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PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2017 8:19 pm 
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After becoming fed up with tarps and other such things over the last Winter, I resolved to build a woodshed.

My property is sloped (good for drainage, bad for building stuff), so I had to build it on stilts. I dug three trenches and filled them with gravel, then framed out the floor on piers.
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After that I did a standard 3/4" plywood floor.
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The frame for the roof is mostly made of 4"X4"s.
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The roof is built from 1/2" plywood and 12' 2"X6"s.
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I installed your basic tarpaper and shingle roof.
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After putting up some fence planks to keep the rain off and staining it, I'm done:
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 2:05 pm 
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Slick looking. Thanks for the photos.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:45 pm 
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Great job!

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 8:52 pm 
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Thanks for all the positive comments. I should've mentioned that I started by looking at these plans, although the finished product is very different: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/fi ... iagram.pdf

If anybody knows how to keep your firewood dry it'd be some folks who live on the tip of the Olympic peninsula.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:38 pm 
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Looks great!

While I know there are many considerations required for keeping firewood dry (like airflow), I am woefully uninformed in this subject. Can you go into some of the considerations or limitations you had to keep in mind when constructing your woodshed? Are there specific desirable features you made sure you included in the build?

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 12:30 am 
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You pretty much hit the nail on the head - you want to keep the rain off it but also allow it to breathe.
In the research I did before I built the thing people kept mentioning having a 2' overhang on the front side. I went with a little bit more than that to be on the safe side. A week or two ago we got almost two inches of rain one day (temperate rain forest), and everything stayed dry.
The fence slats have the spaces between them so that air can flow through but the majority of the rain is kept off the wood. This seems to be a very common design here, pretty much every woodshed I've seen is built that way.
As an aside, a few years ago my wife got me the book Norwegian Wood. It has lots of information about wood heat, as well as interesting stories about various people the author met. I can't exactly call it a prepping book in the literal sense of the word, but if you are using wood heat you pretty much have to be prepping simply because of the need to gather and store a large amount of the stuff.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 3:17 pm 
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Zembecowicz wrote:
You pretty much hit the nail on the head - you want to keep the rain off it but also allow it to breathe.
In the research I did before I built the thing people kept mentioning having a 2' overhang on the front side. I went with a little bit more than that to be on the safe side. A week or two ago we got almost two inches of rain one day (temperate rain forest), and everything stayed dry.
The fence slats have the spaces between them so that air can flow through but the majority of the rain is kept off the wood. This seems to be a very common design here, pretty much every woodshed I've seen is built that way.
As an aside, a few years ago my wife got me the book Norwegian Wood. It has lots of information about wood heat, as well as interesting stories about various people the author met. I can't exactly call it a prepping book in the literal sense of the word, but if you are using wood heat you pretty much have to be prepping simply because of the need to gather and store a large amount of the stuff.

Awesome, thanks for the info!


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:02 am 
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Nice work. I built mine similarly. If I recall correctly I got my basic design info from a solid fuel heating book from a guy based in New England. But yeah the basics are the same wherever it rains I guess - keep the water off and allow it to breathe.

Most of the guys around here (mostly talking about outdoor boilers) just literally pile their wood (not stacking), often right up against a building, without splitting, not seasoned, etc. This is the basic reason their boilers smoke like a coal fired locomotive giving wood heat a bad name. Of course these are the same knuckleheads that burn railroad ties.

Do you know the capacity? I believe mine is 5 cords stuffed to the gills.

Thanks for posting.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 1:26 pm 
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Thanks for the compliment.
If I did my math right it holds six cords.
Pretty much everybody has wood heat up here. Some folks have propane tanks and you will still come across the odd oil burner here and there. It rains a lot more than in the lower elevations because storms hit the mountain side, so pretty much everybody pays some level of attention to keeping their wood dry.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 1:31 pm 
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I don't use the fireplace all that often so I don't need the wood. I have about 2 cords stacked back in the treeline from a tree I took down but it is mostly a backstop for my archery targets. (Dang if that wood don't break down fast exposed to the elements.)

Still, thanks for a thread with a good explanation and graphics. Stuff like this can be used by a lot of folks when they come searching.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 11:20 pm 
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I have a masonry fireplace in addition to my stove. The thing is all but useless as a heat source. I burn lumber scraps in it, but I don't waste good firewood on it.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 7:59 pm 
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That's cool man. My Dad would be jealous. My parents live on a smallholding and he's built something off the back of the carport.

Like you say, it's all about letting the wood breathe.

You can by a moisture gauge to test moisture levels inside the wood. If I remember rightly, the last guy that dumped a truck load said under 20% is fine.

We've managed to cut trees and get less than 20% within 6 months...others have taken 2 years.


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