Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Share a personal survival experience with us and explain what you learned from it. You might help someone.

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by raptor » Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:04 pm

Great post. Thank you for sharing your experiences. Sorry you had to leave the city. I am glad that you were able to deal with the disaster and get out safely.

The stress that your girlfriend experienced was exactly what I have mentioned several times. It is a very unnerving experience to go from a functioning city to a disaster zone.

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Re: Katrina Experiances Note this is very long

Post by bgnad » Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:31 pm

Hex7f7f7f wrote: I had written up a large post about my experience living in New Orleans during Katrina, but realized that the best advice I could think of had already been given.
Hex, I have to agree with Raptor here, tell us what you came up with, it might be something we have not thought of.
Like;
Hex7f7f7f wrote: One thing I can't recommend enough is to get a hat. My head was so sunburned from sitting outside that it blistered and scabbed over my hair. I ended up shaving it bald, but was so covered in sores and raw skin it looked like I had mange.
This is an excellent piece of advice! And one that is very often overlooked today.
I usually wear a wide brimmed hat to defend myself from the sun (my hair is getting thinner :) )
But I cannot recall mentioning it as gear advice.

Thanks for Bringing it up.
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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Laconic 24 » Sat Oct 23, 2010 1:51 am

Great post, thanks for sharing your experiences. Reading this thread is making me re-examine my preparations.

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by ........ » Sat Oct 23, 2010 5:20 pm

Hex7f7f7f wrote:At the same time, there was an increased population of quasi-homeless. People who weren't the typical homeless of New Orleans (yes New Orleans had a lot)... they were Hippie-esque types who came from all over the country to "help", but were living off food and medical support from the Red Cross, sleeping in parks, and not really doing anything of substance to aid in restoring the city. No volunteer work. Nothing really. I met a number of young kids (under 14) whose parents were part of this group of people. They spent their days wandering the Quarter begging for money or anything else they could get their hands on. I know, eventually, the group in the park near me was kicked out, but they were there for months.
I tried to sig this but its too big. At least I got some of it. :P

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Hex7f7f7f » Mon Oct 25, 2010 2:05 pm

Lord Bane wrote:I tried to sig this but its too big. At least I got some of it. :P
I had to re-write that part a few times. The first tries were rather unfriendly...

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by akraven » Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:53 pm

Thank you to Raptor and the other folks for taking the time to share all of the info with us. Definitely some things I had never heard of or thought of. Excellent!!

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Redemption » Fri Jan 07, 2011 12:36 am

Wow, I have been in several hurricanes in SW Florida (Native) and I have been in situations with no (grid) power/water for weeks. I have been in big snow up to my waist with hypothermia after 24 hours of exposure. I have served as the sole LEO on a large train derailment (until fed and rail police showed up). I have dealt with a ton of irate people in different mass casualty/first responder incidents(I have been a LEO in past and am currently a Firefighter/EMT).
Amazing all the experience gained in this one thread. Thanks to everyone who posted.

One more thing. Does anyone feel they have some form of PTSD from all of this.
I'm interested to hear from anyone in a disaster with lasting traumatic effects.
As I personally have experienced this on some level.

(oh yeah) bump!
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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by badevilcow » Mon Jan 10, 2011 1:42 pm

This is one of the most eye opening, information rich, and fairly scary things I have ever read. One of the greatest threads on any forum that I have had the pleasure (and displeasure) of reading.

Thank you everyone for sharing,

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by raptor » Fri Feb 04, 2011 12:13 pm

This is an interesting NY times article that discusses the results of the 2010 census which shows the population of the city of New Orleans (Orleans Parish/County) declined by 29% and the city has dropped off the list of the top 50 cities (in terms of population). The Greater New Orleans area population did decline but only by approximately 10%. The population that predominantly returned but to other parishes in the surrounding area. The population also tended to shift northward away from the coastline and more inland (imagine that :wink: ).

This article focuses on the 9th Ward but clearly this is simply a small portion of the city that was popularized by the press. This area was not the hardest hit or the poorest, but it is certainly the slowest to return to normal.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/04/us/04 ... ELB/BEQX6g" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

An article in the local paper which shows the population movement.
http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/ ... his_w.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by neilbilly » Wed Feb 09, 2011 2:14 pm

Raptor

Thanks for the original post and for all of the follow up. Lots of good food for thought there from you and many others. It's been out there a while and I'm a bit surprised that nobody has recognized just how cool it was of you to spot your employees a couple of weeks pay so that you knew they could bug out with one less worry. A lot of people really do live paycheck to paycheck with no emergency funds put back. Good on ya man.

