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PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2011 12:17 pm 
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Garyedge wrote:
When i say i running check points i meant like setting them, manning them and protecting a neighborhood.
And when i said fortifying i meant anything for the loot/shoot signs to running patrols and that sort of thing.


Despite what was said the vast majority of the people in the GNO area left; there was little manpower for checkpoints or patrols even if anyone was a desired to do so.

This guy was recently indicted for his activity during such activity.

http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/201 ... trial.html

This is an article describing his activity.
http://www.propublica.org/article/shoot ... shed-light


I did not have any altercations with the people I met. I treated everyone I met with respect and had few problems during such meetings. As for the authorities they were spread thin and reacted in widely different ways. See the earlier thread I referenced for more details.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2011 12:39 pm 
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raptor wrote:

Despite what was said the vast majority of the people in the GNO area left; there was little manpower for checkpoints or patrols even if anyone was a desired to do so.

This guy was recently indicted for his activity during such activity.

http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/201 ... trial.html

This is an article describing his activity.
http://www.propublica.org/article/shoot ... shed-light


I did not have any altercations with the people I met. I treated everyone I met with respect and had few problems during such meetings. As for the authorities they were spread thin and reacted in widely different ways. See the earlier thread I referenced for more details.


thanks for all the excellent info
basically 3 things from your experience I learned
High speed low drag = dead
Low profile = staying alive
Treat others with respect and you wont have a bad day

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2013 2:22 pm 
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As we're a couple months from hurricane season, and it hasn't been dug up in a while, I thought I'd bump this thread. :)

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2013 3:39 pm 
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The only thing I have to compair to Katrina was Sandy in NJ. Thankfully it didn't affect me directly, but I have some friends and co-workers that had homes (Mostly vacation/rental properties) along the NJ shore that got hit bad.

Going back on the suggestions the original poster Raptor threw out there, the same held true with Sandy.

1) In most cases the Shore towns were sealed off by LE, because they had checkpoints at bridges into the barrier island towns and wanted to check for proof of residency, however a few of my friends who were driving work trucks, were waived thru without too much fuss, while others driving cars had to wait in line for hours.

2) 4x4 were very useful, especially heavy duty pickups with winches or tow hitches and straps.

3) I'm not sure if it was mentioned in this thread, but cleaning products, especially power washers and bleach was very handy. Flood waters usually contain sewage. Throw out what you can, but if you can't clean it well.

4) Gas and Fuel seems to be an issues, however I never understood why people in NJ & NY waited for hours at their local gas station for gas, when they could have drove a hour west and bought all the gas they wanted with no wait. Have extra fuel containers/cans, and don't expect to buy them after the event happens. I live in PA, over 65 miles away from the closest Sandy affected town in NJ, and every Home Depot,Gas Station, and Department store in MY AREA was sold out of Gas Cans for weeks.

5) Same goes true with other supplies. I was talking to a Sales Clerk at REI, and they had people from NYC driving over 100 miles to their store looking for lanterns, sleeping bags, propane stoves, etc. Prep now, don't wait until the last minute.


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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 5:54 am 
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Hey Everyone:

Thank you everyone for posting your experiences. I found them all to be very, very helpful.

Odinsown

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PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 6:06 pm 
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It took several days starting and stopping as time allowed, but I finally finished this thread.

This was a very good read and contains some extremely useful information for anyone looking to prepare for any likely natural disaster.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 23, 2013 9:54 pm 
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I just finished this one, again. One of the best threads I have seen about how things really are, anywhere. And, to echo so many others this thread helped get my wife to take things a little more seriously when I first showed it to her.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2015 12:04 pm 
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Just re read this thread. This is still probably the best ,instructional and closest scenario write up to a PAW type of event. And one of the best threads on this entire site. Thank you again Raptor ( and everyone else who contributed ) for your time and effort in typing this all up. Absolutely riveting.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2015 1:03 am 
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Hehe, you made me log in for the first time in a while. There's another site....and in no way do I want to diminish Raptor's experience...or his original post...BUT...I'm going to put this out there in the interest of helping others be more prepared. There's a site, at http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs ... index.html where a gentleman describes his Hurricane Katrina experience, the general milieu of the event, what he did wrong, AND what he did to tighten up.

It took me a couple days to get through his site, but I was distracted with a job, a wife, several small children, and some adult beverages...so you may get thru it faster than I did. Regardless of the time it took, I ended up printing his entire website in order to review it wherever I went ( I do not have a portable internet thingy) along with all the worksheets he made available.

