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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 12:58 pm 
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Hey guys,

I'm late to this party, so I'm sure this topic has been beat to death. If so, I'm very sorry. I was wondering if anyone has had any luck with home remedies for bleeding control? Working in the ER I've seen people swear that blue ink from a standard pen directly in the wound stops bleeding, coffee grounds, pure sugar, dirt, etc. Most people do these things because their mother or father used it on them as a child, and their parents learned it from their grandparents, etc etc. I'm wondering if any of these or others have been proven to work? You never know when you need quick clot and you don't have any immediately available. Of course I know the basics, direct pressure. I'm just curious if anyone has tried any alternatives with success. And if there are any other unusual remedies that you guys have witnessed, do tell!

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 1:16 pm 
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I heard flour works but I have not tried or know any body that tried any of these methods. I would not test them out in a live and death situation either.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 4:36 pm 
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I've heard dry coffee grounds for bleeding, and chilled egg whites for burn care. But never used either myself.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 7:03 pm 
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My anecdotal evidence:
A massive nosebleed after having a couple of aspirin some hours before that absolutely would not stop. A couple dozen soaked tissues later, sitting next to the toilet for fear of getting blood all over the house, and starting to feel worried about how much blood I'd lost: I'd tried pressure (because of the location of the bleed I couldn't get direct pressure easily), cold, and everything else I could think of. I finally decided to snort some corn starch from the kitchen, and it stopped right up immediately. I made my decision carefully thinking of which substances in the house had the greatest gelling effect, and settled on corn starch, just over flour. I assume the mechanism of action to be purely physical, by removing water from the blood and concentrating the clotting factors, as well as possibly giving them a greater surface area and rapidly-cross-linking substrate to adhere to. For that reason, I assume flour would have worked nearly as well.

Another one for the "I've heard, but haven't tried" pile is the plant Yarrow https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achillea_millefolium#Herbal_and_traditional_uses.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 8:17 pm 
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JayceSlayn wrote:

Another one for the "I've heard, but haven't tried" pile is the plant Yarrow https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achillea_millefolium#Herbal_and_traditional_uses.

Would be interested in anyone dwho knows about yarrrow. It grows crazy around here and I planted a bunch in my yard too... I just like the smell and make tea sometimes.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 8:17 pm 
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JayceSlayn wrote:
Another one for the "I've heard, but haven't tried" pile is the plant Yarrow https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achillea_millefolium#Herbal_and_traditional_uses.


Make sure you can accurately identify Yarrow. I can be mistaken for this...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conium_maculatum

Another old remedy for bleeding control is cobwebs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider_web#Uses_by_humans I don't know if you could use it for nosebleeds, though.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2016 6:30 am 
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Corpsman86 wrote:
Hey guys,

I'm late to this party, so I'm sure this topic has been beat to death. If so, I'm very sorry. I was wondering if anyone has had any luck with home remedies for bleeding control? Working in the ER I've seen people swear that blue ink from a standard pen directly in the wound stops bleeding, coffee grounds, pure sugar, dirt, etc. Most people do these things because their mother or father used it on them as a child, and their parents learned it from their grandparents, etc etc. I'm wondering if any of these or others have been proven to work? You never know when you need quick clot and you don't have any immediately available. Of course I know the basics, direct pressure. I'm just curious if anyone has tried any alternatives with success. And if there are any other unusual remedies that you guys have witnessed, do tell!


Sugar probably can't do much of anything for bleeding because it's so soluble in liquids, but it definitely has local antibacterial effectiveness: it kills bacteria through hyperosmotic shock, at least until it becomes dilute enough from body fluids to make an ideal breeding ground for additional bacteria.

Many absorbent powder such as cornstarch or flour should help stop bleeding. You do want to be careful about what you're introducing to a wound, however. Dirt is the worst idea possible, as it's laden with bacteria and not very absorbant anyway.

There's a product used on horses called Wonder Dust. It's probably not FDA-approved for use on humans... that being said, I have used it on myself for very minor lacerations that didn't want to stop bleeding right away. Its main component is charcoal, so it does create a very conspicuous black scab which makes it unsuitable for shaving cuts and the like (unless you don't care about your appearance...). In any case, the scab eventually sheds like any other.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2016 9:43 am 
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I hear (from those who shave) that Alum is good for stopping nicks and cuts from shaving. no reason is wouldn't work on other parts.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2016 3:52 pm 
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emclean wrote:
I hear (from those who shave) that Alum is good for stopping nicks and cuts from shaving. no reason is wouldn't work on other parts.


Yeah it works on shaving nicks but it burns like the dickens.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2016 4:09 pm 
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Sugar will work, but you have to use a ton of it. It is still used by vets for animals.

Marcus Luttrell said he packed dirt into his injuries during Operation Red Wings to stop bleeding, I sure as hell wouldn't want to do that unless I figured I was about to die of blood loss and I was going to be evac'ed to a first world medical center.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2016 1:54 pm 
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Great suggestions! I'll have to check into that wonder dust. I wonder if it's less expensive than the other commercial blood control products available.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2016 9:38 pm 
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Now I will stick with bandages and gauze if available but if not then these are somethings that would work in a pinch.
1. Corn starch, it is commonly used to thicken sauces and gravy but unlike flour it has no gluten (last I checked) if someone is allergic
2. Honey, it is anti macrobial and quite thick. IF you immerse something in honey and seal it no bacteria can grow due to a total absence of oxygen. Just ask any Egyptologyst. This also applies to peat but that is a little harder to come by.
3.The Japanesse used to use seaweed
4.The Chineese would use silk threads.
5. The Western way, a hot fire and an iron bar.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2016 9:52 pm 
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Another vote for corn starch. While I've never used it on a human, mom was a dog breeder at one and if nicked the "quick" of the nail which can produce quite a bit of blood, corn starch was the solution (and apologizing like hell to the poor animal).


