Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Jobs

Discuss those "what if" or "what would you do" scenarios you've been wondering about.

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by Dabster » Sat Sep 09, 2017 1:57 pm

This doesn't seem so bad...

https://youtu.be/j4IFNKYmLa8
Shiney side out... Shiney side out...

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:16 pm

AI Takeover

Fasicnating read. Too long to post with all the links.

Death to robots! :mrgreen:

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:20 pm

From NPR: 'World Without Mind': How Tech Companies Pose An Existential Threat
'World Without Mind': How Tech Companies Pose An Existential Threat By Ari Shapiro

Journalist Franklin Foer worries that we're all losing our minds as big tech companies infiltrate every aspect of our lives.

In his new book, World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech, Foer compares the way we feel about technology now to the way people felt about pre-made foods, like TV dinners, when they were first invented.

"And we thought that they were brilliant because they did away with pots and pans — we didn't have to go to the store to go shopping every day — and then we woke up 50 years later and realize that these products had been basically engineered to make us fat," Foer says. "And I worry that the same thing is happening now to the things that we ingest through our mind."

Interview Highlights

On why tech companies' control of the market is problematic

They pose as these neutral marketplaces, yet when they have their own things to sell, they give them special advantages. We saw this with Yelp and Google, where Yelp was this great way to get recommendations about what restaurant to go to, and it used to be when you type in a restaurant name into Google, the Yelp review was the first thing that came up. Well, Google saw that this was a good business to be in and so they started to publish their own user reviews of restaurants, and suddenly, those leap-frogged over Yelp.

World Without Mind-The Existential Threat of Big Tech by Franklin Foer Hardcover, 257 pages

And so I think we accept these platforms as being neutral, they pose as neutral. Even if you look at their looks — a search engine seems like it's a mechanical thing, but it's not a mechanical thing. It imposes the economic interests of these companies on the platform, and it imposes their values on the platform as well.

On how tech companies' algorithms are not impartial

All these algorithms are constructed by human beings to serve human purposes. They're systems, and these systems are devised in order to create certain outcomes. And so the fact that they're so invisible, I think actually enhances their power because most people have the dimmest awareness, if any awareness at all, that Facebook is being patterned to try to give them some information above others.

Right now, Facebook is obsessed with promoting video because that's where money is to be had. So right now, Facebook is loading up your News Feed in order to give you much more video. And there are all these media companies — I bet NPR is one of them — that makes certain commitments to certain editorial processes and investments in certain editorial apparatus in order to achieve certain results on Facebook because Facebook brings a lot of traffic. It's where users are. And then when Facebook, somewhat capriciously, decides to change its strategy, it hurts all of the organizations that are dependent upon Facebook.

Disclosure: Facebook pays NPR and other leading news organizations to produce live video streams that run on the site.

On why the threat of big tech companies is an existential one

If you're of a certain age, you have a good appreciation for the ways in which we've all become a little bit cyborg. I grew up using maps and having a sense of direction, and now I have a phone. I used to try to remember numbers, and now I ... can just call them up instantly. And that's great. But what's happening right now is that we're in a phase of human evolution where we're merging with machines.

It's not necessarily a bad thing, but we're not just merging with machines. We've been merging with tools since the beginning of human evolution and arguably, that's one of the things that makes us human beings. But what we're merging with [now] are machines that are run by companies that act as filters for the way in which we interact and process the world.

And so the values of those companies become our values. We become dependent on these companies in a way in which we've never really been dependent on companies before. And this could all work out in a utopian, beautiful sort of way, or it could unfold as a dystopian, sci-fi nightmare. And I just think that because the stakes are so high, we have to be extra skeptical.

On the lack of regulation to limit the influence of tech companies

The Internet was invented in an age when our entire approach to regulation has been extremely lax, and so you'd think, "OK, there might be a law on the books that governs how these corporations can handle our data."

