Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

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Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by ROBBYBEAR » Fri Jan 27, 2012 10:17 pm

I don't post much here so be gentle :D I have used my google-Fu and the search function but have not found much. Also I'm not sure where to put this.

I have some questions about protection from EMPs and Coronal Mass Ejections on a budget:
1. What is a good way of building a Faraday type device to protect ones electronics while staying on a relatively tight budget?

2. Is it true that common items like microwave ovens, metal lunch boxes and popcorn tins can be used for this type of protection?
Here is the site where I learned about the microwave oven trick http://americanpreppersnetwork.net/view ... 45&t=15371" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I read about the popcorn tin trick on Survival Blog which I have heard can be a wealth of inaccurate information.

3. Are you better off going with a product like these http://techprotectbag.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;?

Thanks for your answers!
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Erratic » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:18 am

What are you attempting to protect?
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sat Jan 28, 2012 6:15 am

Having read (almost) every post on this subject on this forum, I'm going with aluminum foil wraps. For the difference is one opinion to the next, and the money involved in the professional protection, I think wrapping an item in a blanket, then wrapping that up in tin foil brings me to about the same level of protection. Plus, it's simple, and I really, really like simple.

Anything that defeats that, well, I probably didn't need it anyway...
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Sat Jan 28, 2012 6:23 am

Tinfoil: the duct-tape of the paranoid.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by ROBBYBEAR » Sat Jan 28, 2012 8:29 am

Erratic wrote:What are you attempting to protect?
Electronics. Specifically small radios and other communication equipment.
KnightoftheRoc wrote:Having read (almost) every post on this subject on this forum, I'm going with aluminum foil wraps. For the difference is one opinion to the next, and the money involved in the professional protection, I think wrapping an item in a blanket, then wrapping that up in tin foil brings me to about the same level of protection. Plus, it's simple, and I really, really like simple.

Anything that defeats that, well, I probably didn't need it anyway...
That seems to be good to go for me. I wonder if adding tinfoil to say a lunchbox or popcorn tin would increase its effectiveness. Thank you.
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Dr Jekell » Sat Jan 28, 2012 8:59 am

If it is a small radio just disconnecting the antenna & battery will take of the problems for you.
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by TheRambler » Sat Jan 28, 2012 9:35 am

I am glad this subject came up. I am actually very knowledgable on it. First off, if its a true EMP either from the after effect of a nuke blast, or from another bomb designed to give off an EMP as its primary purpose, or if its just a solar flare etc removing the batteries/unpluging from an item WILL NOT PROTECT IT. An EMP damages circuitry at the component/board level, having power applied to or otherwise available to an item makes no difference.

How can you protect yourself? Well thats an easy question and a hard one all at the same time. The simple answer is shielding, but the amount of shielding depends on the intensity of the EMP and how close you were to the source. Lead is the best shielding material, however that is usually not a feasible option for most people. The next best shielding is metal at least 1/4in thick. If it is less than 1/4in thick and you are within roughly 2 miles of the source you will still be affected. After the inital 2 mile radius, the next 'line' is the 6 mile mark. From 2-6miles shielding roughly the thickness of 1/6in is sufficient. The type of metal does not matter, however lead is best. THE MAIN THING YOU NEED TO REMEMBER IS THAT WHATEVER SHIELDING YOU ARE USING, IT MUST BE GROUNDED TO EARTH GROUND OR THE EMP CAN NOT BE DISSIPATED. After 6 miles, the next radius is roughly to the 10 mile mark. Only very sensitive electronics will be effected in the 6-10 mile range, such as computers, and other items that use printed circuit boards. shielding for this range is typically around 2-3 sheets of alluminum foil. Past 10 miles only ungrounded electronics are typically affected, this basically means all portable electronic devices. Shielding the thickness of 1-2 sheet of foil are acceptable, however it still must be grounded.

Digital circuitry is more prone to be damaged than analog circuitry. The best protection an average home owner can achieve is typically in the form of a home fireproof safe. These are very well shielded and many have a lead liner between the walls. Lead is unique in that it can absorb the emp energy, however ALL OTHER METALS CAN NOT DO SO. Therefore all other metals MUST be GROUNDED so that the energy can be dissipated to earth ground.

