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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 3:45 am 
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So I've been on here a while I figured I'd put my my first post up. Mods if this is in the wrong place please move it. Thanks.

I built this bag as an cool weather faster moving ghb, this is mentioned to layer with my EDC bag. This we be last ditch having to leave the car or Jeep or stuck for a few days. . To say in advance the rifle doesn't stay in my trunk. That only gets thrown in for longer road trips. Both me and the girlfriend are liscenced to carry to we usually are carrying where legal. I originally posted this bag as an instructable.
This bag is meant to take a less tactical looking approach during a disaster while still being able to hunt and protect your self. With proper rationing and using your surroundings for water and small game this bag should be able to sustain one person needs for 5 days ish with some rationing of meals. . This bag and my EDC covers the needs of food, water, shelter, fire, navigation, and security.
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When I might need to leave my vehicle behind and walk home. And I need to not stand out but still able to have security, most areas walking down the street with a visible weapon might draw unwanted attention.

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First to start my EDC on body carry is a 150 lumen flashlight, a Kershaw blur folding knife, a Leatherman rebar multitool, a compact 9mm handgun in the waist band holster, spare magazine, a bandana, bic lighter, my lucky zippo,$20 in $5 and $1 minimum,2 pairs nitrile gloves, also Chapstick which is flammable and a great multiple use item from chapped lips to fire making. . a spare pocket holster for the handgun in the car.

WATER STORAGE AND PURIFICATION
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Having multiple ways to get water and treat it is probably the most important aspect of any survival situation wheather it's urban or wilderness environments. I have 2 nalgene bottles which I have found to be pretty much indestructible after years of use. I have one bottle wrapped in 15 feet of duct tape. The 2nd bottle is nested with with a gsi stainless canteen cup.

2- nalgene bottles (full)
1- sawyer mini water filter with straw
1- 1lt platypus water bladder for carrying extra water.
1- gsi canteen to boil water if needed
1- Folding stove with fuel to boil water and cook as needed.
1- bottle potable aqua tablets
(50 tablets)

When grabbing my bag from the trunk of my car I will top off the nalgene bottles and platypus bladder from a gallon jug and small water bottles before I leave the vehicle behind.
Having many options are able to use the folding stove that you can burn the fuel tablets to boil water, use potable aqua tablets to treat as you walk, mini filter to drink from puddles. or uses a squeeze filter system. Using maps of your area to follow water sources to your final destination is the best option. instead of searching and hoping for water. Exertion of carrying a pack and moving quickly will dehydrate you faster. Next pics of my snacks in the trunk, gallon of water, also photo copies of the map to navigate through areas not as familiar to you. Also find water sources and other possible supplies just Incase I also have a ground pad in the trunk. I will decide whether it's worth the weight for the walk,same thing with snacks.

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FOOD... NEED CALORIES FOR FUEL
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For food I went with light weight and decent amount of calories and minimal cooking needed. Most everything can be ate on the move. I have also added coffee and tea for a caffeine boost.
1- MRE entree w/ heater
1- MRE brownie w/peanut butter packet
1- MRE cracker w/cheese spread packet
2- oatmeal packages
8- fruit bars
6- individual coffee packs
4- cream packs
4- lemon tea bags and honey packets
6- vegetable bouillon cubes at add flavor to bland meals or game.
2-spoons.
....forgot pictures of 4 retort tuna packs and 4 mayo packets, plastic forks(2). Small bag of par boiled rice as filler.

Also food can be added to my pockets from trunk of the car. Cookies, fruit bars and crackers from previous pictures with water jug .
folding stove and fuel mentioned above used for making tea, coffee, oatmeal.

If food begins to run low I can use the
.22 rifle with scope to hunt small game if needed. with 200 rounds of ammo

SHELTER/ WARMTH
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For shelter I have a given my self a layered lightweight approach
1-ultralight homemade silnylon 8x10" tarp with aluminum stakes
1-small 7*7 foot wool blanket
1- SOL space blanket
2-55 gallon heavy duty contactor bags.
With these materials I have coverage from wind and rain with the tarp. I pre strung the tarp with blaze orange paracord (I got sick of tripping over lines) I open the trash bag and put in the wool blanket then the space blanket inside of both for an improvised sleeping bag. All pieces are good at keeping you warm and dry.
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For additional layers I have
1- pair of merino wool ski socks. great when wet they still insulate great. I swear by these socks as many people I know. They're warm, don't intch like traditional wool. And don't get funky after being worn too long :D
1- ski hat/or Jeep cap... Always wearing a baseball hat
1- mechanix gloves.. hand protection
1- boots to put on when I leave the car.
1- insulated bandana fleece lined
1- regular bandana
1-boxers
1- safety glasses, eye protection.

[img].https://cdn.instructables.com/FVE/H2KJ/ ... MEDIUM.jpg[/img]]
This is most of my main pouch contents.

FIRST AID AND MEDICAL SUPPLY
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This first aid kit is usually in my EDC bag I carry. I have also upgraded the crappy tourniquet to a CAT Tourniquet. Added EMT shears.. Also have taken out the little bottle of vodka and added more gauze rolls. (2). Old pics so I'll update my EDC FAK soon.

To say risk of injury during a disaster and walking home is an understatement. Having a basic understanding of treating injuries as well as first aid kit. I have a basic kit for treating a deep puncture wounds as well as cuts blisters and sprains

2 quick clot sponges,
1- CAT tourniquet
4- gauze pads 4*4
1-Israeli style compression bandage.
1- neosporin tube
1- visine eye drops, helps with debris in the eyes or allergies
3- roll of 4"gauze
4- pairs nitrile gloves and 2-pairs on body EDC.
1- roll of paper tape
bag on right-
various bandages, bandaids, butterfly sutures, glacier gel blister pads.(awesome bandages for blisters and burns)
1- large pill fob. filled with amodium, Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Aleve, and benadryl, any Rx meds on body.
1- small hand sanitizer bottle.. also flammable liquid for fire starting.
1-large magic marker for marking treatments on someone and righting notes on map pages you took out of atlas

SECURITY/ HUNTING/ ZOMBIE PROTECTION

Please follow all your state and local laws when adding firearms/magazines/ammo/ knives as well as have safety training before handling any weapon. I am liscenced to carry in my state, which also allows me to carry a firearm during a state of emergency, your local laws may vary.

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For travel with a rifle and ease of carrying much more ammo than a center fire rifle I choose a Ruger 10/22 take down rifle modified with a folding stock and pistol grip and red dot scope. I have 3- 25 round magazines loaded in the top of my pack as well as a 10 round magazine. Plus spare 15 rounds in the pistol grip handle.(magazines will be loaded once S has Hit the F til then til then ammo is in an ammo can in the trunk.)On the folding stock I have braided paracord as an extra back up of cordage. about 60 feet.
100-rounds of .22 for reloading magazines in pack (CCI mini mags)
25-rounds of 9mm hollow points (Speer gold dots)
25-.380 hollow points
4- magazines loaded with 85 rounds of .22 should be plenty of hunting and self-defense ammo on my way home. I don't plan on playing Rambo. i plan on avoiding any Confrontations whenever possible. I will only have the rifle assembled when crossing thru wooded terrain where I may run into small game or camped for the night. My 9mm will be accessible at all times as well as my girlfriend's..380.

