Guerilla Gardens

Discuss lifestyle changes to better survive disasters. This category is for topics pertaining to being self reliant such as DIY, farming, alternative energy, autonomous solutions to water collection and waste removal, etc.

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Ad'lan
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Post by Ad'lan » Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:10 pm

Hemp, makes very nice cloth and Rope. I've used it for bowstrings in the past, takes the wax nicely.
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Post by meanstreak » Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:03 pm

Outlander wrote:For growing potatoes one slick method is planting them in a large garbage can. Put a good soil mix in the bottom of the can and plant your seedling. Once the potatoes starts growing keep adding dirt around the plant while it grows. By the end of the summer the can should be full of dirt and hopefully potatoes.
Do you just keep covering the new plants as they grow?
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Post by Bubba Enfield » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:25 pm

meanstreak wrote:
Outlander wrote:For growing potatoes one slick method is planting them in a large garbage can. Put a good soil mix in the bottom of the can and plant your seedling. Once the potatoes starts growing keep adding dirt around the plant while it grows. By the end of the summer the can should be full of dirt and hopefully potatoes.
Do you just keep covering the new plants as they grow?
As the plant grows, you periodically add more soil around the stem, leaving the leaves exposed. The plant will keep growing taller, producing more potatoes along the buried stem.
Prioritize your health. Get out of debt. Grow food.

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Post by Zamboni » Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:24 pm

There is a chapter in the book What If? 2 about the potato and how it has altered the history of Western civilisation. It said that potatoes saved the civilians of Europe during the Napoleanic Wars. Some armies (notably Napolean's) lived off of the land, which is a nice way to say that they took all of their food from the people who they were invading. Potatoes would always be missed by the invading or retreating armies when they were left in the ground and the people would have at least them to eat when the armies left. Basically, they geurilla gardened.

I don't know why I decided to share that, but I did.
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Post by phoenixmastm » Tue Jan 29, 2008 12:44 am

Bubba Enfield wrote:
meanstreak wrote:
Outlander wrote:For growing potatoes one slick method is planting them in a large garbage can. Put a good soil mix in the bottom of the can and plant your seedling. Once the potatoes starts growing keep adding dirt around the plant while it grows. By the end of the summer the can should be full of dirt and hopefully potatoes.
Do you just keep covering the new plants as they grow?
As the plant grows, you periodically add more soil around the stem, leaving the leaves exposed. The plant will keep growing taller, producing more potatoes along the buried stem.
That sounds like something I'm gonna do as a summer project. :D

Recycling bins go for cheap around here, so a container wont be a problem. Now, should I grow from seeds or seedlings?
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Post by solliz » Tue Jan 29, 2008 1:40 am

phoenixmastm wrote:
Bubba Enfield wrote:
meanstreak wrote:
Outlander wrote:For growing potatoes one slick method is planting them in a large garbage can. Put a good soil mix in the bottom of the can and plant your seedling. Once the potatoes starts growing keep adding dirt around the plant while it grows. By the end of the summer the can should be full of dirt and hopefully potatoes.
Do you just keep covering the new plants as they grow?
As the plant grows, you periodically add more soil around the stem, leaving the leaves exposed. The plant will keep growing taller, producing more potatoes along the buried stem.
That sounds like something I'm gonna do as a summer project. :D

Recycling bins go for cheap around here, so a container wont be a problem. Now, should I grow from seeds or seedlings?
That's what I was thinking. This sounds like a great idea.

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Post by Moana Drifter » Tue Jan 29, 2008 6:22 pm

So, do you potato growers bother buying "seed" potatoes, or just chop up something from the grocery store?

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Post by Gauge » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:08 pm

Ad'lan wrote:Hemp, makes very nice cloth and Rope. I've used it for bowstrings in the past, takes the wax nicely.
Its also illegal to grow in the united states because it looks too similar to marijuana.

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Post by Bubba Enfield » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:11 pm

Moana Drifter wrote:So, do you potato growers bother buying "seed" potatoes, or just chop up something from the grocery store?
I always buy seed potatoes. I've never tried planting a store-bought potatoe, but I've heard that they may have been treated to prevent or retard sprouting. Seed potatoes are cheap, anyway. If you've never grown them before, you're in for a treat! When I planted my first garden, I didn't even know what the potatoe plants were going to look like, or when they would be ready to eat. One day my cousin was visiting, and said "Hey, you can eat baby potatoes now" and showed me how to pull out some small ones while leaving the plant to grow the rest big. Baby potatoes from your own garden, boiled and eaten with butter, is the best eating there is IMO. Be careful, though, you can end up liking them enough that you cut into your storage crop.
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Post by Moana Drifter » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:27 pm

Bubba Enfield wrote:
Moana Drifter wrote:So, do you potato growers bother buying "seed" potatoes, or just chop up something from the grocery store?
I always buy seed potatoes. I've never tried planting a store-bought potatoe, but I've heard that they may have been treated to prevent or retard sprouting.
I've always heard that, but the grocery store bought ones don't seem to have any trouble sprouting in the pantry if we don't eat them fast enough. Perhaps an experiment is in order.

