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Training Opportunity

Posted: Mon May 14, 2018 11:00 am
by VXMerlinXV
Hey guys,
Weekend long Wilderness Med training coming up in Jersey in September.

Topics include:

Bleeding Control (BCON)


Participants will learn the basics of bleeding control that can be used to save lives during traumatic events. Tourniquet application, wound packing, and pressure dressings will be taught and practiced by students on bleeding and training simulators. A BCON certificate will be issued to participants that complete the session.

NRA Home Firearms Safety
Instructor: Cameron Green




This combined class will allow students teach how to unload and make safe various types of firearms such as revolvers, semi automatic handguns, rifles, and shot guns.

Students who meet the qualifications will receive the NRA Home Fire Arms Safety certifications.

Fire arms and ammunition will be provided and are included in registration. OUTSIDE FIRE ARMS AND AMMUNITION ARE NOT PERMITTED.

High Angle Rescue
Instructor: Dave Bell & Matt Heston




Introduction into repelling and an overview of high angle rescue. Students will receive a safety briefing, learn how to secure a patient for high angle extrication, assessment, field treatment, and extrication of injured patients that have fallen from heights. Students will need to improvise splinting and litters to transport patients. Students can put into practice what they learn by rappelling off of the 60 foot tower.

Tactical Practicals


Practice of Tactical Combat Casualty Care and patient assessment practiced in low light environments using chem lights, no light environments using night vision goggles, and cumbersome level B hazmat suits.

An overview of body armor, gear bags, and IFAK kits will be displayed and explained.

*Participants must have completed a prior BCON session or have a certification in TECC/TCCC/BCON prior to attending this session

W.E.T. Medicine: Wilderness / Environmental / Tropical
Instructor: Dr Thomas




Students will learn about altitude disorders, mammal and marine life animal injuries and envenomation, cold, heat, lightning strike emergencies, vector borne illnesses, motion sickness

Wound Care and Suture Lab
Instructor: Dr Bartamus


Care and treatment of soft tissue injuries. When to close a wound, when not to close a wound; when is appropriate to use butterfly bandages, wound glue, sutures, skin staples, or just let it go; indications of antibiotics; and care of infected wounds. Participants will be able to practice the skills on training devices.

Wilderness Survival


Water purification, food safety, fire and shelter building

Check it out:

http://snjemsc.com/aems/

Re: Training Opportunity

Posted: Sat May 19, 2018 6:47 pm
by SteelWolf
Great opportunity for those in Jersey!

Re: Training Opportunity

Posted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:18 pm
by VXMerlinXV
Hey Guys,
Got back after a very soggy weekend, but learned a ton. Here's a quick overview:

NRA Home Firearms Safety
Instructor: Cameron Green


Great class. Learned unloading process on more than two dozen guns, from blackpowder on up. Also fired a variety of weapons, looking at the difference between pistol rounds, rifle, and various shotgun loadings. Definitely worth while just for basic weapons familiarity.

High Angle Rescue
Instructor: Dave Bell & Matt Heston

This is where I pushed myself. I don't like heights, and rappelling in the rain was a challenge for me. Wound up with a High Angle awareness level cert, which will be nice if I get the opportunity to take a tech/operations level course




Tactical Practicals


This wound up as a combo low light/no light workshop as well as a low access scenario (pt's trapped in rubble, and only asses the parts you can see or visualize with a fiber optic camera). Terrific training, went through chem lights, NVG's and complete blackout, which all represented interesting challenges. Intubated through a pair of NVG's, which took some serious effort. Getting TQ's on in darkness is something I have done before, but assessing their effectiveness without visualization is nothing I ever tried. Wound packing is also equally difficult like this.


Wound Care and Suture Lab
Instructor: Dr Bartamus


Terrific training, informative lecture, hands on portion was thorough.

All in all well worth it. A bit of down time in the evenings, which was fine, but I would definitely pack a book next time (lousy cell reception in camp). A lot of good conversations, and attendees included reps from a variety of EMS groups, hospitals, rescue companies, and medical professionals. Food was good, and coffee was available at almost any time.

Re: Training Opportunity

Posted: Sun Sep 16, 2018 1:47 am
by IANMCDEVITT
The Tactical Practical's sound like it was more of a technical rescue ? If it was Tech Rescue, I 'll bet you know the gear and threat are extremely different. What stage of care did they say you were entering in ? What type of NOD's did you use and was their any coverage of SELF AID - BUDDY AID - MEDIC AID ? I'm thinking if it was a Tactical scenario they gave you, the TQ ideally would have been on prior to your contact. In which case, when it's your turn to brief (in Tactical Medicine ), just tell them to place the tourniquet as high as possible and AS TIGHT AS POSSIBLE, so you being able to assess blood loss would be moot. You could go directly for the tourniquet and before MOVING ANYONE, tighten the shit out of it. Your assessment of their blood loss would affect their responsiveness (you could tie it to that), so you get your friggin head down there in the patients ear, grab their hand, speak and squeeze to communicate. Sounds like a good class though. I'm kind of Anti-suturing in the field. The % of infection is through the roof.

Re: Training Opportunity

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:06 pm
by VXMerlinXV
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Hey guys,
Looks like they are running the weekend again! I found it useful last year, and if you are in the area I highly recommend it.

Re: Training Opportunity

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 12:24 pm
by VXMerlinXV
Ian, I'm not sure how I missed this post a year ago, hang on a sec, I'll run through it.

The Tactical Practical's sound like it was more of a technical rescue ? If it was Tech Rescue, I 'll bet you know the gear and threat are extremely different. What stage of care did they say you were entering in ? What type of NOD's did you use and was their any coverage of SELF AID - BUDDY AID - MEDIC AID ? I'm thinking if it was a Tactical scenario they gave you, the TQ ideally would have been on prior to your contact. In which case, when it's your turn to brief (in Tactical Medicine ), just tell them to place the tourniquet as high as possible and AS TIGHT AS POSSIBLE, so you being able to assess blood loss would be moot. You could go directly for the tourniquet and before MOVING ANYONE, tighten the shit out of it. Your assessment of their blood loss would affect their responsiveness (you could tie it to that), so you get your friggin head down there in the patients ear, grab their hand, speak and squeeze to communicate. My review of this section was a little off. The tactical side was a collection of TCCC and ALS skills in varied light conditions. They did identify when a procedure would be inappropriate in various TEMS stages (IE, don't try to intubate through NVG's during the care under fire portion of care). I did find the basics very useful, as I had never tried several skills in complete darkness The only scenario was the collapsed structure station, which was not presented as a tactical problem.

Sounds like a good class though. I'm kind of Anti-suturing in the field. The % of infection is through the roof.This was presented as an advanced skills lab, and definitely not suggested as a wilderness skill. The explanation given was for disaster scenarios where EMS and hospital personnel might find themselves in a shelter or CCP with the same patients for days on end and wind up assisting, as was the case with Hurricane season in 2017