Hope this helps. If you have any other questions feel free to ask. I am an electrical engineer and helped design, test, and conduct research on EMP devices in the past.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Big and Daft » Sat Jan 28, 2012 10:11 am

Here is a quote from THIS THREAD:
Bunsen wrote:Answers from a physicist follow:

I'll start with the grounding question, because that's the easiest to answer: Doesn't help a bit. All that matters is that the metal container is conductive and doesn't have gaps (ammo cans are bad at isolating from UHF on up because that rubber gasket only leaves the lid connected to the body at the ends, and that allows radiation in if the wavelength is short enough). If you're concerned about direct lightning hits, then having the can connected to ground could attract lightning to it, especially if it's much above ground level. I'd leave it ungrounded.

The paint can sounds like a great solution for anything small enough to fit inside. Since it's designed to make an airtight seal, you know you have metal-to-metal contact all the way around the edge of the lid. Trash cans aren't very good on that point -- the lid probably only touches the can at a few points, leaving long (also thin, but it's the long part that matters) gaps, so RF can get inside. They, like the ammo cans, will still protect well from low frequencies (such as indirect lightning effects). Insulation on the inside isn't really necessary (the whole point of the Faraday cage is that currents only flow on the outside surface), but I suppose it can't hurt.

Radios are a fine way to test isolation. It's better if you can control the signal strengths involved and have some basis for comparisons, so you can get an idea of how much attenuation the can provides. The point about testing at high frequencies is valid -- in all but a very very few cases, low frequencies will always be better-isolated than high frequencies. The microwave, I think, is one of those few counterexamples -- it's a resonant cavity tuned to one specific frequency (2.45 GHz), and the edges of the door are positioned at natural zero-current areas for that frequency. At any other frequency, the fact that the door isn't electrically connected to the body around most of the edge allows some RF through.

As for what frequencies matter for what sort of threats, it's time for numbers. Starting with the lowest, and therefore easiest for a Faraday cage to handle:
  • Solar flares and resulting geomagnetic storms: Hundredths of a Hz. Complete non-issue for anyone but the guys running the power grid and pipelines. Small risk of surges on the power lines themselves from transformer failures, but absolutely no RF risk (i.e. if it's not plugged in, it doesn't give a damn).
  • Lightning: Mostly below 1 MHz. That means wavelengths of hundreds of meters, so anything that more or less surrounds your electronics will protect from the electromagnetic waves (i.e. the indirect effects that extend hundreds of meters from the strike). Direct hits from the strike itself are nearly impossible to protect against, since a lightning strike can easily blow a hole through something like an ammo can. But those follow conductors, so don't store your Faraday-protected electronics next to that wire running to the old TV antenna on your chimney. For testing in this frequency range, try an AM radio tuned to the strongest station you can find.
  • Nuclear EMP: Worst below 100 MHz, but significant up to several hundred MHz. Wavelengths as short as several inches. This is where things become demanding. Gaps of several inches in length may allow RF to penetrate into a Faraday cage. Making sure the lid contacts the body around its whole circumference, or at least every inch or two, is important. To test isolation for this sort of thing, try at least UHF (FRS/GMRS radios operate around 460-470 MHz, which is a good example).
  • Non-nuclear EMP bomb: Up to several GHz, perhaps tens of GHz. Wavelengths down below an inch. Damn hard to shield against, but short-ranged and, in my opinion, not likely to be seen unless you're on the wrong end of a serious attack from a high-tech power. If you're still concerned about it, then look to absolutely, completely seal your Faraday cage. Consider soldering the lid on to that paint can. Testing at cellphone/wifi frequencies would be a start, but threats could go well beyond that frequency range. There just isn't much consumer hardware that uses frequencies this high.
In fact, there is a lot of good information all the way through the thread - well worth a read.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Frosty709 » Sat Jan 28, 2012 10:20 am

Good info here. Taggin' for future reading.
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by thesupremeking » Sat Jan 28, 2012 10:29 am

do you guys pre wrap all your electronics in tin foil!?
If you don't do you think you'll get enough warning about a CME or EMP to actually carry this out? I'm seriously asking.