Well, you could kind of pull pieces of [legal] code ... that shows maybe instances where companies could potentially cross boundaries, but there really isn't a coherent approach that we have to regulating these companies, and so they have an incredible amount of freedom. ...

There's this proud American tradition of worrying about the power of communication companies. That going all the way back to the founding, we've tried to limit the power of monopolies that played a role in our democracy. And so even with the U.S. Postal Service to take the first communications monopoly in the United States, we didn't let them get into the telegraph business. And when Western Union got a monopoly in the telegraph business, we were careful not to let them get into telephony.

And this extends even into our own era back up into the Clinton administration when they put pressure on Microsoft, and really hemmed them in it came to the browser. And were it not for the case that the United States brought against Microsoft, Google probably would've been strangled in its crib.

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:05 am

From CNBC: Head of A.I. at Google slams the kind of ‘A.I. apocalypse’ fear-mongering Elon Musk has been doing
Head of A.I. at Google slams the kind of ‘A.I. apocalypse’ fear-mongering Elon Musk has been doing By Catherine Clifford

Billionaire tech titan Elon Musk says the global race for artificial intelligence will cause World War III and that governments will take the technology "at gunpoint" if necessary. The Tesla and SpaceX chief has said robots will be able to do everything better than humans can. And he has said "AI is a fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization" that poses "vastly more risk" than North Korea.

The dire warnings have gotten a tremendous amount of attention. As one of the most high-profile entrepreneurs in the country, his words hold weight for many. When Musk tweets, people pay attention.

And yet, predictions about a dangerous future with artificial intelligence are grossly unhelpful, according to John Giannandrea, the senior vice president of engineering at Google, who is in charge of the tech giant's AI efforts.

"I just object to the hype and the sort of sound bites that some people have been making," says Giannandrea, speaking at TechCrunch Disrupt SF on Tuesday. "I am definitely not worried about the AI apocalypse."


The Google exec did not mention Musk by name, though the Silicon Valley titan's predictions have been frequent and some of the most severe. But Giannandrea says such fear-mongering is based on too many assumptions.

"There is just a huge amount of unwarranted hype around AI right now," said Giannandrea. "Machine learning and artificial intelligence is extremely important and will revolutionize many vertical industries, and I am very excited by the progress we are making, but it is very practical and applied progress. And I think what we are doing is building tools, like, say, the Google Search engine, that make you more productive.

"This leap into — somebody is going to build a superhuman intelligence and then there is going to be all these ethical issues — is unwarranted and borderline irresponsible because people who don't understand the technology get very concerned rather than focusing on the positive effects."
"I AM DEFINITELY NOT WORRIED ABOUT THE AI APOCALYPSE."
-John Giannandrea, Google's AI chief

And Giannandrea believes that there is significant benefit to human productivity and potential with artificial intelligence.

"Computers are incredibly powerful but they are also pretty dumb, and I think we need to work hard to make them fulfill the potential that they have and so that means teaching them to be smarter," Giannandrea says. "Technology should augment the human intellect not replace it. It should be a powerful tool to help us think better, and I think that is really the journey we are on."

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg is also optimistic about the future of AI and has similarly chastised dire warnings about a scary future.

That optimistic view of the potential of AI is driving Google's plans for the future: CEO Sundar Pichai has called for Google to be an "AI-first" company, according to Giannandrea. Google will increasingly build products that depend on AI technology.

In the future, Giannandrea expects a world of "pervasive computing," meaning that instead of carrying around computing power in our pocket in the form of a smartphone, it will be built into the infrastructure all around us. And that pervasive computing will be personalized. Google Home, a voice-activated speaker assistant, is a harbinger of what is to come, says Giannandrea.

While tech behemoths are aggressively pursuing AI, Giannandrea says it is a space ripe with opportunity for individual entrepreneurs. Google makes much of its research and data available publicly for engineers to access and build off of.

