It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 10:28 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 94 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 11:40 am 
Offline
* *

Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 2:33 pm
Posts: 280
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 5 times
More good info! For the 100w version I use a dipped silver mica capacitor 500v rating with a value anywhere from 100pf to 150pf works fine. You can find the caps on Ebay cheap. For a 400w peak SSB version use a single FT-240-43 core and for up to about 800w SSB use two stacked FT-240-43 cores. For the higher power units I use a 3kV rated ceramic disc cap.
Radio Guy

teotwaki wrote:
I have built the 64:1 transformer in those links and they work great. When winding one pay careful attention to how the winding goes from one side to the other on the core. From the links:

Image

"Use 1mm enameled wire. Twist a length of about 6 – 8 inch of wire with a length of 40 inch of wire. It is good practice to tape the FT-240-43 core with (e.g. PVC or Teflon) isolation (tape). Start winding (back) at point B. This is the point where the bifilar winding ends. Make two windings back. Solder the beginning of the two bifilar windings together. Later, this will be connected to the ground of the SO393 female jack (or BNC if you like). The end of the bifilar winding will be the “hot” input; the center of the female jack chassis. Cut excess wire, leave about 1½ inch for soldering. Now from point B (where you started winding back) continue winding the single (long) wire forward and make 7 single windings. Then let the wire go THROUGH the core to the other side and make 7 more normal windings. Cut excess wire (leave 1½ extra for soldering). This end will be the feed point of the wire."

Image

Image


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2016 4:42 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
Hit the park with my PFR-3 and -9200, in spite of my broken toes.

The initial ant for the PFR-3 was a dud - my bad. I finally went with a 42 foot long wire and the built-in tuner will work on all three bands. Very quiet RX - eerily quite. The CW just seems to jump out of the earbuds.

The -9200 and SOTA is happy with the 34 foot wire I used in Texas. I can use the 34 foot ant with the PFR-3 -- IF I add a 17 foot counterpoise. Good on all three bands at that point.

I would add the tuner on the PFR-3 has quite the learning curve. Once you get everything sorted out, it is as quick to use as the 9200.

ALERT -
New outfit on the web selling goodies - The QRP Guys. Their Z match tuner is a ringer for the SOTA tuner - for $15.00 now $25 vs $40 for the one I have. No case though. (http://www.qrpguys.com)

I've got a HW-7 inbound Going to add a cw filer, audio amp board and maybe a BLT tuner. Should be something fun to mess with this summer. Quite the blast from the past (First offered in 1972, it has a crystal socket on the front panel - it was aimed at the now depreciated Novice class license holder)
I'll start a separate thread if there is any interest here on the board.

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Last edited by TacAir on Mon Apr 11, 2016 5:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2016 4:54 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3736
Has thanked: 1540 times
Been thanked: 465 times
Price must have just jumped. Currently at $25. Thanks for the lead!

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2016 5:11 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
teotwaki wrote:
Price must have just jumped. Currently at $25. Thanks for the lead!


It was $15 on Friday - should have bought a couple then - or just buy the parts and build another ugly style....

Thanks for the heads up.

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2016 12:37 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
There are radios and there are radios..... Please bear with me on this - it can get a bit convoluted....

Steve Weber is a well know designer of QRP radios, with his ATS series the most sought after by folks who want a good radio that is:
ultra-compact
puts out decent power and
is miserly on batteries. It is also hard, nearly impossible, to obtain one of the kits.

The commercial version of the ATS 3 is the Mountain Topper. It can be had from LNR Precision with some patience. The LNR 3 band version (shown below) most like the ATS 3 and sells for $259. These are sold in 'lots' as this is a low production rate company. The newer 5 band version sells for $379, with patience...it is currently sold out. This is the series that led off this thread.

Image
See http://www.lnrprecision.com/store/ for more details of what is currently offered.

A more easily obtained rig is Steve's PFR-3 - Portable Field Radio Ver 3 - now in the upgraded B model.
Image
Required image of radio.

This newest version features a rotary encoder instead of the little push buttons seen on the Mt. Topper. Cost - $285. This is a kit, but all of the SMD devices are already in place. You will need to wind several coils. If this is off-putting, a fellow on-line sells pre-wound coils for a very good price.

