Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by andygates » Tue Oct 19, 2010 4:38 pm

I dunno about France but here, we have our own fuel depot onsite. We can keep delivering the druuugs even if everyone else is off the road. I imagine other essential services are similar.

The fuel blockade is interesting. It started (in the UK at least) as a protest *by* drivers, but the tactic is so invasive and dramatic that it's been adopted here in France and also by environmental protestors. It's a fine example of finding a dependency and tickling it.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Lynxian » Fri Oct 22, 2010 5:57 am

Browning 35 wrote:I lived in Germany for almost four years as a kid (80's - Army Brat) and I made it to France several times and most of their 'super'-markets seem small in comparison with ours.

I'm just wondering how long it'll take for the average person over there to run out of food.

Is the French government going to truck food into the stores to keep everything going since many truckers are on strike?

Is that even possible and are the protesters blocking the streets off?

If food and other items necessary for daily life (meds and whatnot) can't get in that's really gonna suck for the average person in the not too distant future.

I wonder if the people will blame the government or those on strike.

It's kind of a weird situation and I'm just kinda curious, any know of any previous examples of this that weren't violent?

I know the Ulster Workers Council and that the Ulster Paramilitaries had a successful strike in 1974 that ended power sharing in Northern Ireland (LINK - *Click*) for awhile, but that situation was quite a bit different in that it wasn't exactly peaceful.
Not having seen American supermarkets, it's hard for me to say what you US folks find large and what small. Having said that, I have seen supermarkets in Australia and I think it's a bit similar to those I've seen on TV, in the US. So; yeah, European supermarkets tend to be smaller. A bit of a trend i've noticed;

England has smaller supermarkets, but a lot of them spread around. In between are a few medium sized ones. The Netherlands is much like England, but less of 'em. Germany has the somewhat bigger ones, but those are spread around a bit more. France - from what I've seen in Paris - has lots of tiny ones. Really, even by Dutch standards they were small and cramped. And yes; French people do seem to pick up lots of fresh things on their way home from work. This is pretty normal in other European countries too (as someone already mentioned; everything's very closeby, anyway), but the French really do go daily.

I would like to point out one important point, though; no matter how small a supermarket is, it's not the size of the supermarket that determines how much food people have stocked in their home; it's how much they buy and how they keep their pantry up to date. The supermarket I go to each week is small by US standards, but I do have a proper stocked pantry. (Should be enough for at least two weeks.)

As for French rioting: no shit. When aren't they burning cars? Last time I went to Euro Disney some pissed off workers wanted their way so badly, they threatened the state with terrorist attacks. (Late '90s.) I had an odd surprise when, on the way back, we saw Gendarmes with MP5 and P90 submachineguns on Paris Gare du Nord train station, patrolling.

Lastly; in Europe, you may protest, but when you get in the way of everyday life, the typical European government will have no problem brute-forcing their way through a protest. England used the army to escort oil trucks a few years ago, the Dutch (again, late 90's) considered using the navy against fishermen closing off all our ports. (They were pissed about new EU rules regarding fishing. Something with quotums, if I remember correctly.) So meh. Protests will end, people will get what they need before they run out. We'll probably hear some stories of police brutality in the days to come. Oh well...
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by the_alias » Fri Oct 22, 2010 6:02 am

As for French rioting: no shit. When aren't they burning cars?
:lol:
I love all the Euro/UK members telling it how it is in this thread.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by absw » Fri Oct 22, 2010 6:05 am

the_alias wrote:
As for French rioting: no shit. When aren't they burning cars?
:lol:
I love all the Euro/UK members telling it how it is in this thread.

