It is currently Sat Dec 16, 2017 9:31 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 3:13 pm 
Offline
* * * *
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 3:48 pm
Posts: 818
Location: Northern California
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 53 times
Stumasters wrote:
In my case, I'm nursing what feels like a bout of pneumonia, something I experienced a few years ago for the first time, and it's pretty clear what I need.


It sounds like what you need is the Pneumovax 23 pneumonia vaccine. Just sayin'. We got ours 10 years ago, my wife got her re-up this past year and I'm due. Ounce of prevention beats a pound of cure.


Quote:
Antibiotics have been a particular favorite for preppers for some time, due to the unknown and the fact that if SHTF there may be no doctors or pharmacies open to distribute needed drugs to the masses.

I've also read that many people are choosing aquatic type antibiotics because in many cases they are run on the same line next to human consumable versions and are simply labeled differently, any truth to that? I suppose if one could trace the physical pill to a manufacturer it could play out in our favor. I still maintain that if it says not for humans, I'm probably not going to try it.

I am primarily interested in stocking Azithromycin which is probably one of the most common for bacterial infections, something we just seem to contract most frequently. I would like it not only in pill format for the adults, but a suspension powder for the children if ever needed.


There is no "one size fits all" antibiotic. I think there's a widespread misunderstanding about the only difference between antibiotics being their strength. Each antibiotic is particularly effective against certain types of bacteria. Before administering an antibiotic it is important to know or have a very well-educated guess about what type of bacteria is being addressed. The reason is that if you administer the wrong antibiotic, not only is it ineffective, but you potentially kill off other strains of bacteria (essentially, the "bad" bacteria's competition) and leave the field wide open for the baddies to take completely over. That's basically like pouring gas on a fire.

There are 7 basic antibiotics that one can get by with... these address - you guessed it - 7 different kinds of bacteria. If you know what you are doing and understand the trade-offs, you can get the list down to 5 in a pinch. If you are just trying to treat everything with two types of bacteria by randomly guessing what you are trying to fix, there's a 50-50 odds chance that you will make the infection worse, not better. Maybe greater odds than that, even.

If you are going to keep antibiotics in your preps you should have books and whatever diagnostic tools necessary to identify the infection before starting treatment. Doctors frequently "guess" but their guess is informed by 8 years of higher education and years of experience in the field, plus they have everything at their disposal needed to handle the situation (such as a hospital full of the latest medical technology) to cover them if they guess wrong. The prepper does not have this luxury.

Antibiotics are all made in the same facilities on the same line. Out of one big mixing vat the pills go down the same exact assembly line. One gets labeled for human use, the other for veterinary - not only is there no qualitative difference, but they are literally the same exact medication off the same assembly line, just a different label. The only difference is the label on the bottle.

Quote:
This is something that would have to be refreshed every 2 years or so due to it's expiration, but it would just be another item on the list of things to replace.

Any thoughts or suggestions welcome.


Expiration dates on medication are bogus provided the medication is kept in a cool dark place. This is not opinion, it's a verified fact. The reasons they have expiration dates is not because the medications go "bad" (though in extended storage they may gradually decline in potency, requiring larger doses for effectiveness) but because the documentation that comes with them is occasionally updated (recommendations for use, cautions, interactions etc). If your antibiotics are put away in sealed containers in a cool, climate-controlled and dimly lit or dark area, they should be good for a decade (likely more).


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 10:18 am 
Offline
* *
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2011 4:48 pm
Posts: 138
Has thanked: 21 times
Been thanked: 22 times
Neville wrote:
Expiration dates on medication are bogus provided the medication is kept in a cool dark place. This is not opinion, it's a verified fact. The reasons they have expiration dates is not because the medications go "bad" (though in extended storage they may gradually decline in potency, requiring larger doses for effectiveness) but because the documentation that comes with them is occasionally updated (recommendations for use, cautions, interactions etc). If your antibiotics are put away in sealed containers in a cool, climate-controlled and dimly lit or dark area, they should be good for a decade (likely more).


I believe that is true except for tetracycline antibiotics, right? While most just lose some potency, tetracycline antibiotics actually get toxic?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 10:33 am 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3755
Has thanked: 1548 times
Been thanked: 469 times
good article here: http://thesurvivaldoctor.com/2015/08/05 ... tibiotics/

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:46 pm 
Offline
* * * *
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 3:48 pm
Posts: 818
Location: Northern California
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 53 times
norcalprep wrote:
Neville wrote:
Expiration dates on medication are bogus provided the medication is kept in a cool dark place. This is not opinion, it's a verified fact. The reasons they have expiration dates is not because the medications go "bad" (though in extended storage they may gradually decline in potency, requiring larger doses for effectiveness) but because the documentation that comes with them is occasionally updated (recommendations for use, cautions, interactions etc). If your antibiotics are put away in sealed containers in a cool, climate-controlled and dimly lit or dark area, they should be good for a decade (likely more).


I believe that is true except for tetracycline antibiotics, right? While most just lose some potency, tetracycline antibiotics actually get toxic?



There is one report of Tetracycline toxicity. It is from the early 1960's. The info is scant and hard to find but I tracked it down once, a few years ago. If I am recalling correctly the active agent in the toxicity was not the tetracycline itself but rather a binding agent that is no longer in use, so this should be a moot point unless someone's talking about antibiotics left over from the 60's. Shagadelic, Baby.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group