I too live in Hurricane country. Small town in Texas about 25 miles inland from the gulf west of Galveston. I have a lot of friends up and down the coast and really feel the need to point out a couple of personal observations.

1. Katrina was BAD, but was handled as poorly as anything I have ever seen. They had several days warning, thousands of School busses, A MANDATORY evacuation order, and still all of the chaos and crap. Blanco was late declaring a state of emergency, so no national guard troops could roll in without it being considered an invasion of the soverign state of Lousianna. Nagin didn't send out crews catalogging who was staying with addresses which could have saved a lot of trouble in the aftermath, but did find time to bash Bush. In 50 years it's still going to look like a flooded ghetto. I have been to Hiroshima, Japan. I was there in 2007 and can tell you honestly that you would never have known anyone popped as much as a firecracker there if you slept through History class. There are some mighty fine folks to be found anywhere you look, but some places you have to look harder than others. I hope for the sake of folks like you and the rest of the decent people that what moves back, is better than what left.


2. Rita was a more powerful storm, hit a less populated area with a much higher per capita income. People in Winnie had 3 foot of storm surge in their homes. My friend in Bridge City found juvenile flounder in his living room. They weren't on the news asking about when the gubbermint was going to build them a new house. They weren't blaming anyone. Communities got together and with a lot of help from power company crews from different places, and volunteer groups from The Southern Baptist Men's group and many other fine folks they cleaned up and rebuilt. In any disaster it's a good idea to be in a place with decent people. If it's a rough place with all of the comforts of modern life, it's way worse with no power, utilities or meaningful law enforcement.

3. Ike was a nasty little guy. I own 2 1/2 lots and have my house on one lot and my shop on another. My shop is on the same part of the grid as the police station. It sits 47 feet from my home which is powered by a different part of the grid. My shop had power 9 hours after Ike rolled through. My home had power 8 days after that. I have 200 amp service for my shop and simply shut off the main to my house, wired heavy cables with male ends on each, and used 4 20 amp breakers wired into regular plugs to run 4 20 amp services back flowed into my house plugs on different circuits. I was able to run everything in the house other than my central a/c but have a couple of window units and a single room a/c that all were able to operate. It works really well and energizes all the plugs and switches in the series so whatever is plugged in simply works. I did run one of my generators to keep the fridge and freezer in the house energized before the power was restored to my shop. Really fortunate there, as I didn't have enough fuel for the generators on hand to run them for 8 days.

A couple of things that also were nice is that I was able to cook outside a lot as I had about 100 pounds of charcoal. I'm fortunate that I live in a decent neighborhood and we all helped eachother as much as we could. I loaned out both my chainsaws, had people's medicine in my fridge, and was able to offer crews from the power companies a cold drink and a grilled burger or hotdog. Some people showed up with food to grill, some showed up looking desperate, we all shared what we had and helped those in need. There was no looting in my town. Again, if it's a rough place when everything is normal, it's not a place you want to be when the wheels come off the cart.

A few things that can help if you have some warning.

If you have the freezer space, freeze bottled water rather than screwing around with bagged ice.
Having a couple of 120 quart coolers is great, 4 or 5 is REALLY great.
Charcoal keeps a long time, when it's on sale buy it and store it away. Charcoal grills are cheap, buy one.
Stabil is a good product. Todays ethanol dilluted gasoline will gum up carbs on generators and chainsaws if it's not treated or FRESH.
If you plan to shelter in place for a storm, it's a good idea to let law enforcement know where you live and how many of you are staying.
Know and have a decent relationship with your local police, and your neighbors.
Mobile radios and CB's are pretty handy when all lines are busy. NOA weather radios are good as well.
You can pack a lot of hotdogs into a 120 quart cooler and still have room to cover them with frozen water bottles. Same with Hamburger.
If you have pets or neighbors with pets, it's really nice if you can have some extra pet food on hand.

Raptor covered Tarps, trash bags, insect spray, sunscreen, paper plates and about never having too many cokes. "again, well done Raptor, thanks for sharing"

I'll start a thread later with some items I consider good gear to have for about any situation a little later.

Thanks for reading,

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by nerys » Mon Apr 25, 2011 2:19 pm

What an amazingly detailed story. thanks for posting it (all of you)

"A couple of things that also were nice is that I was able to cook outside a lot as I had about 100 pounds of charcoal. I'm fortunate that I live in a decent neighborhood and we all helped eachother as much as we could. I loaned out both my chainsaws, had people's medicine in my fridge, and was able to offer crews from the power companies a cold drink and a grilled burger or hotdog. Some people showed up with food to grill, some showed up looking desperate, we all shared what we had and helped those in need. There was no looting in my town. Again, if it's a rough place when everything is normal, it's not a place you want to be when the wheels come off the cart."