It /is/ practically their national sport.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by UrbanConquest » Fri Oct 22, 2010 7:56 am

?
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by solorsix » Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:20 am

Lol, all that wasted work on rioting... why doesn't france just do what the US private sector does? They could lower the age of retirement to 60... who cares; because after 20 to 25 years of your dedicated service they will just abolish your position or force you to retire early with limited benefits and if you don't threaten you may have no benefits.
Oh I forgot, in france you can be a complete fail and it still takes 4 years for your company to fire you.. :roll:

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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by phil_in_cs » Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:30 am

UrbanConquest wrote:I don't blame them for striking. Australia lifted it's retirement age to 67 and it will keep moving back over the next decade. Essentially most people will die before reaching retirement unless they have had well paying jobs and weren't taken to the cleaners by collapsing banks and insurance/superannuation companies.
a couple of points.
1. People staying in the work place longer means less jobs to go round.
2. If you loose you job in your 60's who is going to employ you? I have enough trouble finding a job and I only just turned 50.

The UK have announced plans to put off thousands of government employee's and cut funding to public amenities such as health,police and education. This is just the start of things.
This isn't a forum to discuss the political grievances they have. Discussing how the strikes could effect you if they occurred in your area is a good subject.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by UrbanConquest » Fri Oct 22, 2010 6:28 pm

/
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by shrapnel » Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:14 pm

Because your comment was political in nature. :roll:
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Browning 35 » Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:48 pm

Lynxian wrote:
Browning 35 wrote:I lived in Germany for almost four years as a kid (80's - Army Brat) and I made it to France several times and most of their 'super'-markets seem small in comparison with ours.

I'm just wondering how long it'll take for the average person over there to run out of food.

Is the French government going to truck food into the stores to keep everything going since many truckers are on strike?

Is that even possible and are the protesters blocking the streets off?

If food and other items necessary for daily life (meds and whatnot) can't get in that's really gonna suck for the average person in the not too distant future.

I wonder if the people will blame the government or those on strike.

It's kind of a weird situation and I'm just kinda curious, any know of any previous examples of this that weren't violent?

I know the Ulster Workers Council and that the Ulster Paramilitaries had a successful strike in 1974 that ended power sharing in Northern Ireland (LINK - *Click*) for awhile, but that situation was quite a bit different in that it wasn't exactly peaceful.
Not having seen American supermarkets, it's hard for me to say what you US folks find large and what small.
Well all this would be in one store....a Super Wal-Mart. This would be 'big' to most Americans.

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I'm also leaving out the automotive/tools/paint section, the lawn/garden section and the sporting goods/fishing/hunting section (couldn't find pictures of those areas in a quick search). So those places are pretty big.
A bit of a trend i've noticed;

England has smaller supermarkets, but a lot of them spread around. In between are a few medium sized ones. The Netherlands is much like England, but less of 'em. Germany has the somewhat bigger ones, but those are spread around a bit more. France - from what I've seen in Paris - has lots of tiny ones. Really, even by Dutch standards they were small and cramped. And yes; French people do seem to pick up lots of fresh things on their way home from work. This is pretty normal in other European countries too (as someone already mentioned; everything's very closeby, anyway), but the French really do go daily.

I would like to point out one important point, though; no matter how small a supermarket is, it's not the size of the supermarket that determines how much food people have stocked in their home; it's how much they buy and how they keep their pantry up to date. The supermarket I go to each week is small by US standards, but I do have a proper stocked pantry. (Should be enough for at least two weeks.)
Yeah, I guess things are pretty much the same as I remember then.
As for French rioting: no shit. When aren't they burning cars? Last time I went to Euro Disney some pissed off workers wanted their way so badly, they threatened the state with terrorist attacks. (Late '90s.) I had an odd surprise when, on the way back, we saw Gendarmes with MP5 and P90 submachineguns on Paris Gare du Nord train station, patrolling.
Yeah, pretty much a national past-time.
Lastly; in Europe, you may protest, but when you get in the way of everyday life, the typical European government will have no problem brute-forcing their way through a protest. England used the army to escort oil trucks a few years ago, the Dutch (again, late 90's) considered using the navy against fishermen closing off all our ports. (They were pissed about new EU rules regarding fishing. Something with quotums, if I remember correctly.) So meh. Protests will end, people will get what they need before they run out. We'll probably hear some stories of police brutality in the days to come. Oh well...
You think so?

