Virgin Gardener

Discuss lifestyle changes to better survive disasters. This category is for topics pertaining to being self reliant such as DIY, farming, alternative energy, autonomous solutions to water collection and waste removal, etc.

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zobmiedown
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by zobmiedown » Fri Sep 06, 2013 10:10 am

So along the snake topic. Yesterday I was watering my vegetable gardens with my morning coffee. I am standing at the one I just put acorn squash seeds on Monday which is a three foot tall raised bed. I was admiring how the seeds have already sprouted when I look straight down inside the bed right fucking in front of me and there is a 4 foot long bull snake. I really don't care if he did not like my coffee being dumped all over him as I jumped back three feet and almost shit my pants. This is why I hate f-ing snakes. Even my two year old son knows not to do shit like that before I have had at least a pot of coffee and never before noon. :evil:
Regulators mount up.

jdev
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by jdev » Tue Sep 10, 2013 7:08 pm

zobmiedown wrote:So along the snake topic. Yesterday I was watering my vegetable gardens with my morning coffee. I am standing at the one I just put acorn squash seeds on Monday which is a three foot tall raised bed. I was admiring how the seeds have already sprouted when I look straight down inside the bed right fucking in front of me and there is a 4 foot long bull snake. I really don't care if he did not like my coffee being dumped all over him as I jumped back three feet and almost shit my pants. This is why I hate f-ing snakes. Even my two year old son knows not to do shit like that before I have had at least a pot of coffee and never before noon. :evil:
Not cool! I've been having bad snake dreams lately, too. Not cool.

zobmiedown
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by zobmiedown » Wed Sep 11, 2013 10:49 am

Sorry Jdev. I almost shot it just for spite. The only thing that prevented me from killing it is the fact that bull snakes eat rattle snakes and it can help with controlling the mice in my gardens. This year 4 ft bull snakes have been in my garden on my buddy's patio and under another buddy's porch. Of course I no longer garden in sandals since the incident. Combat boots for gardening only. For you know a full on caterpillar stomping war...... :twisted:
Regulators mount up.

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by jdev » Wed Sep 11, 2013 4:21 pm

zobmiedown wrote:Sorry Jdev. I almost shot it just for spite. The only thing that prevented me from killing it is the fact that bull snakes eat rattle snakes and it can help with controlling the mice in my gardens. This year 4 ft bull snakes have been in my garden on my buddy's patio and under another buddy's porch. Of course I no longer garden in sandals since the incident. Combat boots for gardening only. For you know a full on caterpillar stomping war...... :twisted:

:lol: I bet!

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drivepirate
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by drivepirate » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:35 am

:vmad: Just used 1/2 pot of coffee and 45min writing a decent post about a number of things including pictures and emoticons. Proofread it and with a big smile clicked submit realizing I was no longer logged in losing the entire post. Not the best way to get back into my favorite forum :crazy:

Will try again later...
Last edited by drivepirate on Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by drivepirate » Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:11 am

Take 2 and... ACTION!

zobmiedown I love what you've done with that pesky mesquite. I have a black locust tree out back that has all the evil properties of your mesquite minus the ability to provide a flavorful steak, treat my chickens or, supply flour for making backyard pumpkin bread good lord! :clap:

This is our second year of canning and we are getting more efficient. We haven't done soups or chili yet but I want to try. Our main problem is we are using a pressure caner on a ceramic flat top stove and it takes FOREVER to get up to temperature. I want to get a cast iron propane burner ($70) but I don't know about canning outside with the bugs and all. I suppose it wouldn't matter as long as my jars are closed and clean before I take them out.... Damn, where's my wallet?

Image
Tomatoes

Image
sliced pickles and jelly.

-Garden-
What a great year. The soaker hoses on a timer have made all the difference keeping everything producing and allowing our family to take trips enjoying the summer. I have discovered the wonders of horse manure and sawdust on strawberries, watched a lemon cucumber plant climb as tall as my green beans and, realized the undeniable need for mulch in many stages of growing.