Just wanted to throw it out there. -Juney-

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2015 10:39 am 
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Yes that is a great site you referenced and the blogger has some very good advice.

There are a couple of other sites that I will try to reference and link. One thing to bear in mind is that this post was written about events 10 years ago. Technology has changed a lot since then. For example a lot of adults in NOLA used text messages for the first time in the wake of the storm. Emergency lighting capability is now much easier and less costly due to advances in LED lighting which brought the cost down.

Facebook would have been a wonderful tool to have to help connect the missing people.

I am not saying this type of regional event will be less traumatic only that we now have different ways to address the issues.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2015 4:39 pm 
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If I may offer something to the discussion:
http://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com/2008/08/lessons-learned-from-hurricanes-katrina.html

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2015 5:34 pm 
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aikorob wrote:


The ones posted previously are the two I generally suggest.

Juney wrote:
There's a site, at http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs ... index.html where a gentleman describes his Hurricane Katrina experience, the general milieu of the event, what he did wrong, AND what he did to tighten up.


Here are others.
http://www.thekatrinaexperience.net

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... Id=5704652

This is very long and is really just the local newspaper's log of the news stories it published by day.
http://www.nola.com/katrina/archive.html#incart_2box

A blog site
http://www.herrickhomepage.com/katrina.htm

A facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/mykatrinastory

A non facebook link to the stories:
http://topics.nola.com/tag/my-katrina-story/posts.html

BTW this is a great story in the archive and the quote illustrates the old sage advice of " it is not what you know but who you know".

Quote:
"Guests did start leaving, finding ways to leave and as rooms became available, Entergy asked us if they could check in. So then, we became one of the first businesses in the city to get power again. They took up about 50 of our rooms," he said.


http://blog.nola.com/new_orleans/2015/0 ... nager.html



These are some good books on the subject:

A great book for medical professionals discusses the things many NOLA hospital staff learned from the storm.
http://www.pelicanpub.com/proddetail.ph ... cfNBvlViko

This book details the aftermath of the storm in St Bernard Parish. This area was hit much harder than often described 9th ward of NOLA.
http://www.pelicanpub.com/proddetail.ph ... cfOKflViko

Finally IMO this book is the best and by far most factual written description of the disaster.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/great-d ... 0061148491


BTW looking back at Katrina +10, the best advice I can give you can be summed up in this advice.

1) Make sure your property is adequate insured against the relevant risks.
2) Prepare ahead of time and do not rely on any preparations that you do not control.
3) Avoidance of risks is a very smart strategy.
4) Take responsibility for the safety of you and your loved ones.
5) Make your own decisions and take appropriate lawful action based upon your needs and risks.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 4:06 pm 
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Here are a series of articles around the ten year mark.

http://www.cnn.com/specials/us/hurricane-katrina

When I was last in NOLA I was struck by the number of hospitals that still stood abandoned and vacant ten years later. Something to keep in mind about quality of life after major events.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:48 pm 
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Stercutus wrote:
When I was last in NOLA I was struck by the number of hospitals that still stood abandoned and vacant ten years later. Something to keep in mind about quality of life after major events.


I will give you a bit of context for the closed hospitals.

Charity Hospital remains closed and is likely never to re-open. It was built and opened in the 1930. It was functionally obsolete as a hospital decades ago.

The N.O. East medical complex was never rebuilt although a smaller hospital was recently opened there for the simple reason no hospital operator wanted the place.


Then there is the huge medical complex being built on Tulane Ave includes a brand new 1.6 million sq ft VA hospital (which makes the existing VA hospital obsolete) and the University medical center which has 450 beds well as a medical, pharmacy and nursing school.

http://www.nola.com/health/index.ssf/20 ... going.html

http://www.wdsu.com/news/local-news/new ... t/34487596

With rare logic, a first for NOLA (in my lifetime anyway), instead of rebuilding damaged obsolete properties, new structures were built. Shocking I know but Katrina produced many new firsts.

However yes the old structures remain standing.

As for quality of life issues I can assure you NOLA is back.

It is not the same old NOLA. It is less happy and seemingly more violent in the less civilized areas. It is still run by a dysfunctional group of "food trough wipers who smell of elderberries" with an agenda but NOLA being NOLA will survive despite them. :D

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 3:50 pm 
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I heard about the new hospital (it opened after my last visit). Ten years is a long time to go without a major medical center in a city the size of NOLA.