I always thought it was a last resort for the French Government. Remember those rioters from a couple years ago in Paris after that Arab Youth was killed by the police? They let that shit go on forever. I dunno, maybe they don't show them cracking heads and shooting rioters on the news over here though.

American news is like that, they tend to leave quite a bit out while British and European news reports tend to be more graphic from what I've noticed.
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And don't get me started on pandas!

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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Stercutus » Sat Oct 23, 2010 11:23 am

It appears mostly over.

The police were called out, broke the striker lines and the government ordered workers to work. Don't know French law so not sure how they can order people to work. In America we call that forced labor.
This order, known in France as a "requisition", can be issued by French authorities when they believe a strike poses a threat to public order. It compels strikers to return to work, under threat of prosecution.
French police have forcibly lifted a blockade on the main refinery supplying fuel to Paris as polls show the majority of French people support the strikes despite petrol shortages on the eve of national holidays.
French courts have taken took a hard line on young people involved in rioting and vandalism. Judges in Lyon, Nanterre and Lille, where students have been involved in angry clashes with police, have handed down custodial sentences to youngsters arrested for violence, vandalism and looting. The interior minister claimed 2,257 youngsters had been arrested since France's lycéens (high school pupils) entered the protests on 12 October.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Lynxian » Sat Oct 23, 2010 1:44 pm

Browning 35 wrote:Well all this would be in one store....a Super Wal-Mart. This would be 'big' to most Americans.

(...snipped pictures for post length...)

I'm also leaving out the automotive/tools/paint section, the lawn/garden section and the sporting goods/fishing/hunting section (couldn't find pictures of those areas in a quick search). So those places are pretty big.
Holy crap, those are big! Massive, even! You need a golf cart to get around! Man, if all those super walmarts are that big, you'd think the American obesity problem would be less of a problem. :| Um, yeah, I can see European supermarkets being called small by comparison.
Browning 35 wrote:
Lastly; in Europe, you may protest, but when you get in the way of everyday life, the typical European government will have no problem brute-forcing their way through a protest. England used the army to escort oil trucks a few years ago, the Dutch (again, late 90's) considered using the navy against fishermen closing off all our ports. (They were pissed about new EU rules regarding fishing. Something with quotums, if I remember correctly.) So meh. Protests will end, people will get what they need before they run out. We'll probably hear some stories of police brutality in the days to come. Oh well...
You think so?

I always thought it was a last resort for the French Government. Remember those rioters from a couple years ago in Paris after that Arab Youth was killed by the police? They let that shit go on forever. I dunno, maybe they don't show them cracking heads and shooting rioters on the news over here though.

American news is like that, they tend to leave quite a bit out while British and European news reports tend to be more graphic from what I've noticed.
Yes, our news is a lot more graphic at times. It's not uncommon to see blown off limbs at the six or eight o clock news. Usually when the news here gives out a shock warning (rare), then it's best if you believe them.

And the brute forcing I mentioned; it's rare for police here to use their firearms, even moreso during riots. Where it may be acceptable to, for instance, use rubber bullets in the US, it's totally unheard of in Europe. (Well, not everywhere, of course, but it's very rare all the same.) Where it's unheard of in the US (against the law, even) to use military and National Garde usage is rare (and, from what I've gathered, usually doesn't happen until a few people have died) against the populace, European governments will have no problems with that. In our past it has happened multiple times that the army went in to quench riots. When this happends, the riots usually end within hours, because when armed forces get sent, they get permission to shoot. Still, it's not as if it's an enjoyable past time amongst our policians to send out the troops against citizens, so usually our riot police will get a lot more down and dirty than, from what I've gathered, US riot police would go. European riot police will more quickly use their batons, tear gas, water cannon, dogs and horses than their American counterparts and it's not unheard of for riot police to fight for hours with rioters. This may sound ridicule, but this strong determination is partially there because the alternative (sending in the troops) is a whole lot less appealing. Also, European countries tend to have a bit more of a 'meh' approach regarding police brutality during riots. While officially not the standpoint, unofficially there kind of is the agreement that if you're dumb enough to participate in a riot, you should shut the fuck up when you're on the pavement with a baton in your kidney and a dog near your privates.