Still another is the Tri-bander - again from Qrpkits.com. a kit and...also sold out.
Image

Are you seeing a pattern here? Steve makes very good radios and they are all but impossible to find used or from a vendor. With patience, you can purchase one or, more likely, buy and build a kit.

So, by now you are asking: "What does all of this have to do with any thing?"

Glad you asked - I have recently purchased a used PFR-3 and decided to compare it to my MFJ-9200 rig.

Image

The biggest differences between the two is that the PFR-3 boasts both space for an internal battery and tuner. Good stuff that, less wires to deal with.
The PFR-3 weighs quite a bit more - 1 pound, 10 oz with 8 each NiMH cells installed - without the batteries, it comes in at 1 lb, 2 oz.

The 9200 sans batteries is 12 oz or with a band module installed, 12.4 oz. Battery weight is a wash as both need power to work. So - 6 oz advantage to the -9200, yes?
Not quite, the PFR-3 has a built-in tuner, so for the -9200 we need to add the SOTA tuner at 2.7 oz and the difference becomes much smaller - just 3.3 oz. Trivial.

The PFR-3 is physically larger (about 30%) and both radios have stuff that sticks out - knobs, switches and such. As a side note, the Mt Topper series has very little protruding, but I have seen reports of damage to the switches when care is not exercised.

Both the -9200 and PFR-3 can put out 5 watts and operate on more than one ham band. The PFR-3 has 40/30/20 Meters and the -9200 has 6 bands (80-15) - but you have to crack the 9200 case and swap modules to change bands. I usually only carry the 20 and 30 modules, leaving the 40 meter module in the rig while stored.

After some experimenting, antennas are a wash, both will work just fine on a 42 foot wire and a counterpoise.

The real difference in the rigs in in the circuits - the PFR-3 has a tune-able front end and a much tighter audio filter - it really is CW only.

The -9200 has a switchable audio allowing reception of the SW BCB bands, the PFR-3 cannot as it is CW only and Ham band (for the CW portion) only.

So - is there a winner? You have to decide, really - only you can decide.

The -9200 sells for $229 ready to go on 6 bands, the rest of these radios are higher cost kits or a long wait time to delivery, at a higher cost or both.

-- If you build the kit, you are already set for tools, tech data and know what parts are inside and can have a few spares for when the rig needs repair. If you view yourself as a prepper, then the ability to fix your own gear is likely high on your list of "must haves".... Any of these kits may be the better pick for you.

The PFR-3 and it's siblings offer 'better' technical specs - but unless you are in an RF dense environment, you may not hear the difference.

The deal maker for me was that the -9200 can copy SSB, allowing me to listen and check into SSB nets - yes, most nets will take CW traffic. CW is also much more power efficient - far better than SSB. The bonus is being able to listen to Shortwave stations.

Any of these would make a fine ham radio set for portable (car camping) operation.

For backpacking the MT Topper or ATS series are hard to beat. The middle ground for me is the -9200 - it offers more of what I want for just a tad more weight.

Why the PFR-3? When I travel the L-48 this summer, I'm taking it along, I know I'll be in a noisy environment.

I have a vintage Heathkit HW-7 inbound. When I get that up to speed, I post something on the rig.

Thanks for reading along.

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Last edited by TacAir on Sat Apr 23, 2016 12:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2016 12:48 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3736
Has thanked: 1540 times
Been thanked: 465 times
Thanks for all of the radio porn! A great read on a Sunday morning :mrgreen:

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2016 10:56 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
Image

Homemade sideswiper key. Who says ham radio has to cost a lot of dough?

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2016 12:13 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
This summer I was able to attend a sorta local hamfest - specifically looking for a HB-1B. I was lucky enough to find one that lit up, put out 5+ watts and looked to be fully operational. I was able - with a bit of jawboning - to walk out of the building with it for $100. This also included the wall wart battery charger.

So, what did I really get?

Image

My new radio is a HB-1B MK II late model (HB-1B8b) Note the port to charge the internal battery.