"For the start-up community this is a super exciting time," says Giannandrea. Investors are especially interested in dumping venture capital dollars into health-care start-ups, he has observed.

The AI chief is excited to see computers get to the point where they can process and analyze written language.

"One of the most exciting research areas for me is in language understanding. I think that is kind of the holy grail for applied artificial intelligence. We are surrounded by documents and websites and news articles, literally hundreds of thousands published every minute, and the question is how to make sense of all this data," says Giannandrea. "Today, computers can't 'read' in the sense of read and understand and summarize a document, and so I think progress in that area is one that I am really excited about."
Folks, this is an example of the kind of thinking that builds extermination camps.

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by flybynight » Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:09 am

MPMalloy wrote:From CNBC: Head of A.I. at Google slams the kind of ‘A.I. apocalypse’ fear-mongering Elon Musk has been doing
Head of A.I. at Google slams the kind of ‘A.I. apocalypse’ fear-mongering Elon Musk has been doing By Catherine Clifford

Billionaire tech titan Elon Musk says the global race for artificial intelligence will cause World War III and that governments will take the technology "at gunpoint" if necessary. The Tesla and SpaceX chief has said robots will be able to do everything better than humans can. And he has said "AI is a fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization" that poses "vastly more risk" than North Korea.

The dire warnings have gotten a tremendous amount of attention. As one of the most high-profile entrepreneurs in the country, his words hold weight for many. When Musk tweets, people pay attention.

And yet, predictions about a dangerous future with artificial intelligence are grossly unhelpful, according to John Giannandrea, the senior vice president of engineering at Google, who is in charge of the tech giant's AI efforts.

"I just object to the hype and the sort of sound bites that some people have been making," says Giannandrea, speaking at TechCrunch Disrupt SF on Tuesday. "I am definitely not worried about the AI apocalypse."


The Google exec did not mention Musk by name, though the Silicon Valley titan's predictions have been frequent and some of the most severe. But Giannandrea says such fear-mongering is based on too many assumptions.

"There is just a huge amount of unwarranted hype around AI right now," said Giannandrea. "Machine learning and artificial intelligence is extremely important and will revolutionize many vertical industries, and I am very excited by the progress we are making, but it is very practical and applied progress. And I think what we are doing is building tools, like, say, the Google Search engine, that make you more productive.

"This leap into — somebody is going to build a superhuman intelligence and then there is going to be all these ethical issues — is unwarranted and borderline irresponsible because people who don't understand the technology get very concerned rather than focusing on the positive effects."
"I AM DEFINITELY NOT WORRIED ABOUT THE AI APOCALYPSE."
-John Giannandrea, Google's AI chief

And Giannandrea believes that there is significant benefit to human productivity and potential with artificial intelligence.

"Computers are incredibly powerful but they are also pretty dumb, and I think we need to work hard to make them fulfill the potential that they have and so that means teaching them to be smarter," Giannandrea says. "Technology should augment the human intellect not replace it. It should be a powerful tool to help us think better, and I think that is really the journey we are on."

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg is also optimistic about the future of AI and has similarly chastised dire warnings about a scary future.

That optimistic view of the potential of AI is driving Google's plans for the future: CEO Sundar Pichai has called for Google to be an "AI-first" company, according to Giannandrea. Google will increasingly build products that depend on AI technology.

In the future, Giannandrea expects a world of "pervasive computing," meaning that instead of carrying around computing power in our pocket in the form of a smartphone, it will be built into the infrastructure all around us. And that pervasive computing will be personalized. Google Home, a voice-activated speaker assistant, is a harbinger of what is to come, says Giannandrea.

While tech behemoths are aggressively pursuing AI, Giannandrea says it is a space ripe with opportunity for individual entrepreneurs. Google makes much of its research and data available publicly for engineers to access and build off of.

"For the start-up community this is a super exciting time," says Giannandrea. Investors are especially interested in dumping venture capital dollars into health-care start-ups, he has observed.