Last week I got serious about fall planting. As usual I was a little late to the party and I know I'm rolling the dice on anything making it to maturity before frost but here we go anyway. My strategy for fall planting went like this. Each garden bed got a light tilling, slow release "organic" fertilizer, lime, and a fresh coat of expensive store bought compost to help with germination. I planted rows of lettuce, beets (crossed fingers), and turnips. Covered the rows with weed cloth to retain moisture. One bed has parsnips growing and I read that lettuce is a good companion for them so I peppered seeds in amongst the parsnips. In a partially occupied bed I seeded the unused portion with my leftover lettuce, turnip, and beet seeds by sprinkling them all together as an experiment, should be interesting. A week later there are turnip seedlings everywhere and the rows I covered with weed cloth all sprouted. The weather forecast calls for cloudy skies next week so I figured why stop planting now right? Yesterday I pulled everything out of the pepper bed, tilled, and planted rows of kale for the first time. I hope we like kale :?

Tomorrow I plan on talking with the soil expert at the feed store about cover crops vs. winter veggies. I assume that the season is too short for both here in the pacific northwest and taming the heavy clay soil is my priority but maybe I can do a little of each. Either way I'll get another load of horse bedding from the stables up the road and mix it in after we are done with the rest of the summer vegetables.

The changing of seasons never ceases to ground me. The views, the difference in the air and the old familiar smells... Filled with admiration for beautifully perfect chaos of it all, I cannot help but smile every time. :D

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by gundogs » Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:55 am

drivepirate wrote:Take 2 and... ACTION!

zobmiedown I love what you've done with that pesky mesquite. I have a black locust tree out back that has all the evil properties of your mesquite minus the ability to provide a flavorful steak, treat my chickens or, supply flour for making backyard pumpkin bread good lord! :clap:

This is our second year of canning and we are getting more efficient. We haven't done soups or chili yet but I want to try. Our main problem is we are using a pressure caner on a ceramic flat top stove and it takes FOREVER to get up to temperature. I want to get a cast iron propane burner ($70) but I don't know about canning outside with the bugs and all. I suppose it wouldn't matter as long as my jars are closed and clean before I take them out.... Damn, where's my wallet?

Image
Tomatoes

Image
sliced pickles and jelly.

-Garden-
What a great year. The soaker hoses on a timer have made all the difference keeping everything producing and allowing our family to take trips enjoying the summer. I have discovered the wonders of horse manure and sawdust on strawberries, watched a lemon cucumber plant climb as tall as my green beans and, realized the undeniable need for mulch in many stages of growing.

Last week I got serious about fall planting. As usual I was a little late to the party and I know I'm rolling the dice on anything making it to maturity before frost but here we go anyway. My strategy for fall planting went like this. Each garden bed got a light tilling, slow release "organic" fertilizer, lime, and a fresh coat of expensive store bought compost to help with germination. I planted rows of lettuce, beets (crossed fingers), and turnips. Covered the rows with weed cloth to retain moisture. One bed has parsnips growing and I read that lettuce is a good companion for them so I peppered seeds in amongst the parsnips. In a partially occupied bed I seeded the unused portion with my leftover lettuce, turnip, and beet seeds by sprinkling them all together as an experiment, should be interesting. A week later there are turnip seedlings everywhere and the rows I covered with weed cloth all sprouted. The weather forecast calls for cloudy skies next week so I figured why stop planting now right? Yesterday I pulled everything out of the pepper bed, tilled, and planted rows of kale for the first time. I hope we like kale :?

Tomorrow I plan on talking with the soil expert at the feed store about cover crops vs. winter veggies. I assume that the season is too short for both here in the pacific northwest and taming the heavy clay soil is my priority but maybe I can do a little of each. Either way I'll get another load of horse bedding from the stables up the road and mix it in after we are done with the rest of the summer vegetables.

The changing of seasons never ceases to ground me. The views, the difference in the air and the old familiar smells... Filled with admiration for beautifully perfect chaos of it all, I cannot help but smile every time. :D
Suggestion---cook down all those tomatos before canning. Supplies aren't cheap and you can reduce by 75%

zobmiedown
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by zobmiedown » Tue Sep 24, 2013 11:02 am

Divepirate, Sorry about your lost post but at least you had coffee. I have canned on our coleman camp stove that takes the little propane canisters. Only pickles though not the pressure canning. I do have an adapter for it now though that will allow me to hook it to a 5 gallon propane tank. I fill the jars inside on the kitchen counter though.