Let me chat about this for a bit - The Chinese HB series (for Home Brew) was originally envisioned as a low cost kit to compete against the KX-1.
No, is isn't a direct copy, and since form follows function, you could make the same claim about the KX-1 - it 'copies' earlier work. Looking at the series -

(BTW, all of the versioning is my own invention to make it a bit easier to track the changes seen in the rigs)

The HB-1A (not the kit version, as it was never offered in North America) was two band, but an owner could modify the radio via a simple jumper to gain 30M. (40/30/20) There was real issues (as in not meeting FCC mandated levels) with special purity on 30M, which is why TT sold the 20/40 and 30/40 as dual band radios. As you read the on-line reviews, all of these (HB-1A and the TT rigs) suffered badly from "Quality issues"
Image
Image

The HB-1B MK0 mod 0 was a 4-band radio 80/40/30/20 - with no battery charge port. It may not show the build date on the splash screen on power-up. RX 3.2 -16 Mhz.

I believe there is/could be a variant that could be called an HB-1B Mk1 mod 0 No build date on on power up. RX 3.2-16 Mhz

HB-1B Mk II mod 0 - 4 bands, 80/40/30/20 and comes with battery as an option but no power port build date displays on power up. RX 3.5-16 Mhz. Battery is removed to charge.
Image

HB-1B Mk II Mod 1 80/40/30/20 and comes with LiPO battery, no battery charge port RX 3.2-16 Mhz (early)

HB-1B MK II Mod 2, 4 band, 80/40/30/20, has power port RX 3.2 to 16 Mhz (late) Reported issues with 6 Mhz blow-by on SWB? (This what I have, picked up used.) As noted, has a battery charge port.
Image

HB-1B Mk II Mod 3, 4 band, 40/30/20/15 has power port RX 5 - 22 Mhz. Reported issues with 6 Mhz blow-by on SWB? Has a battery charge port.

HB-1B Mk III - current offering w./SWR metering.

Mine is (as defined above) a HB-1B MkII Mod 2. I've had no issues on the reported 6 Mhz blow-by as there are no high power stations anywhere near Ak running on 6 Mhz - like Radio Havana....

So, is it well built?

Image

Actually, it is a much better build than the MFJ-9200 that I so enjoy. Little to no hand soldering as seen on the -9200. The encoder is just as flaky, so some care is order. The HB-1B series is slightly larger than the -9200 and uses more current on RX - over double, in fact.
The bandwidth on the HB-1B is variable, unlike the -9200, which is fixed (CW or SSB) and as the filter is tightened up on the -1B, the audio drops off noticeably.

Otherwise, power out and receiver sensitivity/selectivity are a wash. I no longer have access to a spectrum analyzer, but I've not seen any reports (QST, QRZ or any of the other usual outlets) report issues with the radio not meeting FCC spectral purity standards.

On the air use gets no reports of clicks or other artifacts that may be found in digital radios. When I first lit this up - into a dummy load, I ran a second radio to listen for out of band spurs, etc. It sounded clean as well.

Is this better than a MFJ-9200? Yes and no.

The installed battery and continuous tune is a bit more convenient, and I can use an external 12VDC (up to 14.8VDC actually) source to save the internal battery for when the other (possibly solar) power source is unavailable. The radio pulls more current on both TX and RX. It is stable enough to copy PSK-31 and other digital modes - as is the -9200. SSB and AM copy of SW stations is no issue - ditto for the -9200. You cannot disable the backlight on the -1B as is possible for reduced current draw on the -9200

The -9200 is slightly smaller, weighs less, uses less current and runs only from an external battery pack as no internal battery is offered by MFJ. Changing bands is a bit of a PITA, but normally, not a big deal. If you count in the space taken by another couple of band modules, space saving is lost. The MFJ is a true 6 band radio - 80 to 15 Meters.

Bottom line -
For the $100 spent, I think I did well. Would I pay the full fare for a new HB-1B - NO.
No technical documentation, flaky warranty and reports of high "infant mortality" has made me take a pass until now.
I bought a used and working radio for less than 1/2 the cost of a new MFJ-9200. With internal battery and charger. I 've marked this for use in my VW Eurovan camper as the bus has a house battery and multiple 12VDC outlets.