It's important to look as low profile as possible in the early days of a longer term disaster. If the situation seems bad enough the stock can be folded in and the rifle can be carried some what discreetly. I wouldn't recommend it as walking around with a rifle may draw attention when you are trying to get home, but it is possible. I plan to travel out of the way to avoid larger crowds and people. A few hour drive could turn in to many days+ walking especially if people are rioting and situations have got worse. And travel has to be slow and deliberate.If cell service is still available apps like scanner.radio are great for hearing about activity and where to avoid.

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This is where the safety glasses and mechanix gloves come in. If you have ever been walking through the woods and had a twig fly back and hit you in the face you will see the benefits of clear glasses walking/running through the woods at night. One stick to the eye could stop you from progressing. Same principal with mechanix gloves is you can push through sticker bushes, catch falls, and be able to work your way through damaged building and over grown areas. For minimal weight and low price these are in all my packs and vehicles.
Same with bandanas multiple uses and can provide protection for your face.
Without your hands,feet, or eyes working properly survival will be much harder and take much more adaption, and really slow your movement down.

NAVIGATION,MAPS/ MORALE BOOSTS/. SANITATION/CORDAGE

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The small pouch in the first has the very basic will be attached to my belt when leaving my car, this
pouch stays in my EDC bag.

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1- fire steel w/pill fob filled with cotton balls and Vaseline,
the bottle of potable aqua
2-20 foot pieces of paracord
1- wet fire tinder cube
1- folded piece of foil.
1- button compass with clip
1- match container wrapped in duct tape, filled with matches, misc. hooks, sinkers, and 50 feet of fishing line.


Back pocket of backpack has
2 packs of folded TP. about a half roll+
Not shown is a small garden shovel...
also 2- S biners for attaching gear to your pack or drying socks/ boxers while walking.and a magic towel for cleaning the canteen cup and yourself as needed, I would wash between the two cleanings haha. :clap:

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Minimal space and weight can go a long way to keep you sane on a hike solo or with another person. Having a mini set of playing cards can occupy time while in a safer place and keep your spirits up. Also having tea and coffee can really boost morale. It helps give a sense of normalcy.

For navigation.. I have a giant Atlas that covers every street, highway, river, stream, park, hospital and police station in my state. Having a detailed atlas in your kit is a great addition to any car kit. I have copies of 100sq miles surrounding my house already copied that I can mark water, woods and planned route as I travel. if I am farther than 100 miles from home and have to abandon my car I can rip out the pages I need and head out. that's why it stays in my trunk.

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Having the additional food and water in the trunk allows me to help others who are with me. Same with having the carhartt style jacket for someone else who is wearing lighter clothes. With gear in the trunk, my ghb, and my EDC bag 2 people could be relatively comfortable while stuck or getting home.

-Not pictured
- headlamp with spare batteries for headlamp and flashlight
-.backup phone charger
-Cigarettes (don't smoke) good for information on the street. as well as carrying an ember to a fire. If you don't smoke I wouldn't carry them. I'm trying to quit again soon. :shock:

I know that this will inevitably be noticed that I don't have a fixed blade in my kit. For one reason I have 2 razor sharp blades on my Leatherman and my Kershaw will do most anything I need. If I was going to be out for a while I absolutely would be putting in a fixed blade. I don't plan on batoning wood while I'm getting home. I have done mock hikes and I can set up a semi comfortable shelter and have a fire with scavenged wood with any blade. I figured it will add weight that'll slow me down getting home. Also more weight is more likely to get hurt rolling an ankle or falling In my experience.
Oh and the bag is a Northface Terra 30. Nice lightweight and streamline, good stretch that keeps everything in place. Normal trips this would be a day or 2 summer bag. Getting home isn't about comfort it's more speed for me.

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I would like to get some input on what I forgot and what others would add or take away. Thanks everyone.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:33 pm 
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I like it. Good gear with good focus on medical stuff. One recommendation I would make is to switch out the space blanket for one of these: https://www.amazon.com/TITAN-Extra-Thic ... +bag&psc=1

Basically the same thing, but it has sealed seams and is shaped like a sleeping bag, so it'll heat up faster and be easier to keep yourself covered with it during the night. I got two for my bags. They were a little cheaper and camo-colored when I bought mine.

I also have to question the wisdom of the rifle for a grey man GHB. If it's for getting food, I think it would be much less efficient to carry the weight of the rifle than to just pack extra rations. How far do you anticipate having to walk home with your bag, accounting for your usual travel/work patterns? 50 miles or less? I just put a little extra food in mine. More efficient.

If it's for defense, the issue arises that holding a rifle attracts attention. You can hide a folded 10/22 under a duster (I've tried), but is it worth it? I'd ditch it and stick a few extra magazines for the pistol in the bag, or in a double mag pouch you can stick on your belt if you need to go guerilla to get home. I'd also stick a big knife in there as an auxiliary weapon, because I like big knives.

ETA: Is that keychain compass your only one? I would add a boy scout style map compass, or a military lensatic one. Probably the scout one, because I trust them to work for under $20. Cheap military-style compasses are dubious, and I'm a cheap bastard.

I like the pack itself. Very grey. Mine is olive drab and has molle, which isn't ideal.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:14 pm 
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redcabeca wrote:
I like it. Good gear with good focus on medical stuff. One recommendation I would make is to switch out the space blanket for one of these: https://www.amazon.com/TITAN-Extra-Thic ... +bag&psc=1

Basically the same thing, but it has sealed seams and is shaped like a sleeping bag, so it'll heat up faster and be easier to keep yourself covered with it during the night. I got two for my bags. They were a little cheaper and camo-colored when I bought mine.

I also have to question the wisdom of the rifle for a grey man GHB. If it's for getting food, I think it would be much less efficient to carry the weight of the rifle than to just pack extra rations. How far do you anticipate having to walk home with your bag, accounting for your usual travel/work patterns? 50 miles or less? I just put a little extra food in mine. More efficient.

If it's for defense, the issue arises that holding a rifle attracts attention. You can hide a folded 10/22 under a duster (I've tried), but is it worth it? I'd ditch it and stick a few extra magazines for the pistol in the bag, or in a double mag pouch you can stick on your belt if you need to go guerilla to get home. I'd also stick a big knife in there as an auxiliary weapon, because I like big knives.

ETA: Is that keychain compass your only one? I would add a boy scout style map compass, or a military lensatic one. Probably the scout one, because I trust them to work for under $20. Cheap military-style compasses are dubious, and I'm a cheap bastard.

I like the pack itself. Very grey. Mine is olive drab and has molle, which isn't ideal.