I always figured and EMP would catch everyone off guard, as well as CME's, and I'm not about to wrap everything in foil.
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by TheRambler » Sat Jan 28, 2012 10:48 am

I would have to completely disagree with that post. Grounding does indeed help, in fact it helps significantly. Radio transmissions are fine to test the seal of a container, but they don't act in quite the same way, though they are very similar. The whole idea behind shielding, be it a faraday cage or not, is its electrical resistance. A shieled item/container that is not grounded still offers some protection, but that amount of protection goes up astronomically when it is grounded.

The Meissner effect is the best thing(closest thing available to read on the internet that i know of) i can suggest you read about if you want to know why grounding works. The closer you get to 0 resistance the more a magnetic field can be repelled by a material. Thus a good ground is esential in maximizing protection from an EMP. In a true meissner effect a superconductor is needed, however proper grounding gets you as close as realistically possible to 0 resistance.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sat Jan 28, 2012 1:43 pm

My tin foil comment was made "tongue-incheek"- please don't assume I know anything. (Pretend you're my ex-wife for a moment) :lol:
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Bunsen » Sat Jan 28, 2012 3:53 pm

TheRambler wrote:I would have to completely disagree with that post.
And I'm going to have to disagree with pretty much every single part of both of your posts. Not trying to be a dick about it, but you're wrong on just about every factual point, and very confused about the rest.
TheRambler wrote:I am glad this subject came up. I am actually very knowledgable on it. First off, if its a true EMP either from the after effect of a nuke blast, or from another bomb designed to give off an EMP as its primary purpose, or if its just a solar flare etc removing the batteries/unpluging from an item WILL NOT PROTECT IT. An EMP damages circuitry at the component/board level, having power applied to or otherwise available to an item makes no difference.
First off: The after-effects of solar flares abso-farking-lutely cannot damage anything that isn't connected to miles of metal. If it isn't plugged into the grid, and isn't a miles-long pipeline, and isn't outside the Earth's atmosphere, it doesn't freaking care. While removing batteries won't do much, removing antennas from radios is an excellent first step (having something that's designed to collect RF energy attached to your electronics is obviously a bad idea). Also, power lines can act as pretty effective antennas, particularly for VHF and lower frequencies, so removing that connection is also a beginning step. It's all a matter of degrees of protection, and something is better than nothing.
Lead is the best shielding material, however that is usually not a feasible option for most people.
I don't know exactly where you got this idea, but I'm guessing you have nuclear EMPs confused with nuclear (i.e. ionizing, mainly gamma) radiation. They are very, very different things. Lead is popular for shielding from x-ray and gamma radiation because it's cheap and extremely dense, but there's nothing else particularly special about it. Its relatively low conductivity gives it a larger skin depth than other metals, which doesn't help for electromagnetic shielding.
The next best shielding is metal at least 1/4in thick. If it is less than 1/4in thick and you are within roughly 2 miles of the source you will still be affected. After the inital 2 mile radius, the next 'line' is the 6 mile mark. From 2-6miles shielding roughly the thickness of 1/6in is sufficient. The type of metal does not matter, however lead is best.
There are several things wrong with this. It sounds like you're talking about a low-altitude or surface nuclear burst. Those don't produce any significant EMP except deep within the kiss-your-ass-goodbye zone. Unless you're inside a hardened blast shelter, you'll be rather too smashed, scorched, and irradiated to notice that your radio isn't working. Widespread nuclear EMPs come from bursts extremely high in the atmosphere -- we're talking low-Earth-orbit altitudes here, hundreds of miles up. The effects are continent-wide, and they don't weaken very much with distance until you pass the burst's horizon.

Non-nuclear EMP sources (lightning and conventional, engineered EMP bombs) are short-ranged, but generally on the scale of hundreds of feet to hundreds of yards, not several miles, so your guidelines don't really apply to those either.