Lastly; I do not know a whole lot about France (I reckon it's a country best avoided; wind always seems to be blowing from that general direction) but know enough about the sensitivity of their past; like most European countries they've had a rich colonial history which has resulted in a lot of immigrants in their country. The list of immigrants increased in the '60's and '70's with people from non-colonial countries. But because of the colonial history, it's very hard for them - due to political correctness as a result of said sensitivity - to be tough against (former) immigrants (or their decendants). Simply because they're afraid of being seen as racist or the aggressive colonist. Hence why the banliue riots of France (mainly Paris) from a few years back was handled with relatively little violence (though their riot police still got in a lot of tough fights, mind you): it's too difficult to send in authority figures with orders to shoot (be it real or rubber bullets) without looking like a bigotish colonial arse. Had those riots been commited by middle class white-skinned bastards, the TV footage would've looked very different. Thankfully for the French government these recent strikes (with accompanying riots) were commited by those of all colors, so it was hard for people to make them look like racist assholes. Result: quick, effective and, at times, hard police actions.

Having typed all this I hope it didn't come off as political; I'm just trying to explain (my view) of these recent French riots and subsequent police response.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by shrapnel » Sat Oct 23, 2010 2:28 pm

I have nothing insightful to say about the riots, but a visiting British friend of mine, upon walking into her first Super WalMart, was so astonished and mildly horrified that she had to to take a while to regroup and chill out.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Browning 35 » Sat Oct 23, 2010 2:40 pm

Lynxian wrote:Holy crap, those are big! Massive, even! You need a golf cart to get around! Man, if all those super walmarts are that big, you'd think the American obesity problem would be less of a problem. :| Um, yeah, I can see European supermarkets being called small by comparison.
Yeah, they're pretty big. Even the average sized markets are generally larger than some of the 'Big' ones that I saw in Germany, France, Holland, Belguim etc etc. I don't know if that directly always translates into people in the US having more food on hand in their homes in case of a riot or other civil disturbance, but from going into the houses of some of my German friends from when I was a kid that kind of seemed to generally be true.

A couple posts back you said that you were well prepared as far as food storage goes, but I don't know if you would be a very good representation of the general Dutchman as you ARE posting on a preparedness forum and I'd have to guess that if you weren't into it before that some of it has rubbed off on you during your time here (just a guess).

Q : What are your neighbors and friends like that don't have food storage??? (Meaning how many days would they last?)

BTW - They do have motorized scooters so that the elderly and the obese can get around in those places. :wink:

Image

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Yes, our news is a lot more graphic at times. It's not uncommon to see blown off limbs at the six or eight o clock news. Usually when the news here gives out a shock warning (rare), then it's best if you believe them.

And the brute forcing I mentioned; it's rare for police here to use their firearms, even moreso during riots. Where it may be acceptable to, for instance, use rubber bullets in the US, it's totally unheard of in Europe. (Well, not everywhere, of course, but it's very rare all the same.) Where it's unheard of in the US (against the law, even) to use military and National Garde usage is rare (and, from what I've gathered, usually doesn't happen until a few people have died) against the populace, European governments will have no problems with that. In our past it has happened multiple times that the army went in to quench riots. When this happends, the riots usually end within hours, because when armed forces get sent, they get permission to shoot. Still, it's not as if it's an enjoyable past time amongst our policians to send out the troops against citizens, so usually our riot police will get a lot more down and dirty than, from what I've gathered, US riot police would go. European riot police will more quickly use their batons, tear gas, water cannon, dogs and horses than their American counterparts and it's not unheard of for riot police to fight for hours with rioters. This may sound ridicule, but this strong determination is partially there because the alternative (sending in the troops) is a whole lot less appealing. Also, European countries tend to have a bit more of a 'meh' approach regarding police brutality during riots. While officially not the standpoint, unofficially there kind of is the agreement that if you're dumb enough to participate in a riot, you should shut the fuck up when you're on the pavement with a baton in your kidney and a dog near your privates.
Sounds like a pretty accurate representation to me on the contrast in the use of force policies between the US and Europe for the police, national guard and the military.