Yeah for a road trip I wanted to have a rifle where we stayed and my AR build isn't done yet. Lol. But all valid points. I actually have considered adding more rations and losing the rifle. I'm a big fan of knifes too. At some point I will put my Gerber prodigy in there. Also I do have a HD sleeping bag already I keep the space blanket for covering someone in shock or hypothermia it's easier than. A bag. But I'm considering adding a SOL emergency bivy it's a little bit better than just a blanket and freinfs have had good luck with it. I do have a lenstatic compass I knew I was forgetting something. Thanks for your review. I have a compass in my other bag I need to add to that. Oh and rifle is only longer distances like 150+ mile trips. Ideally I'd have my AR 15 but it's not done yet.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 3:15 pm 
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Looks like you covered the bases. My 2 cents:
-Consider adding two MRE entrees to the food pile? It can help your stomach if you eat something that more resembles what you're used to as a meal instead of just eating "snack" things, can also be a moral booster when making camp for the night. Obviously, this doesn't come into play if you're not too far from home, but it could help if you have a long ways to go.
-Have you looked at the tube kit for the Platypus to make it into a Camelbak/hydration bladder? I'm a big fan of Camelbaks personally because then I can drink on the go easier, using the bottles to refill the bladder.
-Ditto on the compass, consider a Silva to use in conjunction with your maps.
-Consider keeping your quick clot, Israeli, gauze, and maybe the CAT in a pouch/bag that is easy to grab within the pack. It might be helpful to have all of the trauma supplies together and immediately accessible if you need it. Consider having the CAT strapped to the outside of the pack, but you have to weigh that against the risk of losing it.
-I don't know what state you're in, but in some states a loaded rifle is a no go unless you're currently hunting, which I understand you said it wouldn't really be assembled unless you were hunting small game. Consider a pistol version for the AR? This could let you operate under pistol laws in terms of carrying it in the pack while also helping to keep the size and weight down. If I read correctly, you're keeping those 10/22 mags unloaded currently, why? Maybe have them preloaded so it's one less thing you have to do while getting ready for your trek.
-Consider having the girlfriend switch to a 9mm from her 380? Would eliminate you having to carry another type of ammo, bonus if she switches to a pistol your pistol shares magazines with. I understand this isn't always probable though.
-Also, can you draw that pistol from that holster with your pack on? I have trouble drawing from strong side carry when I wear a heavy pack because of where everything is, this is one of the reasons I switched to appendix carry (but I know that's not for everyone).


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 4:33 pm 
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I like it!! I'm always a fan when I see good-value-gear. All your goodies weren't "Gucci gear"... Kershaw, Ruger, KelTec, Northface... as opposed to dropping $900,000.00 on the most expensive stuff without really gaining anything in quality.

Big fan of your bag, I still need to put mine together :ohdear:

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Her secondary offense will be nagging.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 6:14 pm 
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ManInBlack316 wrote:
Looks like you covered the bases. My 2 cents:
-Consider adding two MRE entrees to the food pile? It can help your stomach if you eat something that more resembles what you're used to as a meal instead of just eating "snack" things, can also be a moral booster when making camp for the night. Obviously, this doesn't come into play if you're not too far from home, but it could help if you have a long ways to go.
-Have you looked at the tube kit for the Platypus to make it into a Camelbak/hydration bladder? I'm a big fan of Camelbaks personally because then I can drink on the go easier, using the bottles to refill the bladder.
-Ditto on the compass, consider a Silva to use in conjunction with your maps.
-Consider keeping your quick clot, Israeli, gauze, and maybe the CAT in a pouch/bag that is easy to grab within the pack. It might be helpful to have all of the trauma supplies together and immediately accessible if you need it. Consider having the CAT strapped to the outside of the pack, but you have to weigh that against the risk of losing it.
-I don't know what state you're in, but in some states a loaded rifle is a no go unless you're currently hunting, which I understand you said it wouldn't really be assembled unless you were hunting small game. Consider a pistol version for the AR? This could let you operate under pistol laws in terms of carrying it in the pack while also helping to keep the size and weight down. If I read correctly, you're keeping those 10/22 mags unloaded currently, why? Maybe have them preloaded so it's one less thing you have to do while getting ready for your trek.
-Consider having the girlfriend switch to a 9mm from her 380? Would eliminate you having to carry another type of ammo, bonus if she switches to a pistol your pistol shares magazines with. I understand this isn't always probable though.
-Also, can you draw that pistol from that holster with your pack on? I have trouble drawing from strong side carry when I wear a heavy pack because of where everything is, this is one of the reasons I switched to appendix carry (but I know that's not for everyone).


I am going to add another MRE entree, weight is minimal. I also have some 3-4 tuna pouches that are basically a meal. But I definitely understand why Adding more is advisable. I think I'll be adding another tonight.
I have gone through a few camelbacks, holes leaks etc. I'm probably going to add one to my EDC bag. Which is what my IFAK rides usually. All my trauma kit is in its own pouch and the CAT TQ is rubber banded to the top. For friends who served over seas I was told carry IFAK easily accessible. Very good points.
AR build is currently a rifle build and my next build will actually be a pistol build with a Sig brace. Which would be leagl to carry. From what I gather as long as the rifle is un-fireable and unloaded it's legal for travel. And yeah rifle is a no go unless I'm traveling any distance. I figured handguns should handle more or less anything we'd run into. At some point I would like to have matching Glock 19s or 17s for both of us. Her EDC gun is a Ruger lcp. She doesn't want anything bigger because of concealment. Lcp was the smallest reliable gun that fit her hand she would go with. My pf9 is even to big for her hands. We actually shopped around for her for probably 3 months. Ideally I would like her to grab the AR pistol and me take the rifle for a home/security setting. Same mags and ammo, but I'll carry spare ammo as long as she carrys. She's tried other guns that just don't work for her. . I know having spare matching pistol mags would be ideal. I'm currently.out of work needing a hip replacement at 33 so that's why my builds are being held up. I'm climbing the walls with a half built AR and mags but no upper yet. Already have a few buddies who are running almost the same set ups I'm building. We want anyone who is with is to be able to pick up a rifle and them all to be same controls, sights, charging handles etc. It's sad having a half built rifle sitting on my work bench and my Jeep garaged til I can get my surgery and recover. It'll take a little bit but well worth it.
Oh I just read it. I only load the 22 for range time and travel, the BX 25 mags are actually coil springs which are more likely to get spring fatigue that traditional mags. And for home defense I have more reliable weapons available. Definitely added my lenstatic compass already.
Thanks for the input

Edit. Yes I can draw while carrying the pack. I carry 4 o'clock iwb. But if I'm riding really low with the bag I can switch to pocket carry. I tend to only pocket carry for deeper concealment. Places that are legal to carry but frowned upon kind of places. I just try to be more discreet to avoid headaches. I'm supposed to get another custom holster made for owb carry soon. All leather hand sewn from my uncle. Hopefully I get around to it soon. I like owb carry for woods hikes or with a longer jacket on. Less layers to move during draws. So far iwb daily has worked fine


Last edited by Gva on Tue Feb 14, 2017 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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JeeperCreeper wrote:
I like it!! I'm always a fan when I see good-value-gear. All your goodies weren't "Gucci gear"... Kershaw, Ruger, KelTec, Northface... as opposed to dropping $900,000.00 on the most expensive stuff without really gaining anything in quality.