Just got back from a trip to the beach in Mexico again. Wow things change in four days. Now I have 8 pumpkin plants sprouted from our second planting. The acorn squash is insane as it was an entire squash worth of seeds we planted and I am pretty sure each one sprouted (and I still have 15 from the first crop to do something with). Second planting of zucchini and yellow squash have started to produce. God help us as we already have a freezer full of both of them and now have 10 plants of each blooming and producing. When we got back home yesterday we had 5 zucchini bigger than bam-bam's club on the flinstones. I planted the additional yellow squash and zucchini as a barter/charity crop. The girls in my wife's office all lost their zucchini plants to root rot so they have been asking if we had any extra. However, they did not ask until our first crop stopped producing. All my second cucumber crops have sprouted and seem to be coming along so hopefully I can put more pickles in cans than the kids can eat. Which is the same reason I now have 7 beds of peas growing and coming along nicely. Lets face it the two beds I had only allowed me to put two sandwich size Ziploc baggies in the freezer because the kids ate all the rest right off the plants. Can't keep them from eating so the only option is to grow more than they can eat.

I now have 15 gallons of mesquite flour ground up and on the shelves. 5 different family members and friends have now tried it for headaches and all agree that within 15 minutes their headaches were gone, so I am pleased with the results. besides it's great for cooking ad very healthy too. FYI mesquite breaded home made pickles deep fried are pure heaven. Especially with a buffalo and ranch dipping sauce blend. All the rest of the mesquite pods on the property are on the ground now and no longer good for human consumption but are being gathered for chicken feed. Also have been dehydrating the bad tomatoes that no one likes (bonnie grape and black cherry) for chicken feed too. But zombie down you don't have chickens you say. Yep you are right. However I am waiting until Sept 28th when the local chicken ranch is having a sale. $1.00 per baby chick. Gonna get me a ten pack of chickens at that price. Ok maybe more like 20 since I can't do anything just a little and I hate having change in my wallet.... :lol:

My father in law just gave me a freezer full of home grown beef so I had to plug in another freezer last week. So now I have more space for veggies in freezers as well. Well at least until December when Hopefully I get an elk on the hunt this year and fill the freezer with that.
Regulators mount up.

zobmiedown
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by zobmiedown » Tue Sep 24, 2013 2:00 pm

I found this in a different forum here on ZS but had to share as it is absolutely relevant here and hilarious.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... 9j8RBwSJtk
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drivepirate
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by drivepirate » Mon Sep 30, 2013 3:19 pm

Whew! For 2 weeks I've been trying to get up to the stables near me for some of their horse bedding and I finally got enough of a break in the rain to head up for truck load of compost. After putting on my rain gear I turned in 2 wheel barrels of compost into each bed, smoothed and, sprinkled a layer of fine compost on top. The plan is to sprinkle alsike clover seeds on the prepped beds as a cover crop for winter and a green manure in the spring.
Image

I also made little piles of compost between our rows of lettuce, beets, turnips and kale.
Image

I am debating whether I should seed the piles of compost between the vegetables with clover or not. The clover grows wide but not very tall so maybe we'll wait till next week and let the seedling get a little more of a head start. If nothing else we could lay down strips of weed cloth between rows.
Image

This "biointensive" strategy of crowding the garden beds has kept the weeds down and the soil workable. I hope that as long as I continue to get the horse bedding and rotate my crops, that the beds will become easier and easier to work with each season while producing well. This spring we will be forced to expand the garden adding 2 more 4x5 beds or reduce the amount of tomatoes we are producing if we are to rotate our crops properly.

zobmiedown
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by zobmiedown » Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:13 am

Dive pirate. I like the rows of compost between plants. I may have to do that myself. What is your compost made of? I have been composting garden scraps, egg shells, and coffee grounds. Now I am crushing up sea shells to add to it.

So since I was last on here we added 41 baby chickens to our food producing. Local farm was selling them for $1 per chick so we took all they had since they normally sell them for $5-10 per chick depending on the breed. we no have road island reds, pearl leghorns and two breeds or marans. Looks like I will be in the egg business next spring with a dozen organic eggs at walmart going for $5.48. My wife's coworkers have already offered to pay $5 per dozen when we get them.

