DIY Homebuilding.

Discuss lifestyle changes to better survive disasters. This category is for topics pertaining to being self reliant such as DIY, farming, alternative energy, autonomous solutions to water collection and waste removal, etc.

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

Post Reply
User avatar
roOism
* * * * *
Posts: 1154
Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:18 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later
Location: Somewhere cold.

DIY Homebuilding.

Post by roOism » Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:29 am

Hey all, been lurking for a while.

So I'm planning on moving back up to SE Idaho sometime this spring. I've got some friends that have been like family to me for years. Myself and two brothers are all at a point where we're looking to get some land, build a home, and start investing heavily in emergency prep/food storage/self-sufficient living. I was chatting with the two and their respective wives, and the subject came up of everybody buying in to a big chunk of land where we could all build homes, and have a big central garden/workshop/chicken coop and what not (also perhaps a Halo gaming arena....). Everyone thought it would be a very cool idea. We're all very close and very like-minded individuals, and I don't foresee any big problems with the lot of us sharing land and resources.

So with that in mind, I've been looking wishing dreaming about building a house, and have been reading into energy efficient building materials, recycled material, and what not. I worked in one construction field or another for several years, and have done a little of everything; drywall, framing, painting, electricity, roofing, etc... I worked as a sub-contractor for a few years remodeling and doing finish work on manufactured homes, and have done extensive remodeling on my family residences over the years.

I've known a few people who have undertaken building their own homes, some have been successful, some literally burnt their homes down halfway through the process. Given my moderate amount of experience, I'm wondering how much of the home building process I could tackle myself. Laying the foundation and the initial plumbing are out of my scope of knowledge, but I'm convinced there's not much else I wouldn't be able to accomplish myself and possibly with the help of the aforementioned brothers.

I've seen lots of posts here on people who've done extensive remodeling, which is always great to see. I'm wondering if anyone out there has actually undertaken building a home from the ground up, or at least a significant portion of it. I've been browsing the interwebs on the subject, but haven't found much more than basic workflow principles and some remodeling stuff.

If anyone could recommend some literature, share some wisdom, or slap me with the fish of reality, I'd be grateful.


On a slightly related note, does anyone have an opinion on corrugated metal siding? I love the look, not sure as to its durability/economic factor, but I just think it's cool. (This taken from the freecabinporn.com site, which has claimed my soul for the last few days).
http://25.media.tumblr.com/130482567d01 ... 1_1280.jpg
"Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must." - Goethe

User avatar
KYZHunters
* * * * *
Posts: 1367
Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2007 10:47 pm
Location: Kentucky

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by KYZHunters » Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:45 am

Roo,
My comment has nothing to do with building a house, but a warning about setting this up legally. Problems will probably not occur with your current friends and families but the next generation. I've got a co-worker who is 1/17th owner of a primo 5 acre property in Hawaii with a big house dating back to the 20's. Once grandpa died and willed it to the kids and grandkids all hell broke lose. Several 'owners' treat the beautiful home as a flop house for them, their friends and relations. Two have hauled trailers on to the property and use it as a squat. No one wants to pay taxes or upkeep and one aunt managed to take out a half-million dollar loan using the property as security. It is in court right now and it looks like everyone will lose everything and my co-worker is afraid that she is going to be on the hook for her 'share' of the bad debt.
My only advice is that to avoid heartache in the future, the deed needs to be rock solid and there needs to be a legal agreement between all parties about what happens if someone quits the project, croaks or falls into debt. A lawyer can tell you best how to do this, but I'm thinking something like a trust with an executor solely responsible for managing the property.
I hope you don't take this as an insult to your friends or family, but you can't count on their kids or crazy ex-spouses to do anything in your best interest.
Sorry to be a downer.
crypto wrote:It's not that you were being "harsh" so much as a "douchebag".

User avatar
roOism
* * * * *
Posts: 1154
Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:18 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later
Location: Somewhere cold.

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by roOism » Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:55 am

Thanks for the advice, no insult taken. Future generation stuff was admittedly not at the forefront of my thinking for this. That is definitely something I will give consideration to when discussing this further with them. Cheers.
"Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must." - Goethe

User avatar
Tater Raider
* * * * *
Posts: 6737
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2010 8:53 pm
Location: Meatworld

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by Tater Raider » Wed Dec 19, 2012 5:40 am

To back what KYZ said, I'm hunting for a home and one of the things foremost in my mind is, "Can the kids move this place after I die?" I mean a hobbit style home has all sorts of appeal to me but would be hard to resell.