I never saw any riots in person while I was there in Europe for several years, but I've seen a bunch of riots in Europe (especially France) on the news and read accounts of them and I've seen a few riots in the US in person and read accounts of them and that seems to be a fairly accurate description.

As far as the differences between how the media is here and how it is there personally I'd prefer to see the truth. That's not to say that I constantly want to see gore, I just don't like being lied to and I'd prefer to see the truth about what's going on. That's generally why I prefer to watch the BBC when trying to figure out what's going on in the world. It's available here on cable, they speak English and they don't gloss over things that I might find important.
Lastly; I do not know a whole lot about France (I reckon it's a country best avoided; wind always seems to be blowing from that general direction) but know enough about the sensitivity of their past; like most European countries they've had a rich colonial history which has resulted in a lot of immigrants in their country. The list of immigrants increased in the '60's and '70's with people from non-colonial countries. But because of the colonial history, it's very hard for them - due to political correctness as a result of said sensitivity - to be tough against (former) immigrants (or their decendants). Simply because they're afraid of being seen as racist or the aggressive colonist. Hence why the banliue riots of France (mainly Paris) from a few years back was handled with relatively little violence (though their riot police still got in a lot of tough fights, mind you): it's too difficult to send in authority figures with orders to shoot (be it real or rubber bullets) without looking like a bigotish colonial arse. Had those riots been commited by middle class white-skinned bastards, the TV footage would've looked very different. Thankfully for the French government these recent strikes (with accompanying riots) were commited by those of all colors, so it was hard for people to make them look like racist assholes. Result: quick, effective and, at times, hard police actions.

Having typed all this I hope it didn't come off as political; I'm just trying to explain (my view) of these recent French riots and subsequent police response.
Doesn't sound political to me, just sounds like the general thought processes that go behind trying to put down riots by the powers that be. If you're an ordinary citizen wondering why the government is doing something this way one time and then does something a completely different way the next time then that info is good to know.

At any rate it's not like you're advocating one political position or another, you're just explaining the use of force process in Europe for the Police or Military whenever there's a riot. To me it's kind of interesting and I don't find it all that political.

BTW - Troops can be used here in the US, but there's a whole chain of events that have to happen first because of the Posse Comitatus Act so it doesn't happen all that often.

Exceptions to the Posse Comitatus Act (*Click*)

Usually here in the US if there's a large riot or massive civil unrest it's just the Police against the rioters or if it gets REALLY bad then they'll call in the National Guard (which are technically a State Force, but which can be Federalized).
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by MingTheMerciless » Mon Oct 25, 2010 12:46 am

I totally understand the chain of connection, but it is funny to see the French Riot discussion end in pictures of people getting around a Wall Mart Super Center on electric scooters.

Whenever I pause to really look at the size of one of those buildings I am torn between two feelings:

1) The desire to run screaming and not stop until I am in 100 miles from the nearest one of those monstrosities.
2) Wanting to stand there with my hand over my heart and sing "I'm Proud to be an American".

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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Browning 35 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:03 am

MingTheMerciless wrote:I totally understand the chain of connection, but it is funny to see the French Riot discussion end in pictures of people getting around a Wall Mart Super Center on electric scooters.
Yeah, I know what you mean. We are kinda of a bunch of random weirdos sometimes. :wink:

I'd like to see the discussion come full circle and find out how much food the average European person has on hand (Not the stock of food from someone that's into preparedness).