If I'm walking, the -9200 get the nod.

Hope this was informative.

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2016 11:47 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
I often get emails asking about the MFJ-9200 and the HB-1B series radios, given that my repir manual is the only thing out on the web.

Had a ham ask about his new (2016) HB-1B MkIII. As part of the conversation, he was kind enough to send my images of the interior of the radio. Quite a shock for me - the MK III looks to be a completely redesigned rig - I'll post some pics and mote the obvious changes.

Image
Baseline image - this is a HB-1B MKII late model. (HB-1B8b)

Image
Back of the 2016 HB-1B MK III
note the filter board on the left - unless this was located on the front of the older radios, this is a new filter set.

Image
Closeup of markings. Note that this is markedly different than earlier series
NHB-1B5/2015. The date mark is new to me as is the leading "N" maybe stands for "New"?

Image
Compare this to the early HB-1B - this new setup mirrors the PA section of the MFJ-9200, right down to the PA transistor a 2SB2078.

My older HB-1B rig uses a 2SB1162. My MFJ-9200 uses a 2SC2078....surprise! As I have noted before, the build is high quality in terms of solder and wiring. Clearly You Kits is learning the Quality game. Now, if they can just put out some documents - even if they only ship with the radios.....

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:06 am 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:16 am
Posts: 1081
Location: Western Slope, Colorado
Has thanked: 17 times
Been thanked: 27 times
I don't know if this is only for CW QRP but, I have the Yaesu ft-857 for my main rig at home, but I just got the Xiegu X108G Outdoor version which is about a mid range priced QRP radio. It has the benefit of going up to 20 W when plugged in to a 13.8 v power source and up to 15 W for 12 v battery operation. I like it. It doesn't have all the filters that my Yaesu has but it still does a pretty good job with SSB. I have yet to try CW or data. It has all the ports that the Yaesu has so I can interchange accessories. The owners manual is minimal at best but There is enough out there right now to support it on the web. It is very light at almost 2 lbs. Battery draw is minimal but yet untested.

I made my first contact on 20 m from Colorado to Pennsylvania on 20 watts. RST was S5 received S9.

_________________
"All religious stuff aside, the fact is people who can't kill will always be subject to those who can." - Brad "Iceman" Colbert, Generation Kill

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:15 am 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
doitnstyle1 wrote:
I don't know if this is only for CW QRP but, I have the Yaesu ft-857 for my main rig at home, but I just got the Xiegu X108G Outdoor version which is about a mid range priced QRP radio. It has the benefit of going up to 20 W when plugged in to a 13.8 v power source and up to 15 W for 12 v battery operation. I like it. It doesn't have all the filters that my Yaesu has but it still does a pretty good job with SSB. I have yet to try CW or data. It has all the ports that the Yaesu has so I can interchange accessories. The owners manual is minimal at best but There is enough out there right now to support it on the web. It is very light at almost 2 lbs. Battery draw is minimal but yet untested.

I made my first contact on 20 m from Colorado to Pennsylvania on 20 watts. RST was S5 received S9.


The Xiegu X108G is not a Trail Friendly radio. The front mounted display is incredibly "busy" as well.

I have have been reading a few reviews where folks are happy - I'd like to see how these fare over time.

Thanks for reading the post!

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:23 am 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
Image
Source and Vendor website - Elecraft® Hands-On Ham Radio™

First - this is one expensive radio set -

Radio - $750. (on sale now 'just' 725)
with internal tuner- just $930
with tuner and internal battery - $990
with mike, tuner, internal battery - $1050 and
with mike, tuner, internal battery, mike and custom CW paddles - $1160.
Battery charger - extra, carry case, extra and so on.

Wanted to get that out of the way first off.

Go to Vendor website link above to see all the specifics on modes, etc.
Short version - CW/SSB and will send PSK31 using paddles. Decodes PSK 31, RTTY, decodes CW. 10 Watts out.
All this and only a bit thicker and a bit longer than a HB-1B or MFJ 9200.