Big fan of your bag, I still need to put mine together :ohdear:


Thanks. I usually catch crap about the keltec because some people consider them unreliable. I have feed a few hundred rounds probably over 5-600. Of fmj , hollow points and frangible ammo of various grains. First 50 rounds a few FTE, FTF. Maybe 6 total. After that I have rapid fired multiple mags no problem at all. I also did a fluff and buff on it and I trust my life with it. Also spare parts are super cheap from keltecs site.I have a bunch of spare parts already put aside.. Man I love my Kershaw's. I have a few but the blur is my favorite EDC blade. I actually have had it for 8 yrs and the blur is up there on zero tolerance quality IMHO. Also made in the US.
Ruger LCP is what my girls carry gun is too. 10/22 has been a tried and true design. I also have a 1906 Winchester 22 pump 110 years old and still works flawlessly. Also I got great deals on the Pf9, Kershaw, GFS LCP and the bag. Keltec I got a deal new with BG check cost me 225.now they sell for 250 used Kershaw was 45. Now gander mountain sells them for 120. Gf got her lcp with a box of ammo and BG check was under.$200 out the door. We're bargain hunters. :D
I love the Northface bag. They actually stopped making mine. They have a Terra 40 and a 35 I think. Got the bag for under $100. And I'm hard on gear. I believe in testing Everything I'll be using. If it fails in practice no problem, fails when my life is depending on it. Things get ugly fast lol. Everyone I hiked, camp or shoot with does the same..
I definitely agree I'm not rocking the best brand names but it's all tested and abused by me. I do plan to spend a bit more on my AR build. Going with Magpul grip and furniture on an Anderson lower. Still deciding on my upper. Very few things will I spend the extra money for a name but things like smartwool socks, quality carry ammo( gold dots), medical gear. All Worth every penny. Same with Glock firearms..I love them just out of budget at the moment. I definitely think you can get nice quality gear with some research without breaking the bank. More money for food and other supplies :D
I even got my Jeep Cherokee limited already lifted by a buddy for $500 bucks and it needed an alternator and tires. I've had that for 6 years. I have it parked right now to save money and I can't get in with my leg messed up. Hopefully have that set up by summer. Thanks for the input


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Great Post! Well done thank you!

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raptor wrote:
Great Post! Well done thank you!

Thanks much appreciated


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What makes this a GHB and not a BOB - it seems extensive (not a bad thing) so I'm just wondering what your thoughts on some of the items are and why you included things like, for example, a .22lr for "hunting" and not just using that size/weight on more food to keep you moving home?

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00dlez wrote:
What makes this a GHB and not a BOB - it seems extensive (not a bad thing) so I'm just wondering what your thoughts on some of the items are and why you included things like, for example, a .22lr for "hunting" and not just using that size/weight on more food to keep you moving home?



I believe it is all about how far away you are from home and what sort of terrain you have to cross. Currently I only have to navigate about 10 miles of urban terrain so a pair of running shoes and a hydration pack allows me to jog home in a decent time.

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teotwaki wrote:
00dlez wrote:
What makes this a GHB and not a BOB - it seems extensive (not a bad thing) so I'm just wondering what your thoughts on some of the items are and why you included things like, for example, a .22lr for "hunting" and not just using that size/weight on more food to keep you moving home?



I believe it is all about how far away you are from home and what sort of terrain you have to cross. Currently I only have to navigate about 10 miles of urban terrain so a pair of running shoes and a hydration pack allows me to jog home in a decent time.


That's pretty much why. In in urban environment where I live I have a small hydration backpack with an IFAK, water, and my usual EDC. The use of the 22 has many factors. Factor one. If you are in a bad situation I don't know anyone who would say it's only a 22 getting hit by it. In fact Israeli soldiers have used the 10/22 for riot control with shin shots. Personally I don't want to get hit with any round. 2nd factor is lightness of ammo. Currently over 200 rnd. Way lighter than even 100 9mm. Feed this quality ammo and it will shoot accurate and reliable. 3rd Add in the takedown feature it's a small light weight gun, easy to carry and some what easy to conceal. I feel it's a multi function tool and if things are going sideways I'd like to have a rifle. This is drastically lighter than an AR carrying for miles and can double my ammo.
Also . I do keep more shelf stable food in the car that would be added to the bag if it had to get left behind. Same for what and other stuff I might need depend on area.ie( spare batteries for lights, headlamp, 3' crowbar, etc) this is not a bug out bag just based on what I have and would want. For me a bug out would be more.of a.last resort. Yes this bag is always in my trunk.. but to bug out I would not be leaving any guns at my place. Or ammo..j would be bringing much more food. Water. A huge Rubbermaid tote and duffel bag filled with medical supplies.plus everyones gear who's leaving with me..and vehicles in a convoy. Bugging out isn't a first options


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Gva wrote:
So I've been on here a while I figured I'd put my my first post up. Mods if this is in the wrong place please move it. Thanks.----



Enjoyed your post very much and appreciate the effort you took to share the pictures and explanations.

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teotwaki wrote:
Gva wrote:
So I've been on here a while I figured I'd put my my first post up. Mods if this is in the wrong place please move it. Thanks.----



Enjoyed your post very much and appreciate the effort you took to share the pictures and explanations.

Thank you. I've been prepping about 9 years regularly and about 14 years learning wilderness survival and such.


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Nice bag, good set up here are some low weight suggestions, If you like...
1. sewing kit: needles, thread, a selection of safety pins, maybe a spare fastex buckle or at least a couple of strap binders, cloth measuring tape, maybe an awl style needle. Tons of utility, less than an ounce.
2. Spare batteries. They go dead at the worst times. Do your lights all take the same type?
3. Radio. At least a tiny 'workout' style FM radio. Very low weight and lets you know what info others are getting. A ham radio is even better but the weight and expense starts to go up. Some of the small ham radios include AM and FM reception now too. Keep an eye on battery compatibility with your lights as mentioned in #2.
4. consider replacing the red dot with a 4x scope, or getting a small pair few binoculars or a monocular. Data gathering is always important, seeing what is going on far away is probably worth the weight.
5. Silk base layer; again very low weight for a great gain in warmth even when sleeping
6. The only pot I see is the canteen style cup. Can you do a brew up or cook rice with it? An aluminum port or kettle adds very little weight for increased versatility...especially since you are carrying rice.
7. Great idea with the maps, how about a photocopy of ID's or CHL?
8. You say you are not sure about the weight of a sleeping pad. What about a piece of pergo sub floor padding. They are thin blue foam with a heavy clear plastic backing. Very light weight but still is a barrier between you and anything cold or wet.

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2now wrote:
Nice bag, good set up here are some low weight suggestions, If you like...
1. sewing kit: needles, thread, a selection of safety pins, maybe a spare fastex buckle or at least a couple of strap binders, cloth measuring tape, maybe an awl style needle. Tons of utility, less than an ounce.
2. Spare batteries. They go dead at the worst times. Do your lights all take the same type?
3. Radio. At least a tiny 'workout' style FM radio. Very low weight and lets you know what info others are getting. A ham radio is even better but the weight and expense starts to go up. Some of the small ham radios include AM and FM reception now too. Keep an eye on battery compatibility with your lights as mentioned in #2.
4. consider replacing the red dot with a 4x scope, or getting a small pair few binoculars or a monocular. Data gathering is always important, seeing what is going on far away is probably worth the weight.
5. Silk base layer; again very low weight for a great gain in warmth even when sleeping
6. The only pot I see is the canteen style cup. Can you do a brew up or cook rice with it? An aluminum port or kettle adds very little weight for increased versatility...especially since you are carrying rice.
7. Great idea with the maps, how about a photocopy of ID's or CHL?
8. You say you are not sure about the weight of a sleeping pad. What about a piece of pergo sub floor padding. They are thin blue foam with a heavy clear plastic backing. Very light weight but still is a barrier between you and anything cold or wet.

Actually all great suggestions. This is fast and light but I have made some changes and added some things based on suggestions.My gear changes regularly as I see I do or don't use something.

I don't have spare clips for the bag yet but I have a sewing kit in a pill bottle wrapped in gorilla tape with various needles thread and super glue and some Velcro tabs and buttons. I'll post a pic soon.