Then maybe one of us could counter with a few pictures of what some of the American average citizen has on stock. (also from a non-prepper)

Most of us already know the weapon laws of the various European countries Vs. the US and we already know that for the most part Americans are a little luckier in this regard (depending on the individual country in Europe) than most Europeans. What I'm kinda curious about now are the differences in food storage.

Do Americans stock more food than Europeans on average?

Or because our stores are generally larger than those in Europe do most Americans count on the fact that the food will be there in a crisis (like during a riot)?
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Evan the Diplomat wrote:Why do you want to shoot penguins? What did they ever do to you?
It's that smug, superior attitude of theirs, strutting around in their fancy outfits like they're better than everyone else. Yeah, burn in hell, you snobbish bird bastards.

And don't get me started on pandas!

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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Lynxian » Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:31 am

Browning 35 wrote:I'd like to see the discussion come full circle and find out how much food the average European person has on hand (Not the stock of food from someone that's into preparedness).

Then maybe one of us could counter with a few pictures of what some of the American average citizen has on stock. (also from a non-prepper)

Most of us already know the weapon laws of the various European countries Vs. the US and we already know that for the most part Americans are a little luckier in this regard (depending on the individual country in Europe) than most Europeans. What I'm kinda curious about now are the differences in food storage.

Do Americans stock more food than Europeans on average?

Or because our stores are generally larger than those in Europe do most Americans count on the fact that the food will be there in a crisis (like during a riot)?
While I can't supply pictures (for some reason, my neighbours wouldn't like that ;)) and can only speak for The Netherlands, here's the average Dutchie's approach to food;

Generally speaking - exceptions are with the younger and / or the single - people will buy the bulk of their foods at the beginning of the week. This means that at the beginning of the week, there will be, roughly, a week's supply of food. Most people will have a tad bit more on hand. About 9 or 10 days' worth. On Friday this generally means most houses have about 3 to 4 days of food left. The further in the week you go, the less fresh it'll get or it will just be bulk food. (E.g.: canned goods. Not the ZS type of buying what's logical, but more like lost cans of peasoup, stuff like that.) The exceptions are the people that buy their food every day or once every two days at takeaway and / or supermarket.

This behaviour will differ a bit depending on two variables; age and location.

Age
The older they get (for ease of discussion; everyone over the age of 50), the more likely they are to have at least a week's supply of canned goods. Reasons for this are twofold; during the Cold War it was actively encouraged to keep a few weeks worth of food supplies in a pantry. People who actively lived through this period have the knack of having picked up on this and have made it a habit. The second reason is those who lived through either the second world war (especially the hunger winter of 1944) and the postwar years in which food was still on foodstamps.

Location
While we're a small country with lots of conviniences relatively close-by, this is also a bit of a stereotype. This is true for all European countries; people (e.g.: non-Europeans) tend to think Europe's one big urbanized area with cities (and appropriate services) everywhere. This isn't true; most European countries do have things relatively close by, but relative here is the important word; plenty of villages still exist (in fact: hundreds in The Netherlands alone) that are not in the urbanized areas. If you live in a remote village, stocking up on supplies is a necessity: you can't go to the city every so often since it's too far. Hence you stock up. Going to the supermarket just because you forgot bolognese sauce for your spaghetti is quite annoying when it's a 20 minute drive by car.

Hopefully, this gives a good idea of the supplies people in The Netherlands keep.

And no; I'm not your average Dutchman in that regard. ;) I'm on a preparedness forum and I'll be damned if I run out of food if some strikers prevent the transportation of foods. I'll just flick on the TV and wait for riot police to start charging...
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by gridley » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:06 am

On the derivative topic, while my own preps don't qualify, I thought I'd weigh in with what my family did for food when I was growing up. I don't say this is typical, but if enough of us weigh in...

