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PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2016 1:23 pm 
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So what your saying is once they are in place and maybe get a little time to get used to the surroundings then I can judge based on how they act just walking up to them to try to get a feel for if that will set them off or not. But it would probably be a good idea to make the area I intend to put them a little more "slow growth" oriented?

I have considered covering the area with pine needles in the hopes that will stifle the grass/weed growth. I have about 50 100' tall white pines around my house so there is no shortage of pine needles for mulch. Is there a general rule for how much of a territorial bubble to give them?

Another question: what about my free range chickens? should there be a fence in place to limit their access to the hive? will they sit and eat all my bees?

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2016 2:11 pm 
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GentryMillMan wrote:
So what your saying is once they are in place and maybe get a little time to get used to the surroundings then I can judge based on how they act just walking up to them to try to get a feel for if that will set them off or not. But it would probably be a good idea to make the area I intend to put them a little more "slow growth" oriented?

I have considered covering the area with pine needles in the hopes that will stifle the grass/weed growth. I have about 50 100' tall white pines around my house so there is no shortage of pine needles for mulch. Is there a general rule for how much of a territorial bubble to give them?

Another question: what about my free range chickens? should there be a fence in place to limit their access to the hive? will they sit and eat all my bees?



Slow growth would probably be best, I don't like to mow or weedeat around them because I'm sure it stresses them out a bit regardless. And as for a safety bubble, honestly I've sat right in front, less than 1 foot away and they go about their business, you'll have some land in your hair and buzz you. Again it does depend on the hive, I've got one that just hates me, they don't mind others, just don't like me.

Mom has free range chickens, and I've yet to see them eat a bee. They aren't near the hives however, I know Ani has live stock maybe she can answer that better.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2016 4:55 pm 
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I find that our livestock don't bother the hives, even the chickens. The chickens did eat the dead bees we had when certain hives didn't survive the winter, but they did not go down to the hives to eat them, we dumped the bees in a pile near them. The chickens sometimes go near the hives, but do not bother them. We provide water in the tops of our rain barrels where the bees prefer to drink and we provide sheet moss for them to stand on, so their water source is up high where the chickens do not have ready access to the bees when they drink. Our goats occasionally go down there near the hives to browse, but have not bothered the hives.

We recently put landscape fabric topped with pea gravel under the hives, but we still have to mow around the area. Hubby wears his bee suit and bush hogs the area a few times per year. We used to have to weed eat close to the hives, but changing to the "ant proof" hive stand gave us the opportunity to lay something under mostly for convenience. We have a couple of docile hives and one very mean hive. The mean bees will sometimes chase hubby and our beekeeping kid all the way to the house when they come back up from beekeeping duties, but they are the very best producers and we would not give them up for anything. We do try to minimize bothering them. If you can afford putting something down something under the hives to get rid of the grass, I recommend it for convenience and to reduce certain pest problems. Hive beetles, for example, reproduce in the soil under hives. If you can reduce their access to soil, you may be able to reduce their populations.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 3:16 pm 
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I don't know what we can do about it, but many localities are air-spraying to kill mosquitoes which is also killing bees. When it's hot and they're bearding, is there anyway to protect our bees from aerial spraying? It seems to me like this is a very bad way to control mosquito populations. I think we need to keep abreast of what our governments are doing about Zika and speak up if they are taking these kinds of steps.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 5:20 pm 
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Anianna wrote:
I don't know what we can do about it, but many localities are air-spraying to kill mosquitoes which is also killing bees. When it's hot and they're bearding, is there anyway to protect our bees from aerial spraying? It seems to me like this is a very bad way to control mosquito populations. I think we need to keep abreast of what our governments are doing about Zika and speak up if they are taking these kinds of steps.


Beat me to this, just read an article about how they completely wiped out a comercial apiary by spraying. The farmer lost something like 1000 hives :shock:

I don't have to worry about it where I am, but I worry for those of you who do. I wonder if you could contact the authorities and ask them if they are going to be spraying. If they say yes figure out what day and as much as it may suck for the hive..... block them in. Wake up early, use one of the entrance reducers to completely block the exit and leave them like that for a day. Perhaps one of those 10x10 popup covers with the side walls. put that around the hives and then tape the seams.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 5:41 pm 
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If I were him, I'd be sending the authorities a bill and getting a lawyer.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 4:06 pm 
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Have any of you harvested comb? Hubby is interested in getting into comb harvest at some point and there seems to be several systems for harvesting it:

Hogg Halfcomb, which consists of a box of 40 trays, as far as I can tell. Add a lid to each tray as the bees fill them up. I believe these hold 10-12 oz of honeycomb each. You can buy refills of the trays for each box and each box placed on the hive like a super. I'm not clear if this is designed for eight or ten frame hives, but it looks like tens, to me. The maker sells honeycomb in these trays for $14 for a 12 oz. That's a pretty profit even with the expensive system.