I didn't post the spare batteries I keep backup batteries for all my EDC and other accessories in the car and at home. So always on me. I only use lithium because of power, weight savings and not effected by temp extremes. I keep at least one back up to each in the car AA and AAA. Most Everything is AAA. I probably should have mentioned that.

Radio actually is something I did have and couldn't find when I packed this up for my road trip about a year ago.. This actually made me realize I didn't have one. Not having information can put you in a world of hurt. I absolutely agree. Depending on the trip I'm taking and the amount of people I also have walkie talkies. And ham radio is something I'm looking into just out of the budget right now,

Another recent addition was actually bino. A smaller tasco set that works well for minimal weight but it's very true on data gathering abilities are a must. I think having the radio, binoculars, note book etc. To track changes in your environment as you travel is extremely under rated. Also binoculars have a a great advantage for travel as you can see without being seen. It's easier to get a feel for a situation without being noticed.

I have heard great things about silk but haven't been able to try it yet. I do use a sythentic thermal base layer. As well as Merino wool ski socks depending on season. I change what I carry. As the seasons warming up I'll be putting my ultralight tarp and hammock together.

The id and carry permits is a really good idea to keep. I actually had wanted to do that a while ago. I completely forgot about that. Thanks.

I do keep a ground pad in my car and the decision to carry it would be based on length of travel and the climate. But good thoughts on the pergo padding. I hadn't thought about using that. I have to check it out. That would work also for the hammock for some insulation. I do have a small cook pot with lid and will be upgrading to a kettle or larger lighter pot. I don't know how I missed this stuff in pictures. But I think what you have pointed out are all valid points and is a good reminder to check your gear and practice with it to see what you use and what you thought you needed but don't. Thanks for the reminders. I need to figure out where my radio is and put it in my bag and copy my IDs and permits as back up. Last thing I need in a disaster is to have a firearm and a lost liscence. , I might post the updated version of the bag soon. I constantly am adjusting my gear and EDC. I do not carry the 22 in the car regularly. That's more if I'm going more than a day walk from home it goes in the trunk. Same with additional ammo, layers of clothes, additional food, all really varies depending on environment and length of travel. I just doubles my water and added an additional tarp for sun shade and hydration during the summer. Also battery pack back ups for phones. I'm sure I'm still forgetting something I added or took away since October.


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Gva wrote:
So I've been on here a while I figured I'd put my my first post up. Mods if this is in the wrong place please move it. Thanks.

I built this bag as an cool weather faster moving ghb, this is mentioned to layer with my EDC bag. This we be last ditch having to leave the car or Jeep or stuck for a few days. . To say in advance the rifle doesn't stay in my trunk. That only gets thrown in for longer road trips. Both me and the girlfriend are liscenced to carry to we usually are carrying where legal. I originally posted this bag as an instructable.
This bag is meant to take a less tactical looking approach during a disaster while still being able to hunt and protect your self. With proper rationing and using your surroundings for water and small game this bag should be able to sustain one person needs for 5 days ish with some rationing of meals. . This bag and my EDC covers the needs of food, water, shelter, fire, navigation, and security.
Image
When I might need to leave my vehicle behind and walk home. And I need to not stand out but still able to have security, most areas walking down the street with a visible weapon might draw unwanted attention.

Image
First to start my EDC on body carry is a 150 lumen flashlight, a Kershaw blur folding knife, a Leatherman rebar multitool, a compact 9mm handgun in the waist band holster, spare magazine, a bandana, bic lighter, my lucky zippo,$20 in $5 and $1 minimum,2 pairs nitrile gloves, also Chapstick which is flammable and a great multiple use item from chapped lips to fire making. . a spare pocket holster for the handgun in the car.

WATER STORAGE AND PURIFICATION
Image

Having multiple ways to get water and treat it is probably the most important aspect of any survival situation wheather it's urban or wilderness environments. I have 2 nalgene bottles which I have found to be pretty much indestructible after years of use. I have one bottle wrapped in 15 feet of duct tape. The 2nd bottle is nested with with a gsi stainless canteen cup.

2- nalgene bottles (full)
1- sawyer mini water filter with straw
1- 1lt platypus water bladder for carrying extra water.
1- gsi canteen to boil water if needed
1- Folding stove with fuel to boil water and cook as needed.
1- bottle potable aqua tablets
(50 tablets)

When grabbing my bag from the trunk of my car I will top off the nalgene bottles and platypus bladder from a gallon jug and small water bottles before I leave the vehicle behind.
Having many options are able to use the folding stove that you can burn the fuel tablets to boil water, use potable aqua tablets to treat as you walk, mini filter to drink from puddles. or uses a squeeze filter system. Using maps of your area to follow water sources to your final destination is the best option. instead of searching and hoping for water. Exertion of carrying a pack and moving quickly will dehydrate you faster. Next pics of my snacks in the trunk, gallon of water, also photo copies of the map to navigate through areas not as familiar to you. Also find water sources and other possible supplies just Incase I also have a ground pad in the trunk. I will decide whether it's worth the weight for the walk,same thing with snacks.

Image
Image

FOOD... NEED CALORIES FOR FUEL
Image
For food I went with light weight and decent amount of calories and minimal cooking needed. Most everything can be ate on the move. I have also added coffee and tea for a caffeine boost.
1- MRE entree w/ heater
1- MRE brownie w/peanut butter packet
1- MRE cracker w/cheese spread packet
2- oatmeal packages
8- fruit bars
6- individual coffee packs
4- cream packs
4- lemon tea bags and honey packets
6- vegetable bouillon cubes at add flavor to bland meals or game.
2-spoons.
....forgot pictures of 4 retort tuna packs and 4 mayo packets, plastic forks(2). Small bag of par boiled rice as filler.

Also food can be added to my pockets from trunk of the car. Cookies, fruit bars and crackers from previous pictures with water jug .
folding stove and fuel mentioned above used for making tea, coffee, oatmeal.

If food begins to run low I can use the
.22 rifle with scope to hunt small game if needed. with 200 rounds of ammo

SHELTER/ WARMTH
Image
For shelter I have a given my self a layered lightweight approach
1-ultralight homemade silnylon 8x10" tarp with aluminum stakes
1-small 7*7 foot wool blanket
1- SOL space blanket
2-55 gallon heavy duty contactor bags.
With these materials I have coverage from wind and rain with the tarp. I pre strung the tarp with blaze orange paracord (I got sick of tripping over lines) I open the trash bag and put in the wool blanket then the space blanket inside of both for an improvised sleeping bag. All pieces are good at keeping you warm and dry.
Image
For additional layers I have
1- pair of merino wool ski socks. great when wet they still insulate great. I swear by these socks as many people I know. They're warm, don't intch like traditional wool. And don't get funky after being worn too long :D
1- ski hat/or Jeep cap... Always wearing a baseball hat
1- mechanix gloves.. hand protection
1- boots to put on when I leave the car.
1- insulated bandana fleece lined
1- regular bandana
1-boxers
1- safety glasses, eye protection.

[img].https://cdn.instructables.com/FVE/H2KJ/ ... MEDIUM.jpg[/img]]
This is most of my main pouch contents.

FIRST AID AND MEDICAL SUPPLY
Image
This first aid kit is usually in my EDC bag I carry. I have also upgraded the crappy tourniquet to a CAT Tourniquet. Added EMT shears.. Also have taken out the little bottle of vodka and added more gauze rolls. (2). Old pics so I'll update my EDC FAK soon.