So, now what?
Well, it is light weight, has a built in mike and with a loaded whip, tuner, internal battery, the rig can be used as an HF handi-talki. Cool.

I'm using a earbud set made for Smartphones (with an adapter) and the VOX function for SSB- so, no bulky mike and hands-free operation. Big plus. You will need paddles - either the OEM or a set you happen to like to run CW and other digital modes. Battery input is ~12VDC.

Large, bright and easy to read LCD display. Cool. Backlight can be shut off to save battery. Really cool. The LCD is daylight readable - major kudos.

Power is adjustable in .1 watt increments. Just the thing for field use. Using 'just enough' power to make a contact.

Filtering. OMG - I bought this for the filtering.... You have to hear it to believe it. Very narrow CW filter and NO ringing. Major kudos.

Covers from AM broadcast band (low sensitivity) and all of HF up to 30 MHz - AM/SSB/CW and as noted can send PSK-31 using paddles for input. Wunderbar.

Did I mention this is a SDR rig? Upgrades by downloading a single file. Good stuff.

I could go on, but let me get to the stuff I don't like - not much, but it's there.

Internal battery must be removed to be charged with an external (and extra cost) charger. Boo. I've seen reports where constant removal/insertion is causing issues. I didn't buy one. I use an external NiMH pack and a 6 foot cable - lets me keep the battery inside my parka. Warm batteries work better.

The port for the key - and the pins related to the key - are exposed. No cover came with the rig. For the better part of a grand, why be so damn cheap? A strip of plastic or metal and a couple of screws - what would that cost at the OEM level - a dollar? (Shakes head) The programming connector is also exposed. Bad show.

What else?

Oh, the end cap protectors and cover - like these
Cost - $49.95. The cover? - heck, get both for $78.

Image

I would have loved to order these end protectors and cover as an OEM option and would
have paid $100 to have these from the get-go. Seems Elecraft is missing a bet on offering these.

Lets see....what else? Nope, nothing else. Would I like a nice heavy steel case like on the -9200? Yeah. Would I like a nice case that was not sealed, but at least nearly hole free? Yeah.... But, it's good as is, I'll just use a Pelican case to carry it.

This is expensive, but it comes with a feature set to match.

Is it worth the cost? Well - that's up to you to decide. I'm happy with mine, even if I had to sell three of my rigs to raise the ducats. Now when I travel, I'll be able to work CW and SSB and PSK-31 and RTTY and and and - with just a small battery pack, compact paddles and a simple piece of wire. Earbuds from the phone will provide dual duty. Oh wait, I can skip the battery pack and use a cigarette lighter plug in the rental for power...

It is a great time to be a ham.

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:03 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2013 12:34 am
Posts: 606
Location: CM97
Has thanked: 20 times
Been thanked: 38 times
Given the price of the KX3 my vote is still for the FT-817. But I have never used a KX3. So it might very well be worth the money.

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

_________________
Apathy wrote:
We are a bunch of adults who own too many guns and actively prepare for the zombie apocalypse. There is something wrong with each and every one of us.


Emergency prep and Autism

Acronyms

My photography and art


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:07 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2013 12:34 am
Posts: 606
Location: CM97
Has thanked: 20 times
Been thanked: 38 times
doitnstyle1 wrote:
I don't know if this is only for CW QRP but, I have the Yaesu ft-857 for my main rig at home, but I just got the Xiegu X108G Outdoor version which is about a mid range priced QRP radio. It has the benefit of going up to 20 W when plugged in to a 13.8 v power source and up to 15 W for 12 v battery operation. I like it. It doesn't have all the filters that my Yaesu has but it still does a pretty good job with SSB. I have yet to try CW or data. It has all the ports that the Yaesu has so I can interchange accessories. The owners manual is minimal at best but There is enough out there right now to support it on the web. It is very light at almost 2 lbs. Battery draw is minimal but yet untested.

I made my first contact on 20 m from Colorado to Pennsylvania on 20 watts. RST was S5 received S9.

That looks interesting. It's cheap enough that I might save my pennies for one. But an FT-857 is more of a priority.