Anyway, for most things my mother would keep a list and go to the grocery store once a week. This provided 100% of fresh fruits, veggies, dairy, etc. as well as things like pasta and canned stuff. Once a year we'd get a visit from an American Frozen Foods sales rep (turns out they're still in business: http://www.americanfoods.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ), and buy enough frozen meat and other stuff to completely fill the chest freezer in the basement. Aside from that, we'd have several days to a couple weeks worth of dry and bottled/canned stuff; flour, juice, etc. on hand right before a shopping trip. Looking back, I'm pretty sure we could have eaten for about two weeks before everything went bad or ran out even if we got hit right before the weekly shopping trip. Water would have been a problem.

On the plus side, I give my parents credit: they planned ahead. On the downside, no water storage worth mentioning.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Lynxian » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:14 am

gridley wrote:On the plus side, I give my parents credit: they planned ahead. On the downside, no water storage worth mentioning.
Ah yes, on that note: almost no Dutchie stores water. They don't think the tap water could ever go out. (Probably because it really is very good quality.) They might have some fuzzy drinks stored (imagine running out of cola, eesh) but that's about it.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Valarius » Mon Oct 25, 2010 1:34 pm

The strikes are slowly fading, but the damage is accumulating.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6 ... geNumber=1" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by Maeklos » Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:52 am

On the side subject of preps, I thought I'd chime in on my own observations about Americans and food storage.

Pretty much everyone I've ever known has had a pantry full of canned and dried foods (pasta, beans, rice, etc). This doesn't come from any pre-planning, but more of the fact that people tend to overbuy food at the grocery store and then just never use it. Cans of green beans on sale, $2 for 3? Well, let's pick up 3 then. Top Ramen's $2.69 for a case of 12? Let's pick up two cases!

Right now, for instance, the pantry in my house is stuffed full of canned food...most of which has been there for months. Roommates and I tend to go through the store and buy stuff every couple of days to make, or will base a week's worth of food around what we get at the (now ending) farmer's market. Pick up 20 pounds of tomatoes and make enough red sauce to last a week, etc. But going to the store to pick up random things (say we're out of chips, soda, and other non-meal stuff) and we tend to run afoul of sales. Mountain Dew is 4 12-packs for $12? Let's get 4! Chef Boyardee is 10 for $10? Hey, that's a great filler meal when no one feels like cooking or for a quick lunch. Might as well grab 10 or even 20 cans.

And gods help me if Dinty Moore is on sale, especially with winter coming on...

So, that's my observations. People tend to have a lot more food on hand than they realize due to the fact that most American supermarkets throw ludicrously good sales at us, and then never use it all up.
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by cdsmit4 » Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:24 pm

On the subject of supermarkets, my wife and I worked in Iran (for the Shah's military) for three years. We only survived the lack of peanut butter because of some happy, helpful co-workers who had access to the military mission there. For the other items, we went on the local market, and bargained for some things. The point of all this is that, come the end of our tour, we came home and the first time we walk into a real supermarket, we went into a kind of catatonic shock looking at the range of choices. I could not believe the number of toothpastes. Several kinds of a like brand even!

We went to the store weekly for the bulk of our food, but some of it was purchased daily. What a pain.

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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by S Squirrel » Tue Nov 02, 2010 12:15 pm

I haven't seen any news about the riots recently. Have things died down over there? Is the media doing a blackout or just focusing on our elections?
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Re: Riots, Strikes and Demonstrations in France Expand

Post by the_alias » Tue Nov 02, 2010 12:26 pm

S Squirrel wrote:I haven't seen any news about the riots recently. Have things died down over there? Is the media doing a blackout or just focusing on our elections?
There are other news sites out there bar American ones. Google's news search is also pretty good.

Things have died down, people have gone back to work, refinery strikes have pretty much ended. I think there are some more demos set for November but can't quite recall.

Since the French now don't get paid when going on strike (they used to) the impact will always be less as people loose money.

The pension reforms passed in the French parliament
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