As for the shielding recommendations, those again sound like you're talking about gamma radiation. A quarter inch of anything is total overkill for RF shielding except at very low frequencies (tens of kHz, maybe?). Such low frequencies don't couple to small circuitry, so there's no reason to worry about them.
THE MAIN THING YOU NEED TO REMEMBER IS THAT WHATEVER SHIELDING YOU ARE USING, IT MUST BE GROUNDED TO EARTH GROUND OR THE EMP CAN NOT BE DISSIPATED. After 6 miles, the next radius is roughly to the 10 mile mark. Only very sensitive electronics will be effected in the 6-10 mile range, such as computers, and other items that use printed circuit boards. shielding for this range is typically around 2-3 sheets of alluminum foil. Past 10 miles only ungrounded electronics are typically affected, this basically means all portable electronic devices. Shielding the thickness of 1-2 sheet of foil are acceptable, however it still must be grounded.
The bit about grounding is simply wrong. Gauss's law does not care if your shielding is grounded, only that it forms a continuous, closed surface. If you don't know what Gauss's law is, or why it applies here, stop giving advice right now because you do not have the background to understand what you're talking about.
Digital circuitry is more prone to be damaged than analog circuitry. The best protection an average home owner can achieve is typically in the form of a home fireproof safe. These are very well shielded and many have a lead liner between the walls. Lead is unique in that it can absorb the emp energy, however ALL OTHER METALS CAN NOT DO SO. Therefore all other metals MUST be GROUNDED so that the energy can be dissipated to earth ground.
I mostly agree about digital stuff being more vulnerable than analog. However, once again, lead is not special. Electromagnetic shielding is not a matter of absorbing energy, but reflecting it. Lead isn't uniquely good at either of those. You want conductivity and lots of it, but that's pretty easy to get from common sheet metals. The tough part is making sure that you don't have gaps with poor or nonexistent connections (like around the lid of a container, or at the door of a safe), so if you're choosing a metal you should go for something that makes good, reliable electrical contacts. Also, I'm pretty sure fire-resistant safes don't use lead in their construction.
Hope this helps. If you have any other questions feel free to ask. I am an electrical engineer and helped design, test, and conduct research on EMP devices in the past.
Okay, I wasn't going to be a dick, but I must have skimmed past this part on my first reading. I'm calling bullshit. There is no way anyone who works with RF could possibly be so entirely clueless about how conductors and electromagnetic waves work. If you actually are an electrical engineer, you are dangerously underqualified and need to quit before you hurt someone.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Bunsen » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:16 pm

TheRambler wrote:Radio transmissions are fine to test the seal of a container, but they don't act in quite the same way, though they are very similar. The whole idea behind shielding, be it a faraday cage or not, is its electrical resistance. A shieled item/container that is not grounded still offers some protection, but that amount of protection goes up astronomically when it is grounded.
An electromagnetic pulse is a short burst of radio-frequency electromagnetic waves. Radio transmissions are radio-frequency electromagnetic waves. As long as your test transmissions are representative of the frequency range you're trying to protect against, your shielding responds to them in exactly the same way. There is no net charge transport to or from protected devices, so grounding is completely irrelevant. From an RF perspective, the ground is just another conducting surface, and connecting your faraday cage to it changes nothing.
The Meissner effect is the best thing(closest thing available to read on the internet that i know of) i can suggest you read about if you want to know why grounding works. The closer you get to 0 resistance the more a magnetic field can be repelled by a material. Thus a good ground is esential in maximizing protection from an EMP. In a true meissner effect a superconductor is needed, however proper grounding gets you as close as realistically possible to 0 resistance.
You're gonna have to explain to this poor condensed matter physicist how the hell grounding has the slightest damn thing to do with a material's expulsion of magnetic fields upon transitioning to a superconducting state. Also, connecting an object to ground has no effect on its own electrical resistance. All a ground connection accomplishes is to keep the object's DC potential at zero. Things inside a faraday cage don't give half a damn what their local potential is, only what the electric field is. A sealed, conductive container has E=0 inside at DC and E~=0 at RF (assuming the absence of radiating gaps and a wall thickness much greater than the skin depth), regardless of what V is. This is first-semester E&M, dude.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by TheRambler » Sat Jan 28, 2012 6:22 pm