Now I want to triple our growing areas and try my hand at a small organic vegetable/egg/talapia market maybe even selling jars of our pickles and home made salsa as well. Especially going to grow lots more okra next year as no place in our town sells it and everyone we have talked to has offered to buy some from us. Never in my life had I ever thought I would be running a fresh organic food shop in my future but hey seems to be a desire and a market so maybe we will make a go at it.
Regulators mount up.

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by Murphman » Wed Oct 16, 2013 7:52 am

zobmiedown wrote:Dive pirate. I like the rows of compost between plants. I may have to do that myself. What is your compost made of? I have been composting garden scraps, egg shells, and coffee grounds. Now I am crushing up sea shells to add to it.

So since I was last on here we added 41 baby chickens to our food producing. Local farm was selling them for $1 per chick so we took all they had since they normally sell them for $5-10 per chick depending on the breed. we no have road island reds, pearl leghorns and two breeds or marans. Looks like I will be in the egg business next spring with a dozen organic eggs at walmart going for $5.48. My wife's coworkers have already offered to pay $5 per dozen when we get them.

Now I want to triple our growing areas and try my hand at a small organic vegetable/egg/talapia market maybe even selling jars of our pickles and home made salsa as well. Especially going to grow lots more okra next year as no place in our town sells it and everyone we have talked to has offered to buy some from us. Never in my life had I ever thought I would be running a fresh organic food shop in my future but hey seems to be a desire and a market so maybe we will make a go at it.
Look into Black Soldier fly breeding to increase the protein for the chooks and tilapia. I almost have the plans for my acquaponics system ready to go and it is hopefully going to be 70% self-sufficient from the outset with the goal being 100% self-sufficiency after the kinks are worked out.
"If you are prepped for pandemic flu, you are more than prepped for Ebola. And pandemic flu is hella more likely, that's the one that scares me, personally." - Duodecima...and she's a freaking doctor. What are you?

zobmiedown
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by zobmiedown » Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:58 am

Thanks murphman I will have to do that. Not like the flies around here aren't bad enough already. Rural area where almost ever 4 acres has some form of livestock/horses.

The tilapia plan involves the pool at my buddy's place he is renting from my father. It has not been touched in 3 years so is a nice dark shade of green. It is fenced to keep local rodents out so we plan to build some garden beds all around it and tap into the already existing pool pump to create a hydroponics system. Just need some lumber, pvc pipe and garden soil oh yeah and some tilapia shipped in from some where as there is not a local source.
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prepper7
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by prepper7 » Tue Nov 19, 2013 7:33 pm

The 2014 Clickable USDA Grow Zone (Plant Hardiness) + Seed Finder Map is available at SeedsNow.com.
Where will YOU Appleseed?
phil_in_cs wrote: Get your rice and beans now, when you don't have to pay for them in blood.
squinty wrote:You wear "chaps" to break a bronco, you wear "assless chaps" because civilization has collapsed and you've gone feral.
Blacksmith wrote:That is an excellent topic for another thread. You should start one about that. Really.

prepper7
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by prepper7 » Thu Nov 21, 2013 8:38 pm

Okay container gardeners, want to know how many plants you can grow in a 12" container? The the Urban Organic Gardener. has a list.
Where will YOU Appleseed?
phil_in_cs wrote: Get your rice and beans now, when you don't have to pay for them in blood.
squinty wrote:You wear "chaps" to break a bronco, you wear "assless chaps" because civilization has collapsed and you've gone feral.
Blacksmith wrote:That is an excellent topic for another thread. You should start one about that. Really.

zobmiedown
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by zobmiedown » Tue Nov 26, 2013 12:09 pm

Great list p7 but some of that seems off to me. My Swiss chard is huge so I would think only one per container. WE have been down in freezing temp at night lately so a lot of my garden is dying off. Melons, squash, zucchini, beans and okra trimmed from 10 feet tall down to 3 feet tall and seem to want to produce again as there is on small okra on one plant now. all gone now, Peas are still hanging in and the broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage seem to like the cold. Tomatoes were liking it but are starting to die off as the peppers are all struggling now. Still producing but not like they were before. I have managed to put up 15 jars of salsa in the last month or so. Not bad since I make a huge batch every week and it usually never lasts the whole week. Artichoke plants have gotten huge lately. Asparagus still doing good. Sprouted an avocado from a store bought pit that is aver 15 inches tall now.