Bee-O-Pac, which consists of plastic molded trays that clip together to form their own frame to hang in the hive. It looks to me like you get 128 trays per super (16 trays per frame, eight Bee-O-Pac frames per super) and each tray holds about 4 oz of honeycomb.

Ross Rounds, which consist of a lot of parts. If I understand correctly, this is a super of trays that hold round rings. The bees fill the rings with honeycomb and then the rings are removed from the tray and placed in a round container. I'm not clear if it is four or eight rings per tray, so I can't tell how many you get per super or how much they hold. Once the ring is full, it is taken out of the super and placed into a round container.

With the Hogg and Bee-O-Pac systems, it appears that you would have to clean the outsides of the containers of propolis and comb before you can place a lid on them and sell them. I'm not sure how much cleaning of the outside of the rings would be needed for the Ross Round system, if any. It seems to me that most of the mess would remain on the trays in the hive. At some point, I would like to try at least the Hogg and Rounds systems to compare them. The Bee-O-Pac appears to be the least expensive but the most work.

Another option is the jar method mentioned previously in this thread. They would hold a greater volume of honeycomb and are probably the cheapest of all of the in-hive container options. It does not seem very space-efficient to me, though.

Finally, there is the old fashioned method of simply cutting the come from a standard frame and placing it in a container. Beekeeping suppliers sell square boxes just for this purpose, though you could probably get suitable containers from bulk stores like Costco or Sam's Club.

Have you guys tried any of these? What was your experience? Are there other options?


ETA: Apparently, there are wood options, as well, in the form of "Kelley squares" and "Romanov sections". The Romanov sections appear to be the wooden version of the previously mentioned rounds, though very uncomplicated save for bending your own sections from soft wood. The Kelley boxes appear to be complicated and expensive for what they are. I am really liking the Romanov sections and think we may try those. They fit in the same boxes you can get for cut comb, but seem less messy.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 5:40 pm 
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I've only done the old school. I use plastic molds, so I don't ha e to mess with actual wax. It's pretty easy to just cut them and then use a spatula to remove. The first (like with brownies) is usually the messiest, after that it's pretty easy to get out. However I find that selling them is pretty hit or miss, I'm used to a younger crowd who don't know chickens have bones. So seeing anything that's not in bear freaks them out a little.

I've looked at harvesting wax however I seem to know and oddly large amount of people who make their own hand lotions, lip balms, candles, and other wax related items. But haven't researched much into it though.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:38 pm 
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Halfapint wrote:
I've only done the old school. I use plastic molds, so I don't ha e to mess with actual wax. It's pretty easy to just cut them and then use a spatula to remove. The first (like with brownies) is usually the messiest, after that it's pretty easy to get out. However I find that selling them is pretty hit or miss, I'm used to a younger crowd who don't know chickens have bones. So seeing anything that's not in bear freaks them out a little.

I've looked at harvesting wax however I seem to know and oddly large amount of people who make their own hand lotions, lip balms, candles, and other wax related items. But haven't researched much into it though.


I have seen a post where somebody uses a glass loaf pan to separate the wax from other materials with some heat. I wish I could find it again. I *think* they just put the messy wax in the pan, heated it a bit in the oven, and everything separated neatly, but I can't be sure without seeing it again.

Otherwise, if you are just after wax, it seems to me that timing would get you clean wax since they build the wax out before filling it. For example, on the Romanov section system, there's this image taken five days after the frames are inserted:

Image

That is some seriously clean looking wax. If you cut that out and put the frames back in, they could just start again building the wax out and you could harvest more wax a few days later or let them build out comb and fill it up.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 7:02 pm 
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That might be an idea. Maybe I'll try it on one of my hives this year. Good thinking!

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 9:01 pm 
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If anybody is interested in trying the Honey Super Cell frames (drawn, plastic cells - the bees don't have to build cells first) or needs more, the HSC website is no longer available (I will fix this on my original post). The only place I can find that sells them is Simpson's Beekeeping. Their site is a hot mess that looks old and defunct and is not an online store. As I write this, their "order form" doesn't function and you couldn't post a payment there anyway. However, they are still around and selling both bees and the wares listed on the site. You have to contact them directly to order, but they do respond pretty quickly and seem like good people to deal with.

Keep in mind:
You can only use the HSC frames with small cell bees. Larger bees don't fit properly.
If you get the black super cell frames, it is easier to view eggs and larvae.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 9:06 pm 
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I get all my supplies from mannlakeltd. The website is a bit odd, but you get "beepoints" and can use them toward future purchases. They do actually have the plastic cells and theirs are coated in wax. which helps the bees take to the plastic.

I say odd because you can order online, but the layout of where everything is based on their printed catalog.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 9:12 pm 
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Halfapint wrote:
I get all my supplies from mannlakeltd. The website is a bit odd, but you get "beepoints" and can use them toward future purchases. They do actually have the plastic cells and theirs are coated in wax. which helps the bees take to the plastic.