I see they are planning on opening a replacement VA hospital next year. What about Lindsay Boggs?

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 6:00 pm 
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The hospitals in Jefferson Parish never shut down. They set up an emergency trauma center in the CBD of all places and took over an idled private hospital also in Jefferson Parish. This of course took a while so other than the Jefferson Parish hospitals and the trauma center the hospital ship Hope was moored in the river for several months in 2006.

The real issue was the dearth of medical professionals not so much the lack of facilities. Especially missed were mental health professionals to deal with the mental trauma. The suicide rate, divorce, domestic violence and other similar mental issues were rampant for a while.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 6:13 pm 
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I heard about the mental professionals leaving and not returning. Makes one wonder what they figured out.

Even with the hospitals open in the parish the response times and transport times would be increased a bit due to distance. The lower number of beds would be offset due to the lower population from many people not returning.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 9:07 pm 
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Stercutus wrote:
Even with the hospitals open in the parish the response times and transport times would be increased a bit due to distance.


That was absolutely the case in parts of the city. In fact during the initial months one of my biggest concerns for my workers was the lack of anything more than rudimentary first aid on the scene and either a long drive to the ER or a very long wait for an EMT unit.

In a disaster zone the lack of medical care should be paramount in the mind of anyone trying to get something done.

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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2016 6:55 am 
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Hurricane season is looming; time to bump this thread again.

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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 12:42 am 
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Just finished reading this thread. Not sure how I missed it before. God, what a nightmare. My husband and I were living in Ruston at the time, and I was very pregnant with my first. I taught 5th grade at public school. I'm from Franklinton, all my family was still there or in more rural parts of the parish. Talked to my mom the day before it hit, she said they were "fine" but it was so suddenly a threat to Louisiana (most people thought it had died in the Gulf) so quickly that the stores were wiped out already, and they didn't have many supplies. Despite living there for decades through many storms, I think they had gotten a little complacent. I begged them to come up before the evacuations got terrible, but they weren't expecting the conditions to be very bad beyond a few days at the most. I remember on Monday sitting in my classroom refreshing cnn on my computer over and over, and my heart sinking more each time. The land lines and cell phones had been dead since that morning. There was no facebook, and very few message boards. I knew my family hadn't been prepared, and I knew there wasn't a damn thing I could do about it. My husband would have never consented for us to go down and try to help with me being 7 months pregnant.

The next few days were some of the worst of my life up to that point. We had evacuee children pouring into our school system. To say they were traumatized would be a major understatement. We all did our best to make things feel as normal as possible for them, but we all felt very inadequate. I had no idea how my family had fared, but I knew without a doubt that it was much, much worse than they had expected. It was terrifying, to say the least.

Friday my husband called me and said my mom had managed to get through to his phone for a couple of minutes. They were about 30 minutes away and it was the first time their phones had worked. They barely made it to Ruston because Monroe was the first place they found gas (about 250 miles from Franklinton). We found out later the Washington Parish "officials" had shut down all the gas stations 2 days before it hit because they "needed" all the gas to "help" the citizens. They only had what was in their vehicles. I've never let our vehicles get below 3/4 since then.

They things they told us - I still almost can't believe some of it. It was truly a PAW situation in the rural areas and small towns. My dad stayed to watch the house and property and sent mom and sis up to us. They were in shock watching the news. They hadn't realized how widespread the destruction was until they got away from it. They planned to stay with us for as long as they needed to. Unfortunately they were only able to stay a week. My dad got through on the phone long enough to tell us that my uncle had a heart attack and had died because there was no way to get to a hospital. We tried to talk them into staying, but my mom needed to go back to be with her siblings, which I understood, as hard as it was to let them go. We loaded their vehicle with supplies.

Thank God, they got home safely, although conditions were pretty much the same, and didn't really start to get better for a couple of months. They still don't like to talk about it, understandably. I hope to God that nobody I love ever has to go through anything like that again, but it was definitely the wake-up call I needed. Living in the city, I had forgotten some of the prepping lessons I had learned growing up down there. Anytime I hear someone say the "government" will take care of them in a disaster, I give them a wake-up call of my own and tell them some of the more horrifying stories from Katrina.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2016 4:19 pm 
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As an interesting comparison to the after action type reports, trying to see what really happened and how it could been handled better, This Thread on ZS viewtopic.php?f=22&t=6210 started by Joe Ghoul was more or less live blogging people's bug outs and news reports. What's most interesting about it to me is how much incorrect information was widely believed at the time to be true. I'm not talking about casual rumors - I'm talking official statements by the chief of police, mayor, governor, etc that turned out to be wildly inaccurate hysteria (the bodies stacked like cordwood in the superdome, people raping babies, etc)

Getting quality intelligence while a major event is happening is very difficult.