I don't want to sit around and argue about all of this, its a pointless endeavor and a waste of everyones time. Especially since i am not knowledgable at all, and know nothing on the subject. Not gonna try to convice you to believe anything I have to say, you can look up actual studies that have been done if you so wish.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by williaty » Sat Jan 28, 2012 6:31 pm

TheRambler wrote:I don't want to sit around and argue about all of this, its a pointless endeavor and a waste of everyones time. Especially since i am not knowledgable at all, and know nothing on the subject. Not gonna try to convice you to believe anything I have to say, you can look up actual studies that have been done if you so wish.
Almost everyone on this forum has looked up the studies and read them in detail. You'll find that most people on this forum are not your typical internet-survialist-noobs. Also, I just read what you've written to the other people literally in the room with me right now. You've got an astro-physicist, a high-energy physicist, an electrical engineer, and and automotive mechanic laughing their asses off at you right now. Yes, even the mechanic knows why you're full of it.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by yelp » Sat Jan 28, 2012 8:45 pm

Tagged with popcorn. Not to be a dick, but this looks like fun.
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Unorthodox » Sat Jan 28, 2012 9:22 pm

TheRambler wrote:I don't want to sit around and argue about all of this, its a pointless endeavor and a waste of everyones time. Especially since i am not knowledgable at all, and know nothing on the subject. Not gonna try to convice you to believe anything I have to say, you can look up actual studies that have been done if you so wish.
WAIT! wait wait wait...so you mean the super thin piece of foil that wraps any bit of electronic guts susceptible to RF interference from from your cellphone, to the Wireless internet card in your laptop is USELESS for protecting against RF frequencies???

I need to shove my cellphone and wireless router in lead to make sure my computer speakers magnets don't cook them??? Or at least 1/4 inch steel something or other??? :gonk:
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Sun Jan 29, 2012 4:43 am

I'd like to chime in here.

HERO. Hazard of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordinance. HERO is defined as the threat to electrically and non-electrically fire ordinance and equipment from electromagnetic radiation. It's also one of the first things I learned about before the .mil let me within pissing distance of a blasting cap. Thing is, the military's been thinking about this EMP hoo-yah for quite sometime, and they are worried about both pulses, pulse weapons, and rapid accumulation, which has a tendency to fire ungrounded ordinance.

So, to prevent electrically fire rockets and sensitive electronics from malfunctioning or "cooking off" due to HERO and EMP (which presents a HERO threat) the solution is simple. Mylar baggies, about .7mil thick, and sealed on all four sides. No grounding, no lead, nothing else. Mylar baggies. Shit works too. Next time you order a small electronic component from some internet company, look at the little baggie it comes in. Sealed mylar. That protected that chip from air travel at 35,000 feet, land travel through rural, urban, and suburban areas, and all the electromagnetic radiation that the trip entails. No ground wires. No lead shielding. No safes.

Just what I've learned both from electronic warfare specialists, and from my own training in How Not To Get Myself Blown Up Or Fry The Radios.
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by Hunter213 » Mon Jan 30, 2012 4:25 am

When speaking of digital circuitry you are usually dealing with RF. therefore yes a Mylar bag will work. But as you said yourself Bunsen, the Rambler seems to be speaking about gamma and x-rays which are also in the electromagnetic spectrum. Know I don't know the techs of your specific arguments but it really depends on which area of the electromagnetic spectrum your talking about. My dealings are mainly in microwaves which are also in the electromagnetic spectrum.
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by williaty » Mon Jan 30, 2012 5:04 am

OK, so about half the people have got their heads on straight and the other half probably just need to hear it in a different way.

Faraday Cages are effective at blocking electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic radiation is everything from radio waves to microwaves, to infrared, to visible light, to ultraviolet light, to x-rays, and gamma rays. That list is ordered from lowest to highest frequency, which is the same thing as saying from largest to smallest wavelength. Now, a Faraday Cage has to form a single, unbroken conductive surface before it'll block EM radiation. The tricky detail is that the definition of "unbroken" is a little squirly. "Unbroken" basically translates to "any holes have to be small enough the EM radiation at that frequency doesn't notice". So this means that the size of the holes you can have in your Faraday Cage depend on the frequency of EM radiation you want to keep out. For radio waves, the holes can be big. Big enough to wriggle a human through. For microwaves, the holes have to be smaller (like the screen you look through on your microwave's door). For light, smaller yet. When you get to x-ray, things get tricky. X-rays have a wavelength on the same scale as the size of an individual atom. A "solid" sheet of metal starts looking an awfully lot like a chain-link fence to an x-ray. Gamma rays are even more of a problem since their wavelength is on the same scale as an atomic nuclei.