Got some old freight pallets and made a compost bin out of them. Been running vegetable scraps thru the dehydrator to make chicken feed. Have 41 young chickens that we got 4 $1 each and 5 full grown roosters that were free on craigslist. I was going to butcher the roosters soon. Only delay is that I am going elk hunting next week with my brother and father in law and if we get elk I don't want the freezers full of chicken and no room for elk meat so the roosters have caught a break for now. I already have people wanting to buy eggs from me once the hens get big enough and start laying. Seems everyone that found out we were growing okra wants to buy some next year as no where around here sells it except for frozen. So I looks like next year I will turn the gardens and chickens into a small business. Besides the nearest grocery store is 20 miles away so I could be the only market in the area. Looking at getting a tilapia pound going and possibly selling fresh fish and chicken meat from the roosters as well as eggs and baby chickens. The people I bought the baby chickens from posted an annual income last year of 120k from just selling eggs and chickens and I have 10 time more yard than they do and a second yard 4 acres at my buddy's house to work with as well. Which is where we have the pound too.

Oh and we got three young goats for $25 off of craigslist to help with mowing the native brush (weeds during monsoon get over 5 feet tall) and become an additional renewable meat source. So we named the goats mow, trim, and edge. So yes despite arguing on here that I am not a farmer was in fact futile as it has definitely gone that route lately. I am coming to terms with it. :cry: Maybe I can goby the term grocery store independent food growing and raising prepper who may turn a profit. Yeah that sounds better. :awesome:
Regulators mount up.

prepper7
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by prepper7 » Fri Nov 29, 2013 11:49 pm

Seeds Now http://www.SeedsNow.com BLACK FRIDAY DEAL - $5 off any order over $10. Apply code BFD5X10 during checkout. CODE EXPIRES DECEMBER 2, 2013.
Where will YOU Appleseed?
phil_in_cs wrote: Get your rice and beans now, when you don't have to pay for them in blood.
squinty wrote:You wear "chaps" to break a bronco, you wear "assless chaps" because civilization has collapsed and you've gone feral.
Blacksmith wrote:That is an excellent topic for another thread. You should start one about that. Really.

prepper7
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by prepper7 » Sat Nov 30, 2013 12:02 am

zobmiedown wrote:Great list p7 but some of that seems off to me. My Swiss chard is huge so I would think only one per container.
I think you're right, Zobmiedown. When I looked more closely and read the "disclaimer" that the numbers don't necessarily equate to best yield, etc., I thought, WTH? Such a guide absolutely should suggest spacing for optimum yield, plant health, etc. Do you think I should remove the list; does it do more harm than good?

For my bright lights chard, I find that 3-4 plants is a good number for bucket planters if the mature leaves are harvested regularly.

W2G on your livestock acquisitions! And I'm glad you're coming to terms with the, uh, "F-word". :lol:
Where will YOU Appleseed?
phil_in_cs wrote: Get your rice and beans now, when you don't have to pay for them in blood.
squinty wrote:You wear "chaps" to break a bronco, you wear "assless chaps" because civilization has collapsed and you've gone feral.
Blacksmith wrote:That is an excellent topic for another thread. You should start one about that. Really.

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by 72hours » Sat Nov 30, 2013 4:15 am

Well, we are into summer here, just a few weeks out from the first crops of tomatoes! I have about 6 heirlooms. Gherkins and dill are growing long, as are all my concurbits and gourds. Daikon is digging deep into their hills, intermingled with various plantings of carrots, beans and corn. Raspberries and boysenberries are plum ping, we've already harvested a half a dozen artichokes. Lettuces are pick as you go, and most things get a feed of home teas made from chicken manure and sea kelp.....

prepper7
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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by prepper7 » Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:29 am

72hours wrote:Well, we are into summer here, just a few weeks out from the first crops of tomatoes! I have about 6 heirlooms. Gherkins and dill are growing long, as are all my concurbits and gourds. Daikon is digging deep into their hills, intermingled with various plantings of carrots, beans and corn. Raspberries and boysenberries are plum ping, we've already harvested a half a dozen artichokes. Lettuces are pick as you go, and most things get a feed of home teas made from chicken manure and sea kelp.....