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

_________________
Apathy wrote:
We are a bunch of adults who own too many guns and actively prepare for the zombie apocalypse. There is something wrong with each and every one of us.


Emergency prep and Autism

Acronyms

My photography and art


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:16 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:16 am
Posts: 1081
Location: Western Slope, Colorado
Has thanked: 17 times
Been thanked: 27 times
I love my FT-857 but I wanted a more portable one. Price since I already spent the money on a higher end radio is a factor. For teh price of the Xiegu I felt I got a good radio.

I also beg to differ. I think with some modifications that I am working on it would be a very trail friendly radio. I will update with pics and further info as soon as I get all my parts in. I don't plan on spending much money on this and maing it a light and transportable as possible.

I would love a KX3. I played with one a couple of weeks ago but the power factor really bothered me as I couldn't get past all the other callers. With 20 watts on my Xiegu, I fairly easily got through. The price is also a pretty good reason why I won't buy one for a while.

_________________
"All religious stuff aside, the fact is people who can't kill will always be subject to those who can." - Brad "Iceman" Colbert, Generation Kill

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:39 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3736
Has thanked: 1540 times
Been thanked: 465 times
TacAir wrote:

Oh, the end cap protectors and cover - like these
Cost - $49.95. The cover? - heck, get both for $78.

Image

I would have loved to order these end protectors and cover as an OEM option and would
have paid $100 to have these from the get-go. Seems Elecraft is missing a bet on offering these.



I know the guy at Gems who sells these and Elecraft supports his efforts because they don't want to to become sidetracked dealing with too many accessories. I have the end plates and cover for my KX3

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2017 2:34 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3736
Has thanked: 1540 times
Been thanked: 465 times
KeychainQRP 160m Band - World's smallest Ham Radio HF Transmitter $39.95+

https://www.etsy.com/listing/506756455/ ... _gallery_2

Image


KeychainQRP is a micro-sized CW (morse code) transmitter. It is currently available in 5 different Amateur Radio Bands.

This version is for the 160m Ham Band and has an operating frequency of 1.8432 MHz.

Other Ham Bands are also available for sale in the QuirkyQRPHamRadio Store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/QuirkyQRPHamRadios

Keep one attached to your car keys, and rest assured that you will always have an HF Transmitter in your pocket everywhere you go.

More importantly they are tons of fun!

Add some on-the-air realism to your next ham club morse code practice session, and ditch that silly code practice oscillator.

When paired with an inexpensive multi-band shortwave receiver, a very effective transceiver setup can be achieved. (Remember: Many dual band VHF/UHF handheld ham radios have a built-in wide band receive mode that will typically cover shortwave broadcast as well as HF ham bands.)



Typical Power Output: 160 milliwatts max with 9v battery

Antenna Connector: SMA female 50 ohm (A simple low pass filter, or band pass filter is recommended)

Built-in LED Transmit indicator.

Dimensions: 1" x 1" x 0.75"

KeychainQRP Transmitters are proudly handmade in The United States of America.


The following frequencies are also available upon special request:

160m band: 1.850 MHz
20m band: 14.148 MHz
17m band: 18.080 Mhz
15m band: 21.168 MHz
6m band: 50.000 MHz
6m band: 50.350 MHz
6m band: 51.840 MHz
6m band: 53.248 MHz

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2017 7:58 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
teotwaki wrote:
KeychainQRP 160m Band - World's smallest Ham Radio HF Transmitter $39.95+

https://www.etsy.com/listing/506756455/ ... _gallery_2

Image


KeychainQRP is a micro-sized CW (morse code) transmitter. It is currently available in 5 different Amateur Radio Bands.

SNIP



If $40 is your 'fun' level - try this-
The Half-pint CW tranciever. (http://www.rossi.us/halfpint/)
Specifications

Power supply: 9-20 volts DC
Receive current: 35 mA @ 13.8 VDC
Power output: up to 1 Watt on the 40 meter band with 16 VDC power supply
Receiver sensitivity: approximately 10 uV @ 10 dB S/N
Audio gain: 42 dB + 20dB from Q-Multiplier = 62 dB
Receiver Selectivity: less than 500 Hz

Sourced on flea-bray for $25!
http://www.ebay.com/itm/QRP-transciever ... 2377360922

Can be had on 20 and 40M - no coils to wind as it uses potted inductors.