Make sure your permits are in order, that inspections get done when mandated during construction, and that methods and materials used meet or exceed the building code. You might also look into having the construction done up until the house is sealed and doing the less-critical finishing work yourself - it avoids most of the code issues/headaches during construction and will get you a better home for your dollar as it's the finishing work that can drive the cost of the home up the most.

Were I up for it I'd take over after the drywall was in - house has walls, roof, insulation, plumbing, subfloor, etc. in and just needs floors, cabinets, paint, covers on the outlets, toilets and sinks, and so on, handyman-type stuff (floors would be a step above handyman but you get the idea) that you could tackle one room at a time if needs be and allow for a higher quality (read, more expensive and bigger resale value) finish at the same cost as having a crew do it.

User avatar
the_alias
ZS Global Moderator
ZS Global Moderator
Posts: 5962
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 7:51 pm
Location: Not Here.

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by the_alias » Wed Dec 19, 2012 5:52 am

Regarding the recycled building. There are some threads and I think a ZS member (I want to say doc66 or paladin1 :? ) has described his experience of seeing the Earthship structures up close.

I saw an interesting documentary about the battle they fought in New Mexico to live free and build what they wanted, it has some nice ideas in it - maybe good for an evening viewing with a beverage of choice. Bit political in places and he is quite a character http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrMJwIedrWU" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

If you want to look into underground construction there are also some good threads. This book is considered a classic http://www.undergroundhousing.com/book.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; and there are some youtube vids of his original place in Idaho.

KYZ's comment has a lot of wisdom in it, setting out framework on ownership for everyone and next generations is important. I've seen this from a first hand perspective as well.
Man is a beast of prey

RoneKiln
* * *
Posts: 650
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 3:20 am

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by RoneKiln » Tue Dec 25, 2012 3:01 am

The books I'd recomend in order,

More Straw Bale Building
http://www.amazon.com/More-Straw-Bale-B ... e+building
About as detailed as a novice can handle on building quality, permitted Straw Bale homes.

Serious Straw Bale
http://www.amazon.com/Serious-Straw-Bal ... e+building
Geared more towards contractors, and a good second book to read on the subject if you have some construction background.

Lastly, Design of Straw Bale Buildings, the State of the Art
http://www.amazon.com/Design-Straw-Bale ... e+building
Oriented to engineers and inspectors. Should be readable for you if you have construction experience.

I've worked on several Straw Bale homes. Feel free to PM me.

I also strongly agree with the advice on getting the legalities all straightened out first. Even before it gets to the next generation, honest misunderstandings or faulty memories could cause incredible harm to the social dynamic of the family. It's not an issue of distrusting family, but of wanting to protect them. I have some books on planned communities I could recomend also that might have some good info on setting up the legal structure. As everyone is family it may not be perfectly suited, but many of the general principles would be similar enough to be applicable and get you moving in the right direction to protect everyone and the close bonds you now enjoy.
"Seriously the most dangerous thing you are likely to do is to put salt on a Big Mac right before you eat it and to climb into your car."
--Raptor

User avatar
DarkAxel
* * * * *
Posts: 3809
Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:25 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: The Evil Dead Series, Dawn of the Dead, Shawn of the Dead, NOTLD, Resident Evil Series
Location: Jackson, KY
Contact:

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by DarkAxel » Tue Dec 25, 2012 4:49 am

I've been a General Contractor now for about 3 years. I don't have much experience with alternative building styles (like straw bale building and the like), but I've built homes from the ground up using traditional methods like stick framing. You are free to pick my brain any time.

It's been my experience that corrugated metal siding and roofing isn't as rust resistant as painted metal siding or aluminum siding, and paint doesn't stick to it very well on account of it being galvanized.

Yes, I'm up and posting on ZS this early on Christmas day. Don't judge me!
vyadmirer wrote:Call me the paranoid type, but remember I'm on a post apocalyptic website prepared for zombies.
Fleet #: ZS 0180

Browncoat

Imma Fudd, and proud of it.

ZS Wiki

User avatar
maldon007
* * * * *
Posts: 4097
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2009 10:49 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Most of the older stuff, newer stuff just doesnt cut it fsr...
Location: Pickle Bucket Brigade
Contact:

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by maldon007 » Tue Dec 25, 2012 7:38 am

I am sort of a do-it-all builder myself, so doing what you want to do, build most of a house yourself, is something I think I could do. BUT one issue is time, the guys that do it every day & generally stick to one (or two) expertice, get it done fast. When I do projects that take some learning & code following, combinned with being very carefull cause it's MY actual house... The time to completion starts to get looooong :lol:
Image

User avatar
roOism
* * * * *
Posts: 1154
Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:18 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later
Location: Somewhere cold.