The AI chief is excited to see computers get to the point where they can process and analyze written language.

"One of the most exciting research areas for me is in language understanding. I think that is kind of the holy grail for applied artificial intelligence. We are surrounded by documents and websites and news articles, literally hundreds of thousands published every minute, and the question is how to make sense of all this data," says Giannandrea. "Today, computers can't 'read' in the sense of read and understand and summarize a document, and so I think progress in that area is one that I am really excited about."
Folks, this is an example of the kind of thinking that builds extermination camps.
Head of A.I. at Google slams the kind of ‘A.I. apocalypse’ fear-mongering Elon Musk has been doing
Image
As of now I bet you got me wrong

John Titor was right

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by raptor » Fri Sep 22, 2017 12:03 pm

MPMalloy wrote:From CNBC: Head of A.I. at Google slams the kind of ‘A.I. apocalypse’ fear-mongering Elon Musk has been doing
Head of A.I. at Google slams the kind of ‘A.I. apocalypse’ fear-mongering Elon Musk has been doing By Catherine Clifford
I heard a rumor that John Giannandrea's nickname is Forbin.




BTW I like the guy with the cigarette in this scene. If it were me I would like to think I would do something similar, albeit with my ever present glass of ice coffee. :D

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by woodsghost » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:28 pm

I chatted with a friend who works with AI in a rather large company. He is not concerned at the moment because AI is not really intelligent. Leastwise, not the stuff he is working with. At the moment AI is just very sophisticated (and sometimes not very sophisticated) If/Then/Else statements.

There can be sophisticated statistical equations entered in the If/Then/Else statements, but at the end of the day, there are still only pre-programmed responses the machine is capable of. Machine learning can occur, but a machine needs to be programmed how to learn first. Better programming leads to better learning, but human brains are orders of magnitude better at learning and adapting. Further, machines can easily be fooled by the wide array of unexpected exceptions to a rule. The nature of an If/Then/Else statement is that the rules must be followed, while a human can understand a broader context and exceptions (such as a red Stop sign with a red barn in the background confusing a machine as to what it is looking at and causing it to ignore the sign).

He agrees that if we ever saw a more generalized AI like we see in the movies, we would be in serious trouble. But right now there are real limits on what can be accomplished and what a machine is actually capable of.

Another friend who has assisted in electronics research talked about how the nature of electronics and binary language has a real limiting effect on AI. We would need chips capable of processing more than a 1 & 0 to be able to create the processing speed and depth of programming necessary for a more generalized AI to even exist. Now, research is being done in that direction, so time will tell if it can get out of the research phase and into a production phase. But right now I *think* we are close to the limit on how small and fast we can make processors and chips. If I understand correctly, at this point to get incredible processing speed we have to add more units rather than better chips.

Further, I think a different coding language would have to be developed and different chips and processors will have to exist for AI to become a problem. While I"m saying all that, there is research on one of those problems, and if chips ever change, we will see someone come up with different coding language to take advantage of the new capability. So who knows what the future holds.

Another point that was raised by my friend working with AI is that the debt bomb could go off before we have the capability to make a generalized AI. We have no idea which will happen first, so prepare for both. :gonk:

Just sharing some conversations I"ve had.
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:36 pm

Thank you for your post, Woods. It was very helpful. :)

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Mon Sep 25, 2017 8:27 am

From RT: Putin seems unconvinced AI won’t ‘eat us’
Putin seems unconvinced AI won’t ‘eat us’ Published time: 21 Sep, 2017 17:20 Edited time: 22 Sep, 2017 10:08

Putin seems unconvinced AI won’t ‘eat us’ © Sergey Guneev / Sputnik

Vladimir Putin may secretly be on the side of Elon Musk in their indirect debate over the threat posed by artificial intelligence (AI). As Arkady Volozh, the head of Yandex, pitched him on the technology’s potential, the Russian president inquired about when AI ‘will eat us’.
The question seemed to baffle the head of Russia’s biggest tech firm, who was giving Putin a tour on the company’s Moscow HQ on Thursday.