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 9:52 am 
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Quote:
There's a product used on horses called Wonder Dust. It's probably not FDA-approved for use on humans... that being said, I have used it on myself for very minor lacerations that didn't want to stop bleeding right away. Its main component is charcoal, so it does create a very conspicuous black scab which makes it unsuitable for shaving cuts and the like (unless you don't care about your appearance...). In any case, the scab eventually sheds like any other.


Actually Wonder Dust is made from:

Quote:
Iodoform 2.0% (disinfectant)
Potassium Alum 5.0% (astringent/styptic and antiseptic)
Flowers of Sulfur 2.0% (disinfectant)
Tannic Acid 2.0% (Hemostatic Agent, disinfectant)
Activated Charcoal 5.0% (filtering and clarifying agent)
Copper Sulfate 13.0% (molluscicide, as well as various other pests)
Hydrated Lime 71.0% (filtering and clarifying agent)


Most of the above are not approved for use on humans. Several (Lime, Sulfur, tannic acid) can cause burns as described. Some were in use in medicine in years past but are no longer in use being replaced by more effective and less dangerous medications. I'd be leery of putting any on my wounds.

Another common vet treatment is Kwik Stop Styptic Powder:
Quote:
Ferric Subsulfate (Hemostatic Agent)
Aluminum Chloride (desiccant, also closes pores)
Diatomite (insecticide)
Bentonite (desiccant, also being studied as a combat wound dressing)
Copper Sulfate
Ammonium Chloride (acidifying agent)
Benzocaine (anesthetic)


Ferric Subsulfate and Aluminum Chloride and the rest are approved for use on humans but not in vet medicine form. Some are by prescription. I am not going to go in to why taking prescription medications without a prescription is stupid or why dumping animal treatments on your body is a dumb.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 4:51 pm 
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Actually it may be dumb, but we do it. I have visited a vet or two overseas to grab meds. In central, East and West Africa. Not only that, there are Arabic versions of TXA and French versions and I have used both. I have them here in my bag. If I knew how to post pictures, I would. Maybe I can send them to someone? We also use Hunnan Pyayo (sp). I posted about it in the past. The Viet Cong used it and it works. I use it on animals and humans and to answer your next question, yes, I just finished my radiology for my degree in Vet Medicine.....(thank God, that was hard)


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:23 am 
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Living in the more rural parts of the US and working in EMS I've seen some amazing home "remedies". Some of them even worked.

Sweet little old lady with a nasty laceration on her forearm and direct pressure had slowed but not stopped the bleed. She keeps smiling at the fire guys as they keep bandaging her. "I've always been slow to stop bleeding, watch this!" and poured black pepper on the wound. Bleeding stopped. She reported no pain. The attending said it made the blood into one big clotted lump that looked like a piece of liver and the dark color of the pepper helped identify the gross contamination during irrigation and closure. I would stop short of recommending this (properly applied direct pressure stops most bleeding and is the 'gold standard' of care) but I do know that I saw it work before.

Usnea, old mans beard, is a plant that we discuss in our Wild Crafter and Wild Edible classes. Here's my business partner Jason, founder of Colorado Mountain Man Survival, discussing this plant.




Personally I've applied usnea to bleeds that I call "lingering", not a life threatening bleed, but just a laceration or abrasion that won't stop oozing or flowing blood. Apply usnea, pressure dressing, allow to sit. Is it the usnea in and of itself that does the hemostasis or just properly applied pressure? Hard to really say.


Plantain (the small plant growing from a rosette, not the little banana) has a strong history of use for healing if not necessarily hemostasis. Coming from "real" medical back ground (opposed to "alternative" medicine..) I have a high degree of suspicion about most herbal remedies. Plantain, however, is very very effective, especially with small burns and insect bites.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 1:52 pm 
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It sure looks like there's a general principle at play here. Absorbing the water component of the blood concentrates the clotting factors, which speeds clotting, compared to absorbing all the blood as a bandage would do. <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4869418/> Obviously, infection control is still important, so you want something clean and relatively devoid of bacterial spores -- I'd suggest avoiding soil unless all other options are unavailable.

For quick, clean, cheap whole blood absorption, I've been told to consider feminine sanitary products. They generally aren't sterilized, but it's definitely a few notches up from wrapping a shirt around a wound, and nearly as available.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:17 pm 
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Corpsman86 wrote:
Hey guys,

I'm late to this party, so I'm sure this topic has been beat to death. If so, I'm very sorry. I was wondering if anyone has had any luck with home remedies for bleeding control? Working in the ER I've seen people swear that blue ink from a standard pen directly in the wound stops bleeding, coffee grounds, pure sugar, dirt, etc. Most people do these things because their mother or father used it on them as a child, and their parents learned it from their grandparents, etc etc. I'm wondering if any of these or others have been proven to work? You never know when you need quick clot and you don't have any immediately available. Of course I know the basics, direct pressure. I'm just curious if anyone has tried any alternatives with success. And if there are any other unusual remedies that you guys have witnessed, do tell!

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 10:04 pm 
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Another vote here for Alum Block. I've been using one for years.

Image

Wet the area and run the block over it. It stings a little, but no worse than the original cut. At $8.00, it's cheap, and a block lasts forever. Just make sure you dry it thoroughly after each use and keep it in a case.

More serious cuts get New Skin.

Image

It can be a little pricier, but it seals the wound much longer, and can peel off after it heals.

Maybe not "home remedies," per se...but I have them both in my home.


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