THIS part gives me hope for our species.

if more disasters were handled like this we would live in a much much better world.

we need to make our neighborhoods as much like this as we can. if enough of us do it the "lower life forms" will have a choice. live alone out in the middle or nowhere or JOIN the human race and work together.

I hope this kind of thing spreads.

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by airballrad » Tue Jul 19, 2011 8:11 am

BTT for newer users. :wink:

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Caffiend » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:02 am

I just re-read this entire post for the third time, and every time I'm so impressed with it. To me, this kind of post is what this forum is all about; real, practical first hand accounts of a truly SHTF situation, and how folks got through it.

I was wondering if those ZS'ers who are still in the NOLA area might want to chime in and let us all know how things are now in 2011; how recovery has been going, what has changed, what has not. I'm curious to see what has bounced back and what hasn't.

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by ei8htx » Mon Jul 25, 2011 1:25 am

I can't believe I've never seen this thread. Free bump.

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by CajunHam » Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:59 pm

The Danzinger five were convicted this afternoon August 15, 2011 of the shooting at the Danziger Bridge in New Orleans, Louisiana. This closes out a chapter in Katrina history that is part of this thread. More details will follow as we know what happened and as things are released by the court, we hope that this will close the chapter but it seems that other investigations will be opened to incidents which happened during Katrina.
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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Catshooter » Thu Aug 18, 2011 11:27 am

Raptor,

Thanks for your informative postings. One thing I take away is that having all of your defensive weapons out where they can be confiscated is probably poor tactics. I would really rather not get into a gunfight with LEO, regardless of how 'wrong' they may be.


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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Braums » Wed Aug 24, 2011 12:33 am

First, let me add my thanks to Raptor and everyone else who told their stories here. I know what my own family went through in E NC after Floyd hit and what we experienced in the RDU area when Fran and Bertha came through. At that time, prepping wasn't even part of my mindset.

One addition I will relay 2nd-hand from a good friend in the Hammond area is to also be careful of friends and family's emotional states. After her family finally made the decision to try and evac again (traffic was crawling and they had turned around), everyone was stressed, anxious and irritable. The whole family lives in close proximity. She and her husband had a newborn, her brother's family also had little ones. During the repacking, tempers flared and words were taken the wrong way, and her brother(who has some issues) took a swing at her.

You never know how someone's going to react to stress and what they will do.

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Anubis Zombie » Sat Aug 27, 2011 5:45 am

rotten shittin mumblin amateurs........ punk amateurs.......

"this reply has been redacted"
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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by SurfnBob » Sat Sep 17, 2011 4:02 pm

This is an excellent thread that is really chock full of info and details that those living away from coast might never experience. Having lived on a little barrier island off the coast of Texas for 25 odd years, hurricane prep becomes a part of life 9 months out of the year, with three months of planning on how to do stuff better next year. If this was mentioned previously and I missed it I apologize, but, if you plan on riding out a storm, and live in a place that MIGHT flood, immediately take an old hatchet or chisel and hammer or something that would enable you to break throught the roof if you needed to. I was going to stay for Ike but a frantic call at 3:00 am Friday from my pregnant wife and 5 year old(already evacuated to San Antonio) changed my mind. My brother stayed at my Grandma's house a block over and spent the night in the her attic. I would have been in the my attic as well, with 4 dogs, a cat,turle, and parrot. 4 feet of seawater in both houses. After getting back, 12 days later, I talked to many in the neighborhood who stayed, and ended up in the attic with nothing but a flashlight. One neighbor's car floated up and shifted in his garage, blocking his attic entrance, so him and his elderly parents spent the night on some tables. Had it been a just a windstorm and not such a devasting storm surge, I would have been living like a king. House really sustained no damage, windows were boarded and all still intact, trees luckily came down not on the house, salt water killed the rest(no more prestorm tree trimming!), generator full, propane grill full, water and supplies, etc.. long story short , here's a few things picked up after this f*#%king storm.
*Have a plan if you need to get in the attic, so many didn't and would have died around here if the water kept rising.
*Rubber maid or the like rubber tubs work great for storing things in you don't want to get wet or dirty, and they'll float as long as they can float up unobstructed, so don't stack em, or as my other neighbor did, take them out of the attic and stack them. Tables floated too, saving the stuff on top of them.
*A bicycle with one of those baby wagons on the back, is worth its weight in water,MREs,ice and other supplies. My brother was able to stock up himself and his neighbors who didn't have transportation. Not the best in a warzone, but around here nobody was messing with a big guy, tattooed up, riding a beach cruiser and wagon, with a machete(for snakes) strapped to his backpack.
*If someone cuts you in the ice, water, and MRE supply line,if you're lucky enought to have one in your area, don't become irate, especially if you have a big ass bayonet under the front seat(this was me, thought I was going to be arrested, they were cool just didn't want me following the folks to exact revenge or anything)
*This was mentioned before but a cold drink, or just asking how someone is doing, goes a long way.
*Realize that everyone is stressed out, especially the law, and try not to incite a beating or tazering, or at worst your death. Google Brandon Backe H2O bar incident, I think they even roughed up and threw the head FEMA guy in a cop car(not really a bad thing, in retrospect)
*This is a disaster situation,so expect to be on your own, have some first aid supplies. After an evac, come back with enough supplies to take car of you and your family or helpers or workers, don't just pick up a Big Gulp on the way down to check out the devastation, crap won't be open.
*Heard reports of looting, but none on my street, still slept on the floor with the .45. Like mentioned before, never seen town so DARK, wasn't really concerned, after 8:00pm curfew only other guy in my area staying the night was a couple houses down and a lunatic, but he probably thought the same thing about me.
*Be prepared, have a plan, keep car tanks full as possible during hurricane season(folks learned this the hard way during Rita) and start and run your generators once a month, preferably running the carb dry(turn off gas shut-off valve while running).
*Didn't encounter any zombies, but my buddy said the crack-heads were drawn to his light and generator noise(sustained no flooding, so he was just camping out at home). He said it made him feel slighty uncomfortable and increased his security issues.
Once again excellent thread, and hope my longwindedness didn't put anyone to sleep.