Image

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2017 1:51 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
Folks have said - If China ever decides to sell a low-cost SSB radio....

Now you have several choices. NOTE - these are SSB/CW single band units.

You Kits (who else) now has a single band, 40M, DDS vfo rig. Priced at $189, pretty eye watering price point.

New for 2017: SK-1A 40m single band QRP SSB/CW transceiver. Sold as an assembled item only.

Size HxWxD: 1.5" x 3.5" x 5"
Weight: 9.8 oz
DC input: 10-15 VDC
Power consumption: RX 60 mA, 50 mA with backlight off. TX, 800 mA.
TX: 7.0-7.3 MHz
RX: 5.9-8 MHz

IF: 50 MHz DDS
Output power: 5-6W at 12 VDC, 8-9W at 13.8 VDC
CW sidetone: 700 Hz
Internal keyer: 5-40 WPM adjustable
Antenna connector: BNC male
Hand microphone supplied with unit. Microphone input jack on rear of case.
#18650 internal battery pack and charging cable sold as an optional accessory
This item is supplied without a DC power cable by YouKits. Vibroplex is making an inexpensive DC power pigtail available for them, model YDC. ($0.75)

http://www.vibroplex.com/contents/media ... _front.jpg

Full coverage 40 M and a DDS VFO. Just Damn. That is cheap. I'm now a kinda fan of the You Kits owing to good quality build - but - still no tech data, so, still a no-no for me.

The CR folks also offer single band HF

The KN-Q7A has reappeared as the "S-series". I assume S = single band.

http://www.larvell.net/CatHAM_Radio/ima ... Series.jpg

THIS IS A KIT.
Product Shipped by QRVTronics.com in US:

All cases shipped from US come with holes pre-drilled, unless otherwise requested.

One foot is modified with self starting screw to allow easier removal of PC board without having to unsolder Voltage Regulator.

Surface Mount Transistor will be mounted at no additional charge, if requested. Comes with speaker mike and DDS VFO. This item is shipped USPS Express Mail.

US Kit Cost is $155 plus shipping

Additional Charge for Pre-Built Unit - Special Order
Only $70.00 Extra or about $239 out the door for a per-built kit.
The kits are listed for both 40M and 20M right now, there is talk of other bands 'soon'.

Okay - the You Kits beats this by about $50 and that is for an assembled unit (You Kits vs CR). The kit has the tech data to assemble and I assume, keep it running.

Specifications of kit:

. Dimension: 153 mm x 97 mm x 40 mm, not including connectors and knobs
6.0 x 3.75 x 2.0 inches including feet - IOW - small.

. Weight assembled: 12 oz, not including microphone
. Power Supply: 12 to 13.8 V, 3 A
. Current consumption: 70 mA in RX and about 2 A in TX @ 13.8 V
. [i]RF output: about 5-10 W PEP @ 13.8 V[/i]
. Sandwich digital VFO integrated with the LED hole pre-drilled
. Innovative one LED frequency display
. Stable and accurate frequency like a crystal
. Both USB and LSB are be supported by changing BFO frequency in calibration mode
. Sensitivity: about 0.5 uV at 10 dB SNR
. UNBAL jumper added to intentionally break the balance of NE602 to allow more
convenient TX power peak alignment and antenna tuning
. Low dropout (protection) diode is used to allow a bit more battery life
. Final power amplifier changed to IRF510 and minor change in LPF circuit
. Speaker microphone added to the standard configuration
. IF filter: 6 pole crystal ladder filter + 1 pole post IF amplifier crystal filter
. IF bandwidth: about 2.0 KHz
. IF frequency: 8.467 MHz
. Connectors: Speaker, Microphone and Antenna
. Antenna Connector is: BNC type

This is the basic KN-Q7A redone as a SSB rig - so 40M - ~10 watts and 20M ~5 watts.

Can't wait to see the next shoe drop in the QRP SSB wars. Great time to be a ham.