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by roOism » Tue Dec 25, 2012 4:57 pm

Time is definitely going to be an issue. I'm thinking I might drag my little bro up with me to go to college nearby, and put him to work in exchange for free housing, plus all the friends would pitch in. I think I may have found a solution that would solve the ownership issue. I found a 25 acre parcel of land that is reasonably priced (about $4k an acre), that can be parceled off in 5 acre chunks. I could buy land myself, then a parcel to each of the brothers that wanted to buy in, which would give me some starting money for the house. I've discussed it with them briefly and they thought it was a fair deal. If I got two to buy in, that'd be $40k for me, plus I'd still have 15 acres to build the homestead on.

Thanks for the links and the tips.
"Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must." - Goethe

User avatar
colinz
* * * * *
Posts: 2602
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:23 am
Location: Brisbane

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by colinz » Wed Dec 26, 2012 10:45 pm

roOism wrote: Time is definitely going to be an issue. I'm thinking I might drag my little bro up with me to go to college nearby, and put him to work in exchange for free housing, plus all the friends would pitch in. I think I may have found a solution that would solve the ownership issue. I found a 25 acre parcel of land that is reasonably priced (about $4k an acre), that can be parceled off in 5 acre chunks. I could buy land myself, then a parcel to each of the brothers that wanted to buy in, which would give me some starting money for the house. I've discussed it with them briefly and they thought it was a fair deal. If I got two to buy in, that'd be $40k for me, plus I'd still have 15 acres to build the homestead on.

Thanks for the links and the tips.
That's not a silly way to do things.

I know that here in NZ there is a limit of one dwelling per parcel of land under XXX acres, so by buying a large plot of land cheaply, then legally subdividing it into smaller blocks and 'on-selling' them, you would get around this restriction quite nicely. If each block of land has it's own title, that would also help with the issues raised earlier with family 'problems'.

You may run into some hidden costs since doing this would effectively make you a 'developer' and you may be required to pay contributions towards the electricity/sewer/water network expansion to cover the 'new' properties that you will be on-selling.

With the building of the actual house, personally, I would be having a house built by professionals to the 'lock-up' stage (where the structure is up, exterior cladding is on, roof is on and windows n doors are installed), and sort the finishing out myself (plumbing/drainlaying/electrical/insulation/etc). To me this seems the best way of keeping the costs down, while still having the house built to the appropriate codes.

Plus I'm an electrician and also know a few guys in other building trades, so cash jobs/mates rates help a hell of a lot too. :)

User avatar
That German Guy
* * * * *
Posts: 1672
Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:59 pm
Location: Close to Germany's largest urban sprawl.

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by That German Guy » Thu Dec 27, 2012 4:43 pm

First of all, good idea, and good comments on this thread so far.

A few ideas from me:
Please build a solid house. What is being built today in the US seems to be made of drywall and sticks: Losta maintenance and limited inheritability. If financially and logistically possible, a brick house will outlast your grandchildren(and stop medium-caliber raider fire, and lose only the roof in a tornado, and and and).
Think about doing two electrical systems, one 110VAC, one 12(or 24)VDC if you plan to roll your own electricity. It saves you lots of conversion losses, since there are LVDC versions of most appliances, and others (halogen lights, LEDs, laptop computers) are inherently LVDC.
More rooms is better if heating is not an issue. If it is, divide the house in half with a well-insulated wall(with everything essential on one side of it), and heat only one side in a crisis.
On a related note: If the water table is low enough to not require extra drainage, a basement is always a good idea.

On roll your own housing: The work can be backbreaking, but most things except building structural elements can be done by any intelligent person, providing they read up on it and get a few hour's training. I redid the entire inside of my house over half a year, stripping down to bare brick and plastering, wallpapering, painting (plus installing the abovementioned two electrical systems) with a buddy and the wife. Saved about 20k if you factor in the *ahem* scrounged materials.
SMoAF wrote:We all ended up moving in together at one point, and I paid our rent in guns.
Vicarious_Lee wrote:No one on ZS worth their membership would be in a frozen forest, alone, without being loaded out like they've got Les Fucking Stroud himself in their enormous and ergonomic backpack.

User avatar
grennels
* * * *
Posts: 907
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: North Central Ohio

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by grennels » Thu Dec 27, 2012 7:08 pm

A good friend of mine who knew nothing about construction built his
own stick built home. Hired the foundation done. And he had the help
of many friends who were in various trades, framing, roofing, electrical,
etc. I doubt he could have done it without the help. But he wound up with
1200 sq feet at about half market cost. And no debt. Good luck.