Really? Really??? I'm shivering (in California, no less) and you're bragging about your summer crops?!? :vmad:

Seriously, 72hours, it seems that you're going to have a nice harvest on your hands. Since beginning to grow my own herbs, I've grown to adore dill. What variety are you growing? Having freshy-fresh ("harvested steps from my door") 'chokes sounds nice. Not an option for my limited container garden, however.

The upside of our winter weather is the lettuce, spinach, and cilantro that I'll be having soon. :clap:
Where will YOU Appleseed?
phil_in_cs wrote: Get your rice and beans now, when you don't have to pay for them in blood.
squinty wrote:You wear "chaps" to break a bronco, you wear "assless chaps" because civilization has collapsed and you've gone feral.
Blacksmith wrote:That is an excellent topic for another thread. You should start one about that. Really.

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by gundogs » Sun Dec 01, 2013 9:17 am

Speaking of chard----did you know that chickens love chard plus it's good for them? I grow both Swiss and Rhubarb chard
for us and my birds. In the fall I dry a bunch to mix in the chicken's winter fare.
We eat the young leaves in salads & saute chopped large leaves in butter with some garlic

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by drivepirate » Mon Dec 09, 2013 11:42 pm

BRRRR!! The forecast around Thanksgiving called for a week of below freezing temperatures which is unfortunate since I am trying to "overwinter" Kale, Beet, and Turnips for the first time. I decided to test out my "carpentry skills" and build some cold frames in an attempt to save them.

Here is a shot I took real fast before I tacked one of them together.
Image

Here they are finished looking all sweet.
Image

There is Lettuce in there too and that overwintered great last year, but last year it didn't freeze for so long. This cold snap managed to freeze the soil about 1 1/4 inches and wilted the Turnips flat on the ground. The Lettuce looks damaged pretty bad but most is still upright. The Kale looks pretty flattened out but not as wilty so we'll see. I was so occupied with building the cold frames that I forgot to mulch anything, oops!.

On the bright side we have been waiting for the ground to freeze before eating our first Parsnips because I read that they taste sweeter after a good hard freeze, now what to use them in. I thought we could use them in place of potatoes in soup.

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by gundogs » Tue Dec 10, 2013 8:11 am

drivepirate wrote:BRRRR!! The forecast around Thanksgiving called for a week of below freezing temperatures which is unfortunate since I am trying to "overwinter" Kale, Beet, and Turnips for the first time. I decided to test out my "carpentry skills" and build some cold frames in an attempt to save them.

Here is a shot I took real fast before I tacked one of them together.
Image

Here they are finished looking all sweet.
Image

There is Lettuce in there too and that overwintered great last year, but last year it didn't freeze for so long. This cold snap managed to freeze the soil about 1 1/4 inches and wilted the Turnips flat on the ground. The Lettuce looks damaged pretty bad but most is still upright. The Kale looks pretty flattened out but not as wilty so we'll see. I was so occupied with building the cold frames that I forgot to mulch anything, oops!.

On the bright side we have been waiting for the ground to freeze before eating our first Parsnips because I read that they taste sweeter after a good hard freeze, now what to use them in. I thought we could use them in place of potatoes in soup.
Correct--parsnips do get sweeter after a few frosts. We slice and saute in butter,or sometimes mash 50/50 with potatoes.
Yes,they're good in soups and stews. I even allow some,along with carrots,to overwinter for a spring treat

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Re: Virgin Gardener

Post by prepper7 » Tue Dec 10, 2013 5:50 pm

Those cold frames are sweet, Drivepirate. Nice work!
Where will YOU Appleseed?
phil_in_cs wrote: Get your rice and beans now, when you don't have to pay for them in blood.
squinty wrote:You wear "chaps" to break a bronco, you wear "assless chaps" because civilization has collapsed and you've gone feral.
Blacksmith wrote:That is an excellent topic for another thread. You should start one about that. Really.

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