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Post by Apollo-11 » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:34 pm

Bubba Enfield wrote:
Moana Drifter wrote:So, do you potato growers bother buying "seed" potatoes, or just chop up something from the grocery store?
I always buy seed potatoes. I've never tried planting a store-bought potatoe, but I've heard that they may have been treated to prevent or retard sprouting. Seed potatoes are cheap, anyway. If you've never grown them before, you're in for a treat! When I planted my first garden, I didn't even know what the potatoe plants were going to look like, or when they would be ready to eat. One day my cousin was visiting, and said "Hey, you can eat baby potatoes now" and showed me how to pull out some small ones while leaving the plant to grow the rest big. Baby potatoes from your own garden, boiled and eaten with butter, is the best eating there is IMO. Be careful, though, you can end up liking them enough that you cut into your storage crop.
Oh yeah. I love baby reds. They are yummy boiled and covered with butter...

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I had a potato as a house plant once, to prove that it could be done. I just cut a potato in half that had already started to sprout. Plant it cut side down. I didn't harvest any potatoes from that houseplant, because I had inadequate drainage and they rotted.

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Post by Murphy Slaw » Wed Jan 30, 2008 12:46 am

Growing your own is always better! I've grown potatoes in the ground, in tires and in mounds of straw and newspaper.

I'd be sure to get them enough light if I were to grow them in a trashcan though. If it was a tall can, there would be little light reaching the bottom. Perhaps a grow light on the top to supplement, or even try a large tupperware tub instead...

You can get them to grow from the store bought eatin' taters, or from 'special' seed potatoes. I have had better luck with the ones bought specifically for planting though...

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Post by MarkTBSc » Wed Jan 30, 2008 4:14 am

Bubba Enfield wrote: Baby potatoes from your own garden, boiled and eaten with butter, is the best eating there is IMO. Be careful, though, you can end up liking them enough that you cut into your storage crop.
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Post by phoenixmastm » Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:35 am

Moana Drifter wrote:
Bubba Enfield wrote:
Moana Drifter wrote:So, do you potato growers bother buying "seed" potatoes, or just chop up something from the grocery store?
I always buy seed potatoes. I've never tried planting a store-bought potatoe, but I've heard that they may have been treated to prevent or retard sprouting.
I've always heard that, but the grocery store bought ones don't seem to have any trouble sprouting in the pantry if we don't eat them fast enough. Perhaps an experiment is in order.
Tell ya what, in the summer, I'm gonna do up 2 bins, 1 with seed potatoes, the other with store bought ones cut up and see how it goes. :D

ETA: Just got off the phone with the mother, we're gonna give this a shot as soon as it starts getting warmer. :D

Another question: What does the soil have to be like for taters to grow? We're gonna try and grow the big brown guys that are great for baking, and I'd appreciate it if anyone can tell me what the soil has to be like. My ma says they have to be grown in relatively sandy soil, is this true?
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Post by Bubba Enfield » Wed Jan 30, 2008 10:19 am

Ya, they'll do better in soil that runs more to sand than clay. The tubers are growing underground, so the looser the better. If your soil tends more to clay, start amending with something (sand, compost, peatmoss, leaves/paper shreds, anything). And mulch over the soil to prevent it from clumping. Also, set up your garden so that you never have to walk on your soil.
Prioritize your health. Get out of debt. Grow food.

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Post by Rock2Fox » Thu Mar 06, 2008 12:40 am

Found a good GP site about planting veggies. Mmmm....veggies....

http://www.thegardenhelper.com/vegtips.html
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Post by dogbane » Thu Mar 06, 2008 11:35 am

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Post by El_Dickman » Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:18 pm

A few things pop to mind when it comes to "stealth gardening":

1) Asparagus. No kidding. Once a patch of this stuff is entrenched it is a zero maintenance crop. I used to ride around the irrigation canals around my house to harvest asparagus when I was young.