To say risk of injury during a disaster and walking home is an understatement. Having a basic understanding of treating injuries as well as first aid kit. I have a basic kit for treating a deep puncture wounds as well as cuts blisters and sprains

2 quick clot sponges,
1- CAT tourniquet
4- gauze pads 4*4
1-Israeli style compression bandage.
1- neosporin tube
1- visine eye drops, helps with debris in the eyes or allergies
3- roll of 4"gauze
4- pairs nitrile gloves and 2-pairs on body EDC.
1- roll of paper tape
bag on right-
various bandages, bandaids, butterfly sutures, glacier gel blister pads.(awesome bandages for blisters and burns)
1- large pill fob. filled with amodium, Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Aleve, and benadryl, any Rx meds on body.
1- small hand sanitizer bottle.. also flammable liquid for fire starting.
1-large magic marker for marking treatments on someone and righting notes on map pages you took out of atlas

SECURITY/ HUNTING/ ZOMBIE PROTECTION

Please follow all your state and local laws when adding firearms/magazines/ammo/ knives as well as have safety training before handling any weapon. I am liscenced to carry in my state, which also allows me to carry a firearm during a state of emergency, your local laws may vary.

Image
Image
Image
Image

For travel with a rifle and ease of carrying much more ammo than a center fire rifle I choose a Ruger 10/22 take down rifle modified with a folding stock and pistol grip and red dot scope. I have 3- 25 round magazines loaded in the top of my pack as well as a 10 round magazine. Plus spare 15 rounds in the pistol grip handle.(magazines will be loaded once S has Hit the F til then til then ammo is in an ammo can in the trunk.)On the folding stock I have braided paracord as an extra back up of cordage. about 60 feet.
100-rounds of .22 for reloading magazines in pack (CCI mini mags)
25-rounds of 9mm hollow points (Speer gold dots)
25-.380 hollow points
4- magazines loaded with 85 rounds of .22 should be plenty of hunting and self-defense ammo on my way home. I don't plan on playing Rambo. i plan on avoiding any Confrontations whenever possible. I will only have the rifle assembled when crossing thru wooded terrain where I may run into small game or camped for the night. My 9mm will be accessible at all times as well as my girlfriend's..380.

It's important to look as low profile as possible in the early days of a longer term disaster. If the situation seems bad enough the stock can be folded in and the rifle can be carried some what discreetly. I wouldn't recommend it as walking around with a rifle may draw attention when you are trying to get home, but it is possible. I plan to travel out of the way to avoid larger crowds and people. A few hour drive could turn in to many days+ walking especially if people are rioting and situations have got worse. And travel has to be slow and deliberate.If cell service is still available apps like scanner.radio are great for hearing about activity and where to avoid.

Image

This is where the safety glasses and mechanix gloves come in. If you have ever been walking through the woods and had a twig fly back and hit you in the face you will see the benefits of clear glasses walking/running through the woods at night. One stick to the eye could stop you from progressing. Same principal with mechanix gloves is you can push through sticker bushes, catch falls, and be able to work your way through damaged building and over grown areas. For minimal weight and low price these are in all my packs and vehicles.
Same with bandanas multiple uses and can provide protection for your face.
Without your hands,feet, or eyes working properly survival will be much harder and take much more adaption, and really slow your movement down.

NAVIGATION,MAPS/ MORALE BOOSTS/. SANITATION/CORDAGE

Image

The small pouch in the first has the very basic will be attached to my belt when leaving my car, this
pouch stays in my EDC bag.

Image
1- fire steel w/pill fob filled with cotton balls and Vaseline,
the bottle of potable aqua
2-20 foot pieces of paracord
1- wet fire tinder cube
1- folded piece of foil.
1- button compass with clip
1- match container wrapped in duct tape, filled with matches, misc. hooks, sinkers, and 50 feet of fishing line.


Back pocket of backpack has
2 packs of folded TP. about a half roll+
Not shown is a small garden shovel...
also 2- S biners for attaching gear to your pack or drying socks/ boxers while walking.and a magic towel for cleaning the canteen cup and yourself as needed, I would wash between the two cleanings haha. :clap:

Image

Minimal space and weight can go a long way to keep you sane on a hike solo or with another person. Having a mini set of playing cards can occupy time while in a safer place and keep your spirits up. Also having tea and coffee can really boost morale. It helps give a sense of normalcy.

For navigation.. I have a giant Atlas that covers every street, highway, river, stream, park, hospital and police station in my state. Having a detailed atlas in your kit is a great addition to any car kit. I have copies of 100sq miles surrounding my house already copied that I can mark water, woods and planned route as I travel. if I am farther than 100 miles from home and have to abandon my car I can rip out the pages I need and head out. that's why it stays in my trunk.

Image

Having the additional food and water in the trunk allows me to help others who are with me. Same with having the carhartt style jacket for someone else who is wearing lighter clothes. With gear in the trunk, my ghb, and my EDC bag 2 people could be relatively comfortable while stuck or getting home.

-Not pictured
- headlamp with spare batteries for headlamp and flashlight
-.backup phone charger
-Cigarettes (don't smoke) good for information on the street. as well as carrying an ember to a fire. If you don't smoke I wouldn't carry them. I'm trying to quit again soon. :shock:

I know that this will inevitably be noticed that I don't have a fixed blade in my kit. For one reason I have 2 razor sharp blades on my Leatherman and my Kershaw will do most anything I need. If I was going to be out for a while I absolutely would be putting in a fixed blade. I don't plan on batoning wood while I'm getting home. I have done mock hikes and I can set up a semi comfortable shelter and have a fire with scavenged wood with any blade. I figured it will add weight that'll slow me down getting home. Also more weight is more likely to get hurt rolling an ankle or falling In my experience.
Oh and the bag is a Northface Terra 30. Nice lightweight and streamline, good stretch that keeps everything in place. Normal trips this would be a day or 2 summer bag. Getting home isn't about comfort it's more speed for me.

Image


I would like to get some input on what I forgot and what others would add or take away. Thanks everyone.


You can get color changing safety glasses by the way. Gives you a set of kind of crap sunnies for no extra room.

I have never really done a garden shovel. I shapren a stick.

For disinfectant. i carry iodine as it can probably purify water.

I dont use paper tape. I use gorilla tape. Because every tape holds a bangage together. Paper tape doesn't do much else. At the very least mabye strapping tape.

Another dirty trick is I carry some eucalyptus or menthol hard candies. Now they have just enough energy to stop you passing out. But they are also good if you have a sore throat.

I use wet wipes for cleaning myself and gear and they can be saved for toilet paper.

I use the black nitrile gloves you get at auto shops. They are a bit thicker.

I use thinner cord. Venetian blind cord will hold a tarp up.

I broke a spoon once. Now I spend the cash and use a titanium spork.

Put a spare vehicle key and mabye a house key with your cash somewhere in that bag. Break a 5 gram key somewhere mid trip. life is suck.

Waterproof your hat. You can buy sexy gortex caps. Or you can just buy spray.

At the very least I would carry an AM/FM radio. If there s a disaster you may want to know where and when it is occuring. Where t is safe to travel and other tuff like that. I had a little battery powered one for the last cyclone. it was left on for about 2 days straight and did not die.