I say odd because you can order online, but the layout of where everything is based on their printed catalog.


I thought I had checked Mannlake for them. We get feeder paddies from them. Is it the Rite-Cell? It's quite a bit more expensive than the HSC.

ETA: I added the MannLake Rite-Cell to the original post.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:07 pm 
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Where you looking at the foundations?

https://www.mannlakeltd.com/shop-all-ca ... e-cell-reg

and yeah I suppose they aren't cheap. However they do last, forever. I have been scraping them off with a pressure washer because some sat outside and got all moldy. Others had wax moths (dirty little bastards!). We reinvested all the profits we had mad into more equipment, spent almost a grand on an order. I will hopefully grow my apiary this year. I have some prospects lined up, they walked around a in November and like what I have and like that I'm close by. So we'll see. If I can maintain 20-25 hives this summer I'll be on track!

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:15 pm 
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Halfapint wrote:
Where you looking at the foundations?

https://www.mannlakeltd.com/shop-all-ca ... e-cell-reg

and yeah I suppose they aren't cheap. However they do last, forever. I have been scraping them off with a pressure washer because some sat outside and got all moldy. Others had wax moths (dirty little bastards!). We reinvested all the profits we had mad into more equipment, spent almost a grand on an order. I will hopefully grow my apiary this year. I have some prospects lined up, they walked around a in November and like what I have and like that I'm close by. So we'll see. If I can maintain 20-25 hives this summer I'll be on track!


Oh, I guess it's Rite-Cell Pro Frame, not just Rite-Cell. That is the full plastic frames, right? Why do all the beekeeping dealers have such vague descriptions on their stuff? 0.o

We just powerwashed a bunch of our HSC frames, too. How do you get wax moths in a plastic frame?? Ours were just dirty.

ETA: I don't mean plastic foundation, I mean fully drawn plastic frame.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2017 12:48 pm 
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Actually mannlake redid their website and it's actually........ decent!

I have no idea WHY they are so vague, couple of sites don't even have explanations. drives me nuts, I'm not a professional bee keeper, I don't know all the names for things! Give me a bloody description! I didn't get was moths on the plastic alone, I got them in the drawn wax. I try to keep them so they don't have to build more wax the following year.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2017 12:59 pm 
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Halfapint wrote:
Actually mannlake redid their website and it's actually........ decent!

I have no idea WHY they are so vague, couple of sites don't even have explanations. drives me nuts, I'm not a professional bee keeper, I don't know all the names for things! Give me a bloody description! I didn't get was moths on the plastic alone, I got them in the drawn wax. I try to keep them so they don't have to build more wax the following year.


Yea, it's confusing now that they make plastic frame+foundation all-in-one unit. The Rite-Cell appears to be the plastic frame+foundation stuff. The HSC isn't foundation, it's full plastic cells. The bees don't have to build cells at all. We don't have to try to store it in the freezer or in plastic in the off season because wax moths don't care for the plastic and everything else can just be powerwashed off before we use them again. We did have some spider eggs in ours, but that was it.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2017 2:05 pm 
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Do the bees like them??? Mine seem to be really picky. They don't seem to take to plast anything well. I rub wax on them and try to make it as real as possible but they know. Once it's been built up they don't seem to care much.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2017 2:46 pm 
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Halfapint wrote:
Do the bees like them??? Mine seem to be really picky. They don't seem to take to plast anything well. I rub wax on them and try to make it as real as possible but they know. Once it's been built up they don't seem to care much.


The only problem we had was before we learned that you are only supposed to use small cell bees with the plastic cell frames and our bees were not specifically small cell. They sometimes had difficulty getting in and out, but they made it work. We've taken it out of all the hives with larger bees and are adding two more hives of small cell bees this year.

Then again, all of our foundations are plastic, too, so it's not like our bees have much choice. If we have any non-plastic foundations, they came in nucs.

I think we're putting any profits from honey this year into getting a table saw with a dado blade so we can build our own hives from now on. Hubby also wants try going foundationless in honey supers and I'm thinking of building those Romanov section frames for simple comb harvesting. Hubby and I think we'll just not bother building the little box inserts, though, and just cut the comb out of the sections instead. The sections should give strength to the frame without foundation or wire.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 6:25 am 
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Here's a story I think this group might enjoy...

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nati ... /97695924/

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 2:11 pm 
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NamelessStain wrote:
Here's a story I think this group might enjoy...

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nati ... /97695924/


Interesting. I assume they didn't remove all of the comb if they think they didn't get the queen and if there is still so much honey dripping.

Quote:
Luckily for Hughes, she also found dozens of dead bees in the attic, a hint that the hive wasn’t active.


Tens of thousands of bees and several pounds of dripping honey doesn't sound like it wasn't active to me!

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