I, personally, would go underground. Easy to heat, fireproof, tornado proof,
defensible.
Shot 'em, now I'm gonna hang 'em, then I'm gonna burn 'em!
Damn Zombies. Can't ever be too dead to suit me.

- with apologies to Larry McMurtry

User avatar
Halfapint
* * * * *
Posts: 3663
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: all?
Location: Central Cascadia

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by Halfapint » Thu Feb 14, 2013 4:52 pm

I know this thread is kind of dead... so sorry for the necro but........

I've been planning and looking at building a shipping container home for quite some time I even had some land but because of the city I bought it in now considers it a "wet land" I'm pretty much SOL.

But shipping container houses area cheap and honestly SOOOO easy to build. Get the foundation poured (have it done professionally) you can design one in your spare time using the standard for shipping containers, 20' 40' and 52'. after that its welding them together, insulation, and everything else. the glory is they are meant to be shipped across the ocean swaying an getting beat up so they are almost bomb proof. Plus you have steel protecting your stuff and not wood. Just a thought for ya, you can find lots of resources online.

I guess the biggest downside for this where you live is finding the shipping containers. I have 6 sitting on my parents property (because mine is a wetland) that i got for free. 4 40' containers an 2 20'..... FO FREE!

Best of luck!!
JeeperCreeper wrote:I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

RoneKiln
* * *
Posts: 650
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 3:20 am

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by RoneKiln » Thu Feb 14, 2013 8:37 pm

IceMyst: Some municipalities in Western Washington have allowed minor construction in wetlands with Pin Foundations. http://www.pinfoundations.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; There's generally some other requirements to protect the soil while hauling in materials as well. You also direct the roof rainwater to the uphill side of the dwelling, so it runs under the house and absorbs into the ground it would have naturally fallen on. Studies have shown that if you don't seal off the underside with skirting, the moisture under the house doesn't linger and cause any more rot/rust than it would on your walls.

Might be worth looking into if you can use this on your wetlands. If so, you may have an advantage in lower tax rates on an otherwise "undevelopable" site that still allows the home you want.

Curtis Hinman over at WSU's Puyallup research facility would be a good resource for finding similar construction projects to use as proof of concept to your local zoning board.
"Seriously the most dangerous thing you are likely to do is to put salt on a Big Mac right before you eat it and to climb into your car."
--Raptor

User avatar
Halfapint
* * * * *
Posts: 3663
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: all?
Location: Central Cascadia

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by Halfapint » Fri Feb 15, 2013 1:40 am

RoneKiln wrote:IceMyst: Some municipalities in Western Washington have allowed minor construction in wetlands with Pin Foundations. http://www.pinfoundations.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; There's generally some other requirements to protect the soil while hauling in materials as well. You also direct the roof rainwater to the uphill side of the dwelling, so it runs under the house and absorbs into the ground it would have naturally fallen on. Studies have shown that if you don't seal off the underside with skirting, the moisture under the house doesn't linger and cause any more rot/rust than it would on your walls.

Might be worth looking into if you can use this on your wetlands. If so, you may have an advantage in lower tax rates on an otherwise "undevelopable" site that still allows the home you want.

Curtis Hinman over at WSU's Puyallup research facility would be a good resource for finding similar construction projects to use as proof of concept to your local zoning board.
yea I've looked into that but the problem comes with the terrain because I'm pretty much in a flat land there is now "uphill" also my plan was to dig down to build a basement. The problem is that the land I own is actually not a wetland it is merely not taken care of. It has a stream and trees. Well the trees over the years have dumped all their vegetation in the stream and filled it in so the water has over flowed onto the land and saturated it to the point it looks like a wetland....... but anyways yea I dunno i really don't like the land at this point because its small and I want something bigger.
JeeperCreeper wrote:I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

User avatar
zombieguide
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:08 am
Contact:

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by zombieguide » Thu Feb 28, 2013 7:24 am

Anyway, sounds like a great idea. In the spirit of protection, build a big wall and maybe some water around the property :)

User avatar
spanningtree
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 320
Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2012 12:57 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Resident Evil
Location: LV,NV

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by spanningtree » Thu Feb 28, 2013 11:31 am

Yeah, sounds like a great idea. Iv'e been catching a program called "Building Alaska" on the DIY channel. The program shows folks building from the ground up with various skills, typically out in the boonies with limited resources. Interesting stuff, you may want to catch an episode or two.