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PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2017 8:31 pm 
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drop bear wrote:
Gva wrote:
So I've been on here a while I figured I'd put my my first post up. Mods if this is in the wrong place please move it. Thanks.

I built this bag as an cool weather faster moving ghb, this is mentioned to layer with my EDC bag. This we be last ditch having to leave the car or Jeep or stuck for a few days. . To say in advance the rifle doesn't stay in my trunk. That only gets thrown in for longer road trips. Both me and the girlfriend are liscenced to carry to we usually are carrying where legal. I originally posted this bag as an instructable.
This bag is meant to take a less tactical looking approach during a disaster while still being able to hunt and protect your self. With proper rationing and using your surroundings for water and small game this bag should be able to sustain one person needs for 5 days ish with some rationing of meals. . This bag and my EDC covers the needs of food, water, shelter, fire, navigation, and security.
Image
When I might need to leave my vehicle behind and walk home. And I need to not stand out but still able to have security, most areas walking down the street with a visible weapon might draw unwanted attention.

Image
First to start my EDC on body carry is a 150 lumen flashlight, a Kershaw blur folding knife, a Leatherman rebar multitool, a compact 9mm handgun in the waist band holster, spare magazine, a bandana, bic lighter, my lucky zippo,$20 in $5 and $1 minimum,2 pairs nitrile gloves, also Chapstick which is flammable and a great multiple use item from chapped lips to fire making. . a spare pocket holster for the handgun in the car.

WATER STORAGE AND PURIFICATION
Image

Having multiple ways to get water and treat it is probably the most important aspect of any survival situation wheather it's urban or wilderness environments. I have 2 nalgene bottles which I have found to be pretty much indestructible after years of use. I have one bottle wrapped in 15 feet of duct tape. The 2nd bottle is nested with with a gsi stainless canteen cup.

2- nalgene bottles (full)
1- sawyer mini water filter with straw
1- 1lt platypus water bladder for carrying extra water.
1- gsi canteen to boil water if needed
1- Folding stove with fuel to boil water and cook as needed.
1- bottle potable aqua tablets
(50 tablets)

When grabbing my bag from the trunk of my car I will top off the nalgene bottles and platypus bladder from a gallon jug and small water bottles before I leave the vehicle behind.
Having many options are able to use the folding stove that you can burn the fuel tablets to boil water, use potable aqua tablets to treat as you walk, mini filter to drink from puddles. or uses a squeeze filter system. Using maps of your area to follow water sources to your final destination is the best option. instead of searching and hoping for water. Exertion of carrying a pack and moving quickly will dehydrate you faster. Next pics of my snacks in the trunk, gallon of water, also photo copies of the map to navigate through areas not as familiar to you. Also find water sources and other possible supplies just Incase I also have a ground pad in the trunk. I will decide whether it's worth the weight for the walk,same thing with snacks.

Image
Image

FOOD... NEED CALORIES FOR FUEL
Image
For food I went with light weight and decent amount of calories and minimal cooking needed. Most everything can be ate on the move. I have also added coffee and tea for a caffeine boost.
1- MRE entree w/ heater
1- MRE brownie w/peanut butter packet
1- MRE cracker w/cheese spread packet
2- oatmeal packages
8- fruit bars
6- individual coffee packs
4- cream packs
4- lemon tea bags and honey packets
6- vegetable bouillon cubes at add flavor to bland meals or game.
2-spoons.
....forgot pictures of 4 retort tuna packs and 4 mayo packets, plastic forks(2). Small bag of par boiled rice as filler.

Also food can be added to my pockets from trunk of the car. Cookies, fruit bars and crackers from previous pictures with water jug .
folding stove and fuel mentioned above used for making tea, coffee, oatmeal.

If food begins to run low I can use the
.22 rifle with scope to hunt small game if needed. with 200 rounds of ammo

SHELTER/ WARMTH
Image
For shelter I have a given my self a layered lightweight approach
1-ultralight homemade silnylon 8x10" tarp with aluminum stakes
1-small 7*7 foot wool blanket
1- SOL space blanket
2-55 gallon heavy duty contactor bags.
With these materials I have coverage from wind and rain with the tarp. I pre strung the tarp with blaze orange paracord (I got sick of tripping over lines) I open the trash bag and put in the wool blanket then the space blanket inside of both for an improvised sleeping bag. All pieces are good at keeping you warm and dry.
Image
For additional layers I have
1- pair of merino wool ski socks. great when wet they still insulate great. I swear by these socks as many people I know. They're warm, don't intch like traditional wool. And don't get funky after being worn too long :D
1- ski hat/or Jeep cap... Always wearing a baseball hat
1- mechanix gloves.. hand protection
1- boots to put on when I leave the car.
1- insulated bandana fleece lined
1- regular bandana
1-boxers
1- safety glasses, eye protection.

[img].https://cdn.instructables.com/FVE/H2KJ/ ... MEDIUM.jpg[/img]]
This is most of my main pouch contents.

FIRST AID AND MEDICAL SUPPLY
Image
This first aid kit is usually in my EDC bag I carry. I have also upgraded the crappy tourniquet to a CAT Tourniquet. Added EMT shears.. Also have taken out the little bottle of vodka and added more gauze rolls. (2). Old pics so I'll update my EDC FAK soon.

To say risk of injury during a disaster and walking home is an understatement. Having a basic understanding of treating injuries as well as first aid kit. I have a basic kit for treating a deep puncture wounds as well as cuts blisters and sprains

2 quick clot sponges,
1- CAT tourniquet
4- gauze pads 4*4
1-Israeli style compression bandage.
1- neosporin tube
1- visine eye drops, helps with debris in the eyes or allergies
3- roll of 4"gauze
4- pairs nitrile gloves and 2-pairs on body EDC.
1- roll of paper tape
bag on right-
various bandages, bandaids, butterfly sutures, glacier gel blister pads.(awesome bandages for blisters and burns)
1- large pill fob. filled with amodium, Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Aleve, and benadryl, any Rx meds on body.
1- small hand sanitizer bottle.. also flammable liquid for fire starting.
1-large magic marker for marking treatments on someone and righting notes on map pages you took out of atlas

SECURITY/ HUNTING/ ZOMBIE PROTECTION

Please follow all your state and local laws when adding firearms/magazines/ammo/ knives as well as have safety training before handling any weapon. I am liscenced to carry in my state, which also allows me to carry a firearm during a state of emergency, your local laws may vary.

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For travel with a rifle and ease of carrying much more ammo than a center fire rifle I choose a Ruger 10/22 take down rifle modified with a folding stock and pistol grip and red dot scope. I have 3- 25 round magazines loaded in the top of my pack as well as a 10 round magazine. Plus spare 15 rounds in the pistol grip handle.(magazines will be loaded once S has Hit the F til then til then ammo is in an ammo can in the trunk.)On the folding stock I have braided paracord as an extra back up of cordage. about 60 feet.
100-rounds of .22 for reloading magazines in pack (CCI mini mags)
25-rounds of 9mm hollow points (Speer gold dots)
25-.380 hollow points
4- magazines loaded with 85 rounds of .22 should be plenty of hunting and self-defense ammo on my way home. I don't plan on playing Rambo. i plan on avoiding any Confrontations whenever possible. I will only have the rifle assembled when crossing thru wooded terrain where I may run into small game or camped for the night. My 9mm will be accessible at all times as well as my girlfriend's..380.