“I hope never”, he replied after taking a pause to gather his thoughts. “It’s not the first machine to be better than humans at something. An excavator digs better than we do with a shovel. But we don’t get eaten by excavators. A car moves faster than we do…”

But Putin seemed unconvinced. “They don’t think,” he remarked.

Volozh acknowledged that it was true and scrambled back to his speech on AI’s merits.

AI seems to have become a sort of fad in the Russian government lately. Putin, when asked earlier this month by a group of kids about who would rule the world in the future, said it will be whichever country manages to perfect artificial intelligence.

The remark was taken as an ominous sign by some people in the West while Elon Musk, an outspoken advocate of restricting AI development, warned competition between nations in this area may lead to World War III.

AI, or more precisely, self-learning algorithms, are at the core of modern tech firms like Yandex, Google or Facebook. An increasing number of online services rely on such algorithms including search engines, automated translation between languages, image enhancement and targeting of advertising – which of course pays for all of this.

As the technology matures, it is being adapted for ‘real world’ applications like self-driving cars or even the optimization of centuries-old manufacturing technology like metal casting, Volozh told Putin during the tour.

However there is concern that such algorithms and robots controlled by them would make millions of human employees redundant over the next couple of decades, creating a large force of disenfranchised people. A debate also rages over whether humans should entrust AI with tasks of an ethical nature, such as the use of lethal weapons.

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by NamelessStain » Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:17 am

Robot farmers, another job.

Link: https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech ... st-barley/
Robot farmers have successfully planted and harvested barley by themselves

Robot-ran farms have the potential to increase efficiency in the agriculture industry.

Humans have been cultivating plants for some 10,000 years and, for much of that time, we’ve used beasts of burden to help tend the fields. Just last century, humans turned from animal strength to machine power, leading to huge leaps in agricultural efficiency and scale. Over the past few years, farms have deployed emerging technologies like drones and autonomous driving systems to make the farmers’ job even less strenuous — but human hands were still needed throughout the process.

Now, researchers at Harper Adams University and agricultural company Precision Decisions have removed humans from the farm entirely in a project called Hands Free Hectare. From planting to tending and harvesting, no human stepped foot on the acre and a half barley farm in rural England. It was all done by robot farmers.

“There’s been a focus in recent years on making farming more precise, but the larger machines that we’re using are not compatible with this method of working,” Jonathan Gill, one of the researchers involved in the project, said in a statement. “They’re also so heavy that they’re damaging farmers’ soils. If combines in the future were similar to the size of the combine we used in this project, which was a little ‘Sampo combine’ with a header unit of only two meters, it would allow more precise yield maps to be created. They would also be much lighter machines.”

Among the tasks assigned to the autonomous vehicles and drones were drilling channels to precise depths for barley seeds to be planted; applying specific amounts of fungicides, herbicides, and fertilizers; and, finally, harvesting the crops once they were ready.

“This project aimed to prove that there’s no technological reason why a field can’t be farmed without humans working the land directly now and we’ve done that,” said Martin Abell, from Precision Decisions. “We set out to identify the opportunities for farming and to prove that it’s possible to autonomously farm the land, and that’s been the great success of the project.”

Although the autonomous work systems were freshly developed for these tasks, the machine used to harvest the barley was 25 years old and still performed better than the tractor used for planting, according to the researchers.

The team plans to repeat the experiment again with a winter crop. But first, they will brew a batch of beer with the spring harvest. Cheers to that!
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by ZombieGranny » Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:13 am

Personally I'm not worried about robot farmers, that's practically what we have now.
One guy in a harvester behind 2 robot harvesters running them all.
It's just called agribusiness.
Not going to hurt the "family farm"... if they are still around they have found their niche market.
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by w3rdtoyamama » Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:15 am

Sit back and relax
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:20 pm

Robots suck ass.