Where this comes into play is when you try to make a Faraday Cage to keep something out. The ever-popular steel trash can may be entirely effective at keeping out AM radio waves because the gaps between the lid and body are much smaller than the wavelength of the radio wave. Move up to microwaves and the tiny gaps between the lid and body in different places around the lid are enough to let the can "leak" and it ceases to function as a Faraday cage. With the metalized mylar anti-static bags, the situation is similar. The metal is deposited onto the bag with sufficiently small holes in it to block RF EM, but it visibly isn't acting as a Faraday cage anymore by the time you get up to visible light (since you can see through it). When you're talking about x-rays and gamma rays, a solid sheet of copper starts to look an awfully lot like that translucent mylar bag. At that point, you have to either get a denser material (move the atoms closer together to close the holes) or start resorting to a defense-in-depth.

Where people get even farther off track is when they start to associate a burst of EM radiation with the "radiation" from a nuclear bomb (or a nuke accident). When we use the catch-all term "radiation" to describe the bad things from a nuke, we're simultaneously talking about EM radiation (it's x-ray and gamma that we mostly "worry" about, but everything gets emitted) AND particle radiation in the forms of alpha and beta particles. Since the alpha and beta particles are not EM radiation, a Faraday cage doesn't do anything to them (well, it's a little more complicated than that with how easy alpha is to block), so you have to resort to the defense-in-depth strategy.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by funkychicken » Mon Jan 30, 2012 3:54 pm

So...(putting down my popcorn) I think my question is the same as the op's. Can I protect my electronics from an emp/cme on a budget? or should I by a bunch of bags from these guys [urlhttp://techprotectbag.com/][/url] and believe what they say which is,"There has never been an easier way to protect your critical electronics. EMP Bags are designed to protect against damaging EMP current. One cannot predict the size, strength, or proximity of an EMP, but by using our bags, electronics should be protected. It is our highest recommendation that you “nest” items inside multiple layers of protection for best results. This can be achieved by double bagging(buying more of our bags) or storing your EMP bags inside a metal container(altoids tin?). More layers = more protection.
Shop Now" I believe this just as much as I do that If I give some Yahoo 100k per a person that "I too, can have a spot in the end of days bunker". A bunker that I can't see or visit until right before said "end of days" Sounds like I'm in the wrong business, after an emp or cme that destroys all my electronics how will I write a review or complain to the company that sold me the "EMP Proof bags"? My Cell and Computer are dead. Guess there is always Snail Mail. :lol:
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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by williaty » Mon Jan 30, 2012 4:46 pm

Let's get one thing out of the discussion: Don't even worry about CME. Unless you're the power company, you simply don't have a large enough continuous piece of metal to be zapped by a CME. Yes, even if you have something plugged into the wall socket. Yes, during a very large solar storm, many things that communicate via RF are going to be entirely disrupted. However, they'll start working again just fine as soon as the noise goes away. Your real prep-issue related to CMEs is the grid being down for an extended period. Your personal electronics are going to be just fine.

As far as protecting things on a budget, I think it's possible, but there's one thing I'm not sure where to source. So, basically, you just need to weld up a box out of sheet metal and, hey presto, EMP protection. The difficulty comes with the lid. It has to be in perfect continuous electrical contact with the body of the box. For research installations, they make a product that's effectively metal-mesh weatherstripping to seal doors. If you lined that around the seal between the lid and box, you'd be golden. I don't know where to buy that stuff though.

Double-bagging doesn't help anything other than the vendor's wallet.

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Re: Questions about cheap EMP and CME protection.

Post by funkychicken » Mon Jan 30, 2012 5:44 pm

williaty wrote:Double-bagging doesn't help anything other than the vendor's wallet.
+1
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