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2017 2:21 pm 
Offline
BANNED

Joined: Fri Apr 28, 2017 1:36 pm
Posts: 504
Location: VA
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 5 times
I would look on alibaba or aliexpress. That's where I got most of my ham radios and u pay a fraction of the cost as u would for a brand name and they work the same. I bought two mobile units I put in my car and one for my bfs car for like 150 dollars but I did have to pay like 50 dollars in shipping but it was still a deal for two units. And I got some handhelds but I actually stopped playing on my hams a couple years ago cause its always the same old farts and I have way more fun on the CB cause its always diff people or just on the FRS grms frequencies its surprising how many people r on those channels. So yeah. Ham is good to have ready for long distance talking when the world ends but cb n FRS is fun and u can still get 25 miles with a cb with a good antenna and a few miles with FRS if ur using a good walkie talkie like I use a ICOM and Motorola and just program in the frequencies myself. I had to buy those radios locally unfortunately and were expensive but I also use them for my job and I wanted personal walkie talkies instead of the ones they provided


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:32 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Posts: 7883
Has thanked: 168 times
Been thanked: 284 times
AS if it could get any better.

The Chnese now have a McHF clone on the market. The McHF is currently only sold as a kit - now, thanks to the magic a Chinese copy - you can buy the assembled rig.

Image

Recent RS-918SSB Recent is the mfg on the mainland of China.

$350 + shipping from China.

Specs-

Spectrum Dynamic Waterfall Display
Multiple Working Modes: Receive,Transmit,Tune,VFO,SPLIT
DSP Digital Signal Processing Noise Reduction
Automatic Notch Filter
Humanized Interface Color Display
Receive Fine Tuning Function, Changeable MIC Gain Value
VCC Power Supply Voltage Indication Table
Transmit Signal Strength Display Table
Multifunctional Instrument: SWR Meter, AVD Audio Frequency Meter, ALC Signal Modulation Meter
Does digital voice using FreeDV protocol.....

RS-918SSB Technical Specifications

Frequency Range – RX: 1.8-30MHz TX:All HAM HF BANDS
Operating Mode – SSB(J3E),CW,AM(RX Only), FM, FREE-DV
TX Power – 5W (Standard, DC 13.8V) , 15W (Full,DC 13.8V)
Receiving Sensitivity – 0.11~0.89μV (RFC 50-20)
Minimum Frequency Step – 1Hz
Operating Voltage – DC9~15V
Antenna Impedance – 50Ω
Frequency Stability – ±1.5PPM @ Power on 5 Minutes (Standard) ; ±0.5PPM if Optional TCXO Used
Product Dimension (W × H × D) – 215×74×62mm(Mounting Bracket Included)
Weight – 623g
Pretty eye-watering.

As far as I can discover, the RS-918SSB is based on the well known mcHF QRP transceiver project originally designed by Chris M0NKA. I don't know if this is a licensed copy - otherwise, pretty ballsy to even mark the rig as a McHF. Still digging...
The McHF site is silent on any licensing deal, but several posters have made note of the clone - which
can be had, the kit, not so much.... The software is open source, so that isn't an issue.

Pretty cool - but wait as they say!

Xiegu 5105 is now on the market - not vaporware any longer. By the folks that make the X108G QRP rig.

Image

$650 is the current street price. The X108G, on Amazon is $520
See the tech specs elsewhere.

Both of these rigs are SDR. I've said once the Chinese really enter the market, they will kill the competion - at least initially.

The Elecraft KX2, which is in the class of radio, sells for $750. With service and support in North America. Oh, and full technical documentation is available. As is out-of-warranty service. Not so much for the Chinese rigs.

I'e not posted anything on FX series rigs, as they are a 'garage' outfit - as in making the radio in a garage. These two are from large commercial outfits that supply LMR/SMR and Marine markets.

It is a wonderful time to be ham with more and more radios hitting the market at really astounding price points.

_________________
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:13 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3736
Has thanked: 1540 times
Been thanked: 465 times
On Amazon the Recent RS-918 is $600 so direct from China is better

[YouTube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=16&v=oLlWhmxCjI0[/YouTube]

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 94 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group