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by raptor » Tue Sep 26, 2017 3:17 pm

MPMalloy wrote:Robots suck ass.
:clap: Now be candid and tell us what you really think. :D

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by NamelessStain » Wed Sep 27, 2017 6:38 am

MPMalloy wrote:Robots suck ass.
/using the psychiatrist voice

"And how does that make you feel?"

uh.. huh.
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 27, 2017 7:48 am

I don't know about the rest of you, well, those of you who aren't outright robot-lovers, but I am in this for the species.

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by Asymetryczna » Wed Sep 27, 2017 8:02 am

Seven Species of robots, and how they were created:
https://www.ted.com/talks/dennis_hong_m ... s_of_robot
It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see.
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 27, 2017 8:07 am

According to the World Economic Forum's (WEF) latest global competitiveness report, global economies remain at risk from further shock and are "ill-prepared" for the next wave of "automation and robotization."-(CNBC)

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by raptor » Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:29 pm

Asymetryczna wrote:Seven Species of robots, and how they were created:
https://www.ted.com/talks/dennis_hong_m ... s_of_robot
That is a great video!

Thank you!

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by 12_Gauge_Chimp » Wed Sep 27, 2017 6:13 pm

MPMalloy wrote:I don't know about the rest of you, well, those of you who aren't outright robot-lovers, but I am in this for the species.
One thing that always bugged me about those "killer robot" movies is why no one thinks to grab a Super Soaker or even a garden hose and short-circuit the bucket of bolts and processors chasing them. :lol:


Maybe I need to make a call to SyFy and see if I can't pitch a Saturday afternoon movie to them about this. :idea:

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 27, 2017 7:32 pm

12_Gauge_Chimp wrote:Maybe I need to make a call to SyFy and see if I can't pitch a Saturday afternoon movie to them about this. :idea:
It would be the kids who figure that out. :D

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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by 12_Gauge_Chimp » Wed Sep 27, 2017 8:56 pm

MPMalloy wrote:
12_Gauge_Chimp wrote:Maybe I need to make a call to SyFy and see if I can't pitch a Saturday afternoon movie to them about this. :idea:
It would be the kids who figure that out. :D
It'd be a short movie then. :lol:

Movie opens with a family being chased by a humanoid robot around their house.

Kid:" Mom, Dad, I don't get why we're all running away from this thing. Watch this."

*grabs garden hose and shorts out the evil android*

Parents stand there, mouths wide open in shock.

Kid:" if you'll all excuse me, there's a Simpsons marathon on TV I want to watch."

Credits roll. :D

MPMalloy
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:19 pm

12_Gauge_Chimp wrote:
MPMalloy wrote:
12_Gauge_Chimp wrote:Maybe I need to make a call to SyFy and see if I can't pitch a Saturday afternoon movie to them about this. :idea:
It would be the kids who figure that out. :D
It'd be a short movie then. :lol:

Movie opens with a family being chased by a humanoid robot around their house.

Kid:" Mom, Dad, I don't get why we're all running away from this thing. Watch this."

*grabs garden hose and shorts out the evil android*

Parents stand there, mouths wide open in shock.

Kid:" if you'll all excuse me, there's a Simpsons marathon on TV I want to watch."

Credits roll. :D
:lol:

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NamelessStain
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Re: Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Job

Post by NamelessStain » Thu Sep 28, 2017 6:22 am

Sadly, Military Grade has a whole other level of meaning. 99.999999999% sure that super soakers wouldn't work, but hey, go for it. :)

Also, any other alien race that arrives will be VASTLY superior technologically. Think modern military vs
Napoleonic wars.
jnathan wrote:Since we lost some posts due to some database work I'll just put this here for posterity.
Q wrote:Buckle up

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