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ZombieKraft wrote:
Excellent trick with parking across the street. You are certainly one wily cat!

I've never bribed anyone with actual money. Cokes.. Beer... sure. But the napkins to an actual public official is something that I'm accustomed to. From your talk about "life treating you well" and your employees it's obvious you had the need to check up on property. In your situation you were taking relatively safe risks as you had to check on your property. A perfectly legal and reasonable request in times of crisis. I'm curious as to how you decided when you needed to give someone a 5, 10, 20 or 100.

Thanks for your response. This has been most informative.


Unfortunately, I have had to bribe a lot of people, usually in the Philippines and a few times south of the border. But since I stopped going south of the border, it is almost exclusively in the Philippines.

I hate generalizations, but I would guess that absolutely no one in the Philippines takes a government job (Political or Civil Service) for the standard pay. Sometimes any job. They take it for the bribes.

Raptor has it correct, never take out your wallet, or make it obvious that you are forking over some cash. Slip it to them as a napkin or some other way. Shake their hands and look them in the eye when you do.

I've had to bribe cops, firemen, DMV officials, IRS (Filipino, not U.S.), even water, sewer and electric company employees, postal. Once a Doctor and a couple of Nurses and orderlies.

It is an unfortunate cost of living and doing business in the PI. Otherwise good luck on getting anything done in a timely manner.

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bgnad wrote:
To Quote Robert A. Hienlein,

"A bribe must be offered with the same amount of discretion used to make a gallant proposal to a noble lady." if I am remembering correctly from the notebooks of Lazarus Long.
I'll have to dig up my copy.

Hope that helps give you the idea.

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ZombieKraft wrote:
I was hoping for some pointers but I guess I'm not going to get any. :(


That is becuase half of what you are looking for can't be put into words, only experinced. There isn't a checklist or three easy steps that always works, just actual observation.


QFT. Well put ironraven.
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Well said, treat them with respect. After all they are usually someone you are trying to get to do something for you, or in some cases are in a position of power.

Some years back while I was on leave in the PI, I was in Olongapo City visiting with my future wife, back then Filipina women who walked around with Americans or other Foreigners were almost always go-go girls......hookers. So all of them carried some type of card. Not sure what it was called, I never got my hands on one. But I saw them in use more than a dozen times over the years.

Anyway the local Pulis or PNP (Philippines National Police) would often stop (usually around Military Payday which was the 1st and the 15th) mixed race couples and ask the female for her card.

Of course this would lead to some type of questioning of both the male and female. At this point the bribe would come out and the Pulis would go away.

Lil and I were standing in front of Max's Restaurant on Magsaysay drive when a mixed race couple was stopped. The female handed the Pulis her card, and then the questioning started at which point the male slipped some cash out of his pocket and the ordeal was over.

However the dipstick male made a snide comment out loud just as the Pulis were turning away to leave. They stopped and started in on the male. He ended up loosing his watch, wallet and had to empty his pockets as well. They even took his dog tags.

All I remember was him saying something about worthless corrupt cops.......imho he was extremely lucky to just loose all of his valuables, usually they end up beating you half to death, then taking you to Jail where the inmates work you over....until the SPs show up to take charge of you.

Then of course there are the "charges" filed against you by the Pulis which have to be dealt with.

Heck sometimes you even had to "bribe" the go-go girls......otherwise they would (I can't remember the what it was called) file some charges against you, like you promised to marry them....which....go it Legal Hold. Basically you were not leaving the PI until the Legal Hold was lifted.

Usually that meant paying a bribe to the girl or whomever filed the Legal Hold.

One of the reasons a lot of Military there never gave them their real names or what unit they were in......we were told never to tell them our real names, what unit we were in, how long we would be there.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2016 10:54 pm 
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I've read this thread a few times and I always pick up something different. While my position on the social ladder is different than Raptors my plan would basically hinge on the same thing. Get family out of town as early as possible to someplace preferably with family out of any major storms path. Best case they get to visit family for a bit. Worst case they get to visit family for an extended period. However I get to stay in town due to my position as a Firefighter/EMT in southern east coast city.

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