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by raptor » Sat Sep 17, 2011 7:12 pm

Surfnbob good post. Thanks for the information. When you get a chance please go by the introduction thread and introduce yourself. :D

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Garyedge » Mon Oct 24, 2011 11:44 am

were there any civilians running check points/fortify neighborhoods?
ive seen some talk about that on other forums/youtube personalities and wondered if you or others did this
and if this was a really horrible idea?
Do you think that the police/national guard would have just rolled that type of activity?
"Our dog is a good hunter/ killer too. He has taken ground hogs before and could likely land something much larger if he could get a hold of it. The difference is that he is doesn't play psychological games with his prey. He kills it, eats it and rolls around in the remains. Just like people" - Blacksmith

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by raptor » Mon Oct 24, 2011 11:57 am

Garyedge wrote:were there any civilians running check points/fortify neighborhoods?
ive seen some talk about that on other forums/youtube personalities and wondered if you or others did this
and if this was a really horrible idea?
Do you think that the police/national guard would have just rolled that type of activity?
I am not sure I know what you mean.

Initially there were very few people around and many people already had their hurricane shutters up for the storm. So most of the homes were already "fortified" in that sense.

There were the very common "You Loot We shoot" kind of signs that you see for every storm.

In the flooded areas there were check points and patrols but no one would run a check point. They would simply find another way around or do what I did... talk my way through them.

One thing to keep in mind is that many stories you see on Youtube are greatly exaggerated. I have heard stories of people who fought off wave upon wave of rapists/zombies/alligators/etc. I believe very few of them. That said there was a lot of chaos, misinformation and rumors circulating. Even today it is difficult to sort reality from fiction.


You should read this thread for some more information on the subject.

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... =6&t=60213" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Garyedge » Mon Oct 24, 2011 12:06 pm

When I say I running check points I meant like setting them up, manning them and protecting a neighborhood.
And when I said fortifying I meant anything form the loot/shoot signs to running patrols and that sort of thing.

edited for crappy grammar
"Our dog is a good hunter/ killer too. He has taken ground hogs before and could likely land something much larger if he could get a hold of it. The difference is that he is doesn't play psychological games with his prey. He kills it, eats it and rolls around in the remains. Just like people" - Blacksmith

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Re: Katrina Experiences - Note this is very long

Post by Garyedge » Mon Oct 24, 2011 12:13 pm

I guess the reason I'm asking is because i wanted to know if you ran into this, and how you handled it compared to say LEO/NG.
And how did the authorities handle this?

Edit, PS thanks for both the original post and the link you provided, very very informative
"Our dog is a good hunter/ killer too. He has taken ground hogs before and could likely land something much larger if he could get a hold of it. The difference is that he is doesn't play psychological games with his prey. He kills it, eats it and rolls around in the remains. Just like people" - Blacksmith

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