2) I second the idea of fruit-bearing bushes like blackberries, etc. But instead of going stealth with it if you are in a neighborhood they probably have a committee that does the decorative gardens around the streets. A little time spent there may get your bushes installed and maintained by the committee.

3) Mint. Yeah, not well known as something to eat but life is more than that. Makes a nice tea and can be used to freshen up when you can't get a decent shower.

Planting invasive species may get you in trouble. And depending on the species may be a really crappy thing to do to your neighbors. What was that old joke? "How do you plant kudzu? Throw it and run!"
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Post by Moana Drifter » Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:20 pm

dogbane wrote:How does one go about employing gorillas for gardening, may I ask? Might other, smaller apes perform as well, the bonobo for example?
Sure, as long as you're not growing anything really big like pumpkins, although chimps and tomatoes are a bad combination. The food fights are a sight to behold.

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Post by velojym » Thu Mar 06, 2008 2:28 pm

We started a bunch of seeds about three days ago, and the garden greens are already sprouting. Whooo! We're also getting some action in the Beefsteak tomatoes.
After we're pretty sure there won't be another freeze, I'll put up the raised bed and we'll plant everything else.
I need to get some seed potato cuts, and some sweet potato ones, too.
We're going to do a telescoping bed for both of those.
I'd also like to line the chain link divider fence with berry bushes, though I think we may hold off on the fruit trees for another season.

We're not going to employ any simian help this season, either. If anyone has good luck with it, keep us informed.


edit: The onions are sprouting now, too! Woot!
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Post by Squirrley » Thu Mar 06, 2008 4:54 pm

I know that at least around here, lots of the medians in streets have little garden type areas. Apparently you can 'adopt' one, like the adopt a highway thing, and woooo free garden space! I'm not sure how good they'd be for growing small vegetable gardens, but its better than nothing I guess. You might look into that.
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Post by brer » Thu Mar 13, 2008 7:04 am

Try a bit of root crops that no one eats generally and wouldnt recognize as edible.

Leeks, parsnips,turnips. sweet potatoes,yams. sugar beets, beets,carrots etc

Peanuts, field peas to cover legumes.

Amaranth and sorgum/milo come to mind because they produce loads of high protein seeds.

You can buy turnip seed by the pound at a feed store. Ditto field peas and sorgum. High gain is an industrial form of milo that produces loads of seeds and can also be bought in bulk.

Some hunting websites will sell sugar beat seeds in quantity.

A small plot of turnips from a handful of seeds, will provide a great deal of food, if the critters dont get them first.
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Post by Steve » Mon Mar 17, 2008 2:57 pm

So I planted my first Guerilla Garden last night. Thanks for all the advice. I decided to try potatoes as a clandestine crop. I’ve been looking for locations for the garden and this has been the hardest part. The open areas around here get mowed semi-frequently and the wooded areas have too much shade. But yesterday I found the perfect spot while driving around. It’s about 20 acres and the field is mostly open with some trees. The weeds are really high – like 8 feet tall. It looks like it hasn’t been cleared for 10 years. I don’t think there is any chance of this property getting developed – and if it does, oh well. The guerilla garden is just a third string insurance policy to my preps and backyard garden.

I left the house last night with a backpack filled with some manure, a couple gallons of water, and potato pieces I had cut a few days before. I walked about a hundred paces into the field starting from a light post to give me a reference point. To my amazement I found what looked like a short fire break. I cleared the few weeds from the cut and then dug up the first foot of dirt and piled it along one side of the trench. I then went back with the shovel and loosened up the dirt in the bottom of the trench. It was really easy digging because it’s really sandy soil – unlike my backyard garden just a half mile away. To plant each spud I dug a hole about 3 inches deep, took a handful of manure and dumped it in there with some water, and then gently covered it back up. I spaced the plants about a foot apart. I’ll come back in a month or so and cover the plants up with the rest of the dirt from the trench (I’m trying this trick in my backyard garden.) I might go out again soon and get some more potatoes in the ground because it’s such a great location.
Today I didn't even have to use my A.K.
I got to say it was a good day.

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Post by Doryman » Fri Mar 21, 2008 7:28 pm

Moana Drifter wrote:
dogbane wrote:How does one go about employing gorillas for gardening, may I ask? Might other, smaller apes perform as well, the bonobo for example?
Sure, as long as you're not growing anything really big like pumpkins, although chimps and tomatoes are a bad combination. The food fights are a sight to behold.
Fertilizing the crops is just as easy. Simply start a fight and get out of the way...





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