User avatar
charadeur
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 214
Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2012 9:32 pm

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by charadeur » Thu Feb 28, 2013 1:25 pm

I got picked for a jury once on one of those grandchildren battles over a piece of property. It was 5 against 2. No one really won.

Only you can say how much of the work you can do. For example I am confident I can build a small cabin but not so confident I could do an acceptable job on a 5000 sq foot palace with all the bells and whistles. I figure even with a small cabin there are a lot of things I would have to learn along the way like I have done a lot of wiring on existing installations but never a new installation. I'm sure I would have questions but I do have the resources with friends who could answer those questions.
I may be the one walking away, but you're the one that's leaving.

travelkirk
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2018 10:42 am

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by travelkirk » Thu Jul 19, 2018 10:46 am

Did you end up building the house using corrugated metal?

I've been given a whole bunch of sheet metal, and I own 7 acres in the Texas Hill Country.

I love the look of the cabin in the photo!

I would love to learn from your experience!

:awesome:

User avatar
NT2C
ZS Global Moderator
ZS Global Moderator
Posts: 6359
Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 2:37 pm
Location: Outside of your jurisdiction officer

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by NT2C » Thu Jul 19, 2018 1:21 pm

travelkirk wrote:
Thu Jul 19, 2018 10:46 am
Did you end up building the house using corrugated metal?

I've been given a whole bunch of sheet metal, and I own 7 acres in the Texas Hill Country.

I love the look of the cabin in the photo!

I would love to learn from your experience!

:awesome:
I approved your post but I would like to point out to you that the last time anyone commented in this thread was more than 5 years ago and the members may no longer be active on our system.
Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto
Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Except sailors. They will kill you and sing songs about it.

Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles

User avatar
roOism
* * * * *
Posts: 1154
Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:18 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later
Location: Somewhere cold.

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by roOism » Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:28 pm

Holy thread necro batman!

Plans changed, met a girl, got married, spawned, etc... I did end up moving to Idaho but just recently and we're living in an apartment. Still looking at buying some land and building some sort of cool house, but the local real estate market isn't great right now, so for now we wait.
"Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must." - Goethe

User avatar
NT2C
ZS Global Moderator
ZS Global Moderator
Posts: 6359
Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 2:37 pm
Location: Outside of your jurisdiction officer

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by NT2C » Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:42 pm

roOism wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:28 pm
I did end up moving to Idaho
Where at? The wife is from Lewiston and we'll be moving up there within the next year.
Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto
Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Except sailors. They will kill you and sing songs about it.

Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles

User avatar
Halfapint
* * * * *
Posts: 3663
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: all?
Location: Central Cascadia

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by Halfapint » Fri Jul 20, 2018 2:31 pm

roOism wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:28 pm
Holy thread necro batman!

Plans changed, met a girl, got married, spawned, etc... I did end up moving to Idaho but just recently and we're living in an apartment. Still looking at buying some land and building some sort of cool house, but the local real estate market isn't great right now, so for now we wait.
Thank WA for that, lots of retirees are moving out of Seattle and Tacoma because the housing market is so expensive. They are selling their houses and buying land in ID. Boise has really blown up recently because of it.
JeeperCreeper wrote:I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

User avatar
roOism
* * * * *
Posts: 1154
Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:18 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later
Location: Somewhere cold.

Re: DIY Homebuilding.

Post by roOism » Sat Jul 21, 2018 12:13 pm

KJ4VOV wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:42 pm
roOism wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:28 pm
I did end up moving to Idaho
Where at? The wife is from Lewiston and we'll be moving up there within the next year.
Idaho Falls area, SE Idaho. I have a brother that works up in Lewiston, live outside of Moscow, I like it up there. Haven't been up in a few years but I've been thinking of perhaps moving up to northern Idaho closer to my brother in a couple years.
Halfapint wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 2:31 pm

Thank WA for that, lots of retirees are moving out of Seattle and Tacoma because the housing market is so expensive. They are selling their houses and buying land in ID. Boise has really blown up recently because of it.
Yeah my parents bought a place outside of Boise to retire a couple years ago, and theyr'e seeing a huge influx of people from WA and CA moving into the area. East Idaho hasn't been hit as hard, but lots of locals are building new houses and trying to sell their old house for top dollar to pay for it. I imagine within the next 3-5 years that's going to implode on itself. There are tiny little 2 bed 1 bath 800sq/f homes built in the 30's-50's that are listed for close to $100K. That's probably cheap compared to coastal places, but not long ago that house would have sold for $60K.
"Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must." - Goethe

Post Reply

Return to “Self-Sufficient Living”