Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

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modustollens
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Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by modustollens » Thu Jun 23, 2016 8:28 am

Ran across an interesting you-tube channel. A guy is demonstrating 18th century cooking techniques and recipes.

Given that, if the zombies come, we survivors will still need to eat something other than brains and that modern infrastructure and prepared food will get scarce, some of the older techniques could be useful again.

This recipe for Portable Soup is pretty cool - allowing one to make a portable and preservable meat by-product akin to a modern day OXO cube - from what he says it sounds like this portable soup was pretty common a couple centuries ago:



There are a lot other recipes too - hard tack, egg preservation techniques, pemmican, for example.

Guns and knives are glamorous and catchy I suppose; but as we have seen in Alone, he who eats, wins (provided they don't go crazy first or run out of the woods scared for lack of a gun).

MT
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by ZombieGranny » Thu Jun 23, 2016 11:15 am

Ooh lovely videos, thank you.
Bookmarked the site.
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by Anianna » Thu Jun 23, 2016 11:31 am

Is that his real name? That's awesome, all things considered.

Love the videos! Excellent find! Thanks for sharing!
Feed science, not zombies!

Failure is the path of least persistence.

“People had more than they needed. We had no idea what was precious and what wasn't. We threw away things people kill each other for now.” ~Book of Eli

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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by modustollens » Thu Jun 23, 2016 12:43 pm

Anianna wrote:Is that his real name? That's awesome, all things considered.

Love the videos! Excellent find! Thanks for sharing!
I think his name is James; not sure why he has Jas.? Maybe that's a short form; or, perhaps, someone already owned his domain name in full? Or perhaps I misunderstood you and you are not asking about Jas.?

Anyway, I think I might try making this 'portable soup' - I have a couple canoe trips coming up this summer - that portable soup should make for a good broth for a bean soup...

MT
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by shulatt » Thu Jun 23, 2016 1:05 pm

Jas. was a common appropriate abbreviation for James for 18th century documents

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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by Anianna » Thu Jun 23, 2016 1:32 pm

modustollens wrote:
Anianna wrote:Is that his real name? That's awesome, all things considered.

Love the videos! Excellent find! Thanks for sharing!
I think his name is James; not sure why he has Jas.? Maybe that's a short form; or, perhaps, someone already owned his domain name in full? Or perhaps I misunderstood you and you are not asking about Jas.?

Anyway, I think I might try making this 'portable soup' - I have a couple canoe trips coming up this summer - that portable soup should make for a good broth for a bean soup...

MT
I already make our own broth, so I am definitely trying this. It should be awesome for hiking and camping.

As for the name, I thought it was awesome because he is posting historical period material and his name is JAMES TOWNsend. :wink:
Feed science, not zombies!

Failure is the path of least persistence.

“People had more than they needed. We had no idea what was precious and what wasn't. We threw away things people kill each other for now.” ~Book of Eli

∩(=^_^=)

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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by ZombieGranny » Thu Jun 23, 2016 3:10 pm

I tried it once years ago, works well.
My broth is usually cloudier than in the video (due to adding lemon juice in order to leach calcium from the bones).
Current safety stuff probably says it's a no-no; but I was careful to keep it hot enough, then stuck it in the fridge overnight to congeal before drying it.
In my day, we didn't have virtual reality.
If a one-eyed razorback barbarian warrior was chasing you with an ax, you just had to hope you could outrun him.
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by TacAir » Thu Jun 23, 2016 7:49 pm

Old school, indeed

23 Mar 1850
New Article of Food - Meat Biscuit.

Some time since we noticed a new kind of Meat Biscuit, or “Portable Desiccated Soup Bread,” invented by Mr. Gail Borden, Jr., a highly respectable citizen of Galveston, Texas. The discovery being fully secured by a patent recently granted, we will give a brief but clear description of it, as it is an invention of the first importance, both to our own country, and it may be said, to the whole human race. The nature of this discovery consists in preserving the concentrated nutritious properties of flesh meat of any kind, combining it with flour and baking it into biscuits. One pound of this bread contains the extract of more than five pounds of the best meat—(containing its usual proportion of bone)—and one ounce of it will make a pint of rich soup. Biscuits by Mr. Borden’s process may be made of beef, veal, fowl's flesh, oysters, &c., and thus in a compact form the very essence of agricultural products, fitted for the traveller or mariner, or for the dwellers in distant cities, may be transported by sea or land, from distant rural districts, where flesh meat is comparatively cheap.

In a letter to Dr. Ashbel Smith, Mr. Borden thus relates the way he made this discovery:

"I was endeavoring to make some portable meat glue (the common kind known) for some friends who were going to California—I had set up a large kettle and evaporating pan, and after two days labour I reduced one hundred and twenty pounds of veal to ten pounds of extract, of a consistence like melted glue and molasses; the weather was warm and rainy, it being the middle of July. I could not dry it either in or out of the house, and unwilling to lose my labour, it occured to me, after various expedients, to mix the article with good flour and bake it. To my great satisfaction, the bread was found to contain all the primary principles of meat, and with a better flavor than simple veal soup, thickened with flour in the ordinary method.

This process of mixing and baking, I found to be easily and quickly done, and to answer the double purpose of concentrating in the same cake, the nutritious properties of animal and vegetable food, so essential to the healthful sustenance of man. This extract of animal flesh may also be combined with corn, or other vegetable meal, and for some marine purposes, I intend to employ the potato and other ascorbutic vegetables, having farinaceous qualities, to desiccate he extract."

