Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Discussions of the best (or worst) equipment to have on hand for use in the event of an injury during an emergency.

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echo83
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Re: Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Post by echo83 » Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:17 pm

When I ran cross country races, we would wolf down small tubes of Dec a Cake cake frosting before a race. (Usually three miles.) Now, even looking at a tube of Dec a Cake seems to get my pulse racing. It's a good mixture of sugar and carbs that are fast-acting.

Skittles and Starburst candy work, too, and are widely available.

Here's a little info from the folks at Yale regarding "dosages."

http://diabetes.yale.edu/newpatients/hypoglycemia.aspx

A word of caution; the boost in energy is pretty temporary, and crashing sucks.

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VXMerlinXV
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Re: Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Post by VXMerlinXV » Wed Sep 06, 2017 9:11 am

echo83 wrote:
A word of caution; the boost in energy is pretty temporary, and crashing sucks.
Absolutely, the rescue sugars are only used in order to keep the patient conscious long enough to eat something long acting.
My posts are my opinion, and do not reflect the standing or policy of any group I may be associated with. Nothing typed here should be considered medical advice, or permission from myself or any governing body to perform medical intervention. If this is a medical emergency, please get off your computer and dial the appropriate local response number.

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teotwaki
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Re: Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Post by teotwaki » Wed Sep 06, 2017 12:16 pm

Laevatein wrote:I use oral glucose ... I metabolizes much quicker, and it's a viscus liquid.

Dude! You came out of the woodwork! :mrgreen:

Why do you currently use the tablets? You can always PM me if you don't want to say anything about this in public.
My adventures and pictures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com

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mace
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Re: Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Post by mace » Thu Sep 07, 2017 8:49 pm

I like Laffy Taffy myself multiple flavors and pretty cheap

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Laevatein
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Re: Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Post by Laevatein » Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:15 pm

I use oral glucose... it metabolizes quicker.
'oderint dum metuant'

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teotwaki
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Re: Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Post by teotwaki » Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:26 pm

Laevatein wrote:I use oral glucose... it metabolizes quicker.
Don't say that on your Facebook page, LOL. You will get beaten up for it! (J/K)
My adventures and pictures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com

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Re: Bug-out-bag item: Glucose tablets

Post by ColoradoMtnMan » Sun Nov 12, 2017 8:14 am

If a patient is responsive and able to maintain their airway then I'd be more inclined to feed them a mixture of sugar and protein so that it slowly has it's affect.

If a patient is unresponsive of suspected diabetic issue then it would be a direct contradiction to place a tablet in the airway.

In the ambulance we carry a tube of "Oral Glucose" which is 25 grams of glucose in suspension. This may be administered via the sublingual or buccal route but it must be smeared on the mucosa and allowed to be absorbed. Our biggest concern here is occluding the airway or causing them to aspirate the glucose.

Cake frosting in the little tubes works just as well and doesn't cost much.

If a person is unresponsive and atraumatic with a history of diabetes it is appropriate to administer oral glucose to attempt to revive them. The most likely presentation that you'll see in the backcountry will be a known diabetic that is poorly compliant with their medication in the short term. Most likely it'll be a diabetic that takes their insulin but neglects to have an adequate meal with the administration. This leads to low blood sugar aka hypoglycemia. This is a life threatening condition and will cause death of cerebral tissue if not reversed quickly.
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