It's important to look as low profile as possible in the early days of a longer term disaster. If the situation seems bad enough the stock can be folded in and the rifle can be carried some what discreetly. I wouldn't recommend it as walking around with a rifle may draw attention when you are trying to get home, but it is possible. I plan to travel out of the way to avoid larger crowds and people. A few hour drive could turn in to many days+ walking especially if people are rioting and situations have got worse. And travel has to be slow and deliberate.If cell service is still available apps like scanner.radio are great for hearing about activity and where to avoid.

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This is where the safety glasses and mechanix gloves come in. If you have ever been walking through the woods and had a twig fly back and hit you in the face you will see the benefits of clear glasses walking/running through the woods at night. One stick to the eye could stop you from progressing. Same principal with mechanix gloves is you can push through sticker bushes, catch falls, and be able to work your way through damaged building and over grown areas. For minimal weight and low price these are in all my packs and vehicles.
Same with bandanas multiple uses and can provide protection for your face.
Without your hands,feet, or eyes working properly survival will be much harder and take much more adaption, and really slow your movement down.

NAVIGATION,MAPS/ MORALE BOOSTS/. SANITATION/CORDAGE

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The small pouch in the first has the very basic will be attached to my belt when leaving my car, this
pouch stays in my EDC bag.

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1- fire steel w/pill fob filled with cotton balls and Vaseline,
the bottle of potable aqua
2-20 foot pieces of paracord
1- wet fire tinder cube
1- folded piece of foil.
1- button compass with clip
1- match container wrapped in duct tape, filled with matches, misc. hooks, sinkers, and 50 feet of fishing line.


Back pocket of backpack has
2 packs of folded TP. about a half roll+
Not shown is a small garden shovel...
also 2- S biners for attaching gear to your pack or drying socks/ boxers while walking.and a magic towel for cleaning the canteen cup and yourself as needed, I would wash between the two cleanings haha. :clap:

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Minimal space and weight can go a long way to keep you sane on a hike solo or with another person. Having a mini set of playing cards can occupy time while in a safer place and keep your spirits up. Also having tea and coffee can really boost morale. It helps give a sense of normalcy.

For navigation.. I have a giant Atlas that covers every street, highway, river, stream, park, hospital and police station in my state. Having a detailed atlas in your kit is a great addition to any car kit. I have copies of 100sq miles surrounding my house already copied that I can mark water, woods and planned route as I travel. if I am farther than 100 miles from home and have to abandon my car I can rip out the pages I need and head out. that's why it stays in my trunk.

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Having the additional food and water in the trunk allows me to help others who are with me. Same with having the carhartt style jacket for someone else who is wearing lighter clothes. With gear in the trunk, my ghb, and my EDC bag 2 people could be relatively comfortable while stuck or getting home.

-Not pictured
- headlamp with spare batteries for headlamp and flashlight
-.backup phone charger
-Cigarettes (don't smoke) good for information on the street. as well as carrying an ember to a fire. If you don't smoke I wouldn't carry them. I'm trying to quit again soon. :shock:

I know that this will inevitably be noticed that I don't have a fixed blade in my kit. For one reason I have 2 razor sharp blades on my Leatherman and my Kershaw will do most anything I need. If I was going to be out for a while I absolutely would be putting in a fixed blade. I don't plan on batoning wood while I'm getting home. I have done mock hikes and I can set up a semi comfortable shelter and have a fire with scavenged wood with any blade. I figured it will add weight that'll slow me down getting home. Also more weight is more likely to get hurt rolling an ankle or falling In my experience.
Oh and the bag is a Northface Terra 30. Nice lightweight and streamline, good stretch that keeps everything in place. Normal trips this would be a day or 2 summer bag. Getting home isn't about comfort it's more speed for me.

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I would like to get some input on what I forgot and what others would add or take away. Thanks everyone.


You can get color changing safety glasses by the way. Gives you a set of kind of crap sunnies for no extra room.

I have never reall done a garden shovel. I shapren a stick.

For disinfectant. i carry iodine as it can probably purify water.

I dont use paper tape. I use gorilla tape. Because every tape holds a bangage together. Paper tape doesn't do much else. At the very least mabye strapping tape.

Another dirty trick is I carry some eucalyptus or menthol hard candies. Now they have just enough energy to stop you passing out. But they are also good if you have a sore throat.

I use wet wipes for cleaning myself and gear and they can be saved for toilet paper.

I use the black nitrile gloves you get at auto shops. They are a bit thicker.

I use thinner cord. Venetian blind cord will hold a tarp up.

Yeah I do have iodine I should add that to my bad. Small dropper would be good. Also vitamin รง tablets to cut the taste down.
I uses fishing glasses as my edc. The clear are for bushwacking in a hurry. Lol. It's helped blazing a trail at night before. Good call on the glasses.
Gorilla tape is awesome. I love that stuff. I use paper tape because of allergic reactions people have to some tapes and gorilla tape could actually cause more trauma to a wound. Last ditch option I'll use anything. But paper is minimal weight and can be written on for treatments of a trauma victim.
I actually use tiger balm and it works well for injuries/sprains and helps with headaches too. I need to look into the cough drops. I also do want to get some kelvar cord. I've just used Paracord because I have a punch and I've tested it on a tarp during super storm Sandy and we broke a heavy duty plastic zip tie aka flex cuff but no issues with a trap blowing in the wind with the paracord.
I have to check out the blinds cord. That's pretty sturdy material, I just would think it has less versatility than Paracord. I like even Paracord boot laces because i still have functional laces even after removing the inner strands. For attaching a tarp in lower winds a piece or 2 of paracord inner strand will work well.
On the note of nitrile gloves I prefer like a 5-7 mil for dexterity while working. I noticed thicker gloves make doing finer work more difficult. I do have black gloves in in latex but I don't carry because of allergic reactions again. Personally I don't care about color on my gloves. It's just PPE for me. As long as it works and keeps me separate from BB pathogens I'm fine. I also notice for myself thicker gloves actually have more issues with getting caught on things and tearing vs thinner gloves with more flex. I usually get my gloves from a medic friend. And recently I added a CAT tourniquet. And had a local LEO buddy whos worked in our police Special operations unit look over my kit as well and said he would add asprin for heart attacks and something to seal a chest wound. Which has been added. He said he's seen even a piece of plastic over a chest puncture will literally save a life. He's personally used even a grocery store bag to save a life.


Last edited by Gva on Mon May 29, 2017 2:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2017 10:16 pm 
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My wilderness first aid instructors said not to use duct tape if the patient is going directly to the hospital or if there was a need to regularly change bandages. They were both EMTs and preferred cloth tape

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PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2017 10:25 pm 
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teotwaki wrote:
My wilderness first aid instructors said not to use duct tape if the patient is going directly to the hospital or if there was a need to regularly change bandages. They were both EMTs and preferred cloth tape


2nd on that, as a bushwalker (hiker) and paramedic I carry duct tape and hypoallergenic tape (Leukofix). duct tape is used on gear, leukofix on people

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teotwaki wrote:
My wilderness first aid instructors said not to use duct tape if the patient is going directly to the hospital or if there was a need to regularly change bandages. They were both EMTs and preferred cloth tape

That's actually where I got my information from was an EMT buddy as well as a mountaineering guide who's recently finished a TCCC training. Duct tape will work in a pinch but would not be my first choice either


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