Dr. Smith., a gentleman of scientific reputation, has communicated a paper on the subject to Prof. Bache, President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He says,—" I have several times eaten of the soup made of this meat biscuit,” and thus describes the manner of making it:

“The nutritive portions of beef or other meat, immediately on its being slaughtered, are, by long boiling, separated from the bones and fibrous and cartilaginous matters: the water holding the nutritious matters in solution, is evaporated to a considerable degree of spissitude—this is then made into a dough with firm wheaten flour, the dough rolled and cut into a form of biscuits, is then desiccated, or baked in an oven at a moderate heat. The cooking, both of the flour and the animal food, is thus complete. The meat biscuits thus prepared have the appearance and firmness of the nicest crackers or navy bread, being as dry, and breaking or pulverizing as readily as the most carefully made table crackers. It is preserved in the form of biscuit, or reduced to coarse flour or meal. It is best kept in tin cases hermetically soldered up ; the exclusion of air is not important, humidity alone is to be guarded against.

I have seen some of the biscuit perfectly fresh and sound that have been hanging in sacks since last July in Mr. Borden’s kitchen: and it is to be borne in mind, that in this climate articles contract moisture and moulder promptly, unless kept dry by artificial heat.

For making soup of the meat biscuit, a batter is first made of the pulverized biscuit and cold water—this is stirred into boilling water—the boiling is continued some ten or twenty minutes—salt, pepper, and other condiments are added to suit the taste, and the soup is ready for the table. I have eaten the soup several times,—it has the fresh, lively, clean, and thoroughly done or cooked flavor that used to form the charm of the soups of the Rocher de Cancale. It is perfectly free from that vapid unctuous stale taste which characterizes all prepared soups I have heretofore tried at sea and elsewhere. Those chemical changes in food which, in common language, we denominate cooking, have been perfectly effected in Mr. Borden’s biscuit by the long continued boiling at first, and the subsequent baking or roasting. The soup prepared of it is thus ready to be absorbed into the system without loss, and without tedious digestion in the alimentary canal, and is in the highest degree nutritious and invigorating.

The paramount excellence of Mr. B.’s discovery, appears to me to consist in this, that it is a meat biscuit—it is meat and bread.—Human life may be sustained, as we all know, on a diet of a single kind, but the highest degree of corporeal and mental strength and health can long be maintained only by the use of both vegetable and animal food; especially when labors, fatigues and privations are to be undergone. I believe there does not exist in nature or art the same amount of nutriment in as small bulk or weight, and as well adapted to support, efficiently and permanently, mental and physical vigor, as is concentrated in the meat biscuit in question. One ounce of the biscuit meal makes a pint of rich, invigorating animal and farinaceous soup by its combination with water, all the requirements of a good food are answered, animal and vegetable aliment in a sufficient bulky form.

We publish the remarks of Dr. Smith, as explanative of the process of making it, and to show the opinion of a scientific man on the subject. We have also partaken of this soup bread, and consider it to be a most excellent discovery, one invaluable to the geologist, surveyor, traveller and voyager. Two pounds of it will supply one man for a week, and fourteen pounds will support him for a month. It provides the means of making the journey through the wilderness, to the promised land on the borders of the Pacific, comparatively easy.

From: Scientific American, Vol. 5, No. 27, 213. (source)
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by modustollens » Thu Jun 23, 2016 8:56 pm

Anianna wrote:
As for the name, I thought it was awesome because he is posting historical period material and his name is JAMES TOWNsend. :wink:
Ahh - that explains why I got your point wrong- I don't think this was covered in my Canadian history classes ;).
Last edited by modustollens on Thu Jun 23, 2016 9:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by modustollens » Thu Jun 23, 2016 8:58 pm

TacAir wrote:Old school, indeed

23 Mar 1850
New Article of Food - Meat Biscuit.
A nice read; thanks; contemporary writing is not as elegant as that I am afraid to report...

MT
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by TacAir » Fri Jun 24, 2016 1:34 am

modustollens wrote:
TacAir wrote:Old school, indeed

23 Mar 1850
New Article of Food - Meat Biscuit.
A nice read; thanks; contemporary writing is not as elegant as that I am afraid to report...

MT
LOL
They got paid by the word - ya know?
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by Anianna » Fri Jun 24, 2016 11:44 am

modustollens wrote:
Anianna wrote:
As for the name, I thought it was awesome because he is posting historical period material and his name is JAMES TOWNsend. :wink:
Ahh - that explains why I got your point wrong- I don't think this was covered in my Canadian history classes ;).
I live right near Jamestown (as well as Yorktown and Williamsburg) which are all historical tourist attractions these days and spent a good chunk of my school days in Virginia schools. Not surprising that it sticks with me and would be a little obscure to others. It is a neat name to have for a guy into history.
Feed science, not zombies!

Failure is the path of least persistence.

“People had more than they needed. We had no idea what was precious and what wasn't. We threw away things people kill each other for now.” ~Book of Eli

∩(=^_^=)

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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by quazi » Wed Jul 06, 2016 4:16 am

I'll (hopefully) be butchering a bunch of chickens next weekend. I think I'll try this.

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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by Asymetryczna » Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:57 am

Nice. Also, carry a soup stone.
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Re: Portable Soup...18th Century Cooking

Post by zombieguineapig » Wed Jul 06, 2016 10:14 am

Ah woah! I'd love to give this a shot.

yum yum :) :rofl:

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