENT TQ for them!

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 7:38 pm 
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Good for you taking the K9 class. That's cool. I CANNOT STAND when these Tactical Medical instructors talk about dogs with actually ZERO background treating them. I'm going through my Vet Practical right now, it's supposed to be six months, I'm squeezing it into two..Now dude, off the subject, they "certify" you a a Tactical Paramedic?!?!........please don't tell me the governing body is the friggin NAEMT or the NR, pleasant God don't say them.....please say it's the D.O.D SOCOM, or other qualified unit. Not some clown who has never done any of the skills.....about the dogs, that's a cute pneumonia, TWO problems. FIRST, you shouldn't be doing the muzzling, the handler does that, and it called a basket muzzle. Now if they are injured, the get nothing by mouth, so they don't need to eat and sure as hell don't need to eat. It's tough through those type muzzles anyway. Another thing, you have to also go over the procedure if the handler gets hurt, see must all of those dogs don't "speak" English. Hungarian, Bulgarian, Italian, and German are common. I'm talking about their commands from the handler. Now that you have that info, you've gotta go and spend some time at the vets handling more patients. There is an art to holding animals for procedures and ill bet knew w of these clowns that teach this shit know it. Also, try the RATS tourniquet, that's what I have been using


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 1:09 pm 
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Yea, I can translate that to English now after some sleep. I'm impressed you took the class. It irks the shit out of me to see medics stating they can treat K9's, and they have no degree or experience. Trust me, the practical for a vet degree, a BS is six months, I'm cramming it into two and I'm not doing very well. Yep, they tell you to muzzle, but you won't be able to do it without the handler. Nope. If it's injured, it'll fear bite....and either way, they cannot drink or eat if injured. They have to be tubed. I've intubated over 200 dogs and had some of them yack over everything, puke just pouring out of them. The panting is the big deal, they need to pant. I don't know if they mentioned it, but a battery powered shaver is key also, especially with those animals with a heavy coat. If you are serious about the K9 stuff, look into the pharmacology. Telazol, and other knock out meds are key. You will get nothing done without it and a good tech to hold. Propophol, I use all the time on dogs, just has virtually no half life. You also don't need a line on some dogs, if you need to give smaller volumes, you can go subq. I use this small black rubber tourniquet for twelve hours every friggin tues/thurs to for venous occlusion, I bet if I tightened it a little, it'd occlude arterial, it's a weird little German design I think. My boss went to school in Berlin. I'd try the RATS. The SWAT T covers up too much surface for me. I need to see more. This is on K9's though.....Now, someone explain to me how you get certified as a Tactical Medic? The last time I was in the USA, I don't remember it. I have zero respect for either the NAEMT or the NR. How is the instructor certified? SOCOM? Please don't say it's some T3 thing.....good luck man.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 6:18 pm 
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IANMCDEVITT wrote:
...they "certify" you a a Tactical Paramedic?!?!........please don't tell me the governing body is the friggin NAEMT or the NR, pleasant God don't say them.....please say it's the D.O.D SOCOM, or other qualified unit.


The IBSC (International Board of Specialty Certification), not NREMT (LOL thank God right!?), the same agency that sets the standards for FP-C (Flight) and CCP-C (Critical Care) also oversee TP-C. The TP-C exam is very extensive, covering 17 critical domains including knowledge of TCCC, K9 medicine, management of austere medical emergencies, some critical care stuff (not to the same level as FP-C or CCP-C), small unit tactics and more.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:12 am 
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Wow, never knew that. Never hear any stuff like that.....aaaa, Americans. And they teach you SUT? I would think CQB. Supporting cops is a lot different from battlefield medicine. I learned SUT at a place called, "Building 4" in Georgia, Ft. Benning. I'm always interested in learning something though.


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