It is currently Mon Jun 18, 2018 4:11 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1864 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 2:35 am 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
From CNBC: The other North Korea nuclear threat we should be worried about
Quote:
The other North Korea nuclear threat we should be worried about

North Korea's questionable nuclear safety standards and its isolation from the global scientific community increase the risk of a nuclear accident, according to 38North

The country's leader Kim Jong Un was caught on tape smoking a cigarette next to an intercontinental ballistic missile earlier this year

If a nuclear disaster does occur, it would likely cause regional panic

By Nyshka Chandran | @nyshkac CNBC.com

The risk of a North Korean nuclear meltdown can't be ignored, according to a recent note published on 38North, a project of the US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Longstanding doubts over the hermit kingdom's nuclear safety resurfaced in July, when a video emerged of leader Kim Jong Un smoking a cigarette next to a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile.

"Kim's recklessness is certainly notable, and it hints at an under-emphasized and potentially devastating possibility: the threat of a nuclear accident in North Korea," said the 38North note, released late last week.

Adding to the concern, Chinese researchers said in September that North Korea's Punggye-ri nuclear test site was at risk of imploding. That was followed by TV Asahi's October report of a tunnel collapse at the same nuclear site, an incident believed to have killed more than 200 people. Pyongyang, in response, called the report false and dismissed it as misinformation.

The Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center, the North's major nuclear facility, is so densely concentrated that one fire could lead to a disaster potentially worse than Chernobyl, former South Korean President Park Geun-hye claimed in 2014.

Known as the worst nuclear disaster in history, a 1986 explosion at a nuclear reactor inside Ukraine's Chernobyl nuclear plant spewed tons of radioactive material into the air and resulted in thousands of deaths linked to radiation exposure and cancer.

"While [Park's'] damage assessment is likely an exaggeration — researchers from 38 North assess Chernobyl's power output to have been 3,000 percent greater than Yongbyon — the potential for a nuclear accident is not," the note said.

The North has yet to witness a serious accident, but it's had a couple of close calls.

A previous 38North note revealed one episode in July 2013, when a 5 MWe plutonium production reactor was briefly shut down after a flood destroyed parts of the cooling systems. "If a flood cuts off the cooling water supply to the reactors before they can be shut down, a major safety problem could occur — this is exactly what prompted the series of nuclear meltdowns at Fukushima."

And should an accident occur, the rogue state's secretive nature could exacerbate the situation.

"Reliable information would be scarce, as the regime would certainly attempt to suppress any reporting on the extent of the damage. Regional panic would set in, and governments in South Korea, China and Japan would feel immense pressure to respond," the note said, adding that political panic would likely surpass the actual radiological exposure and environmental impact.

In Chernobyl's aftermath, many attributed the disaster to the fact that Soviet nuclear reactor operators never had an opportunity to learn from international peers — a similiar situation to North Korea.

The international community should propose nuclear safety talks with Kim's administration, a move that could result in productive discussions on the nation's nuclear program as well lead to greater regional dialogue, the note said.

Seeing as Pyongyang has declared itself a responsible nuclear state, emphasizing its pledges of no-first-use and non-proliferation, "a commitment to nuclear safety would go a long way towards publicly demonstrating its adherence to these principles," 38North said.

Nyshka Chandran Reporter, CNBC Asia-Pacific

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 7:49 am 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2015 3:56 pm
Posts: 1169
Location: Possum Kingdom, WV
Winter Games: PyeongChang Feb 9 - Feb 25, 2018.

A world news event, and so close to Lil Kim.

_________________
It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see.
Henry David Thoreau


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 2:33 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3956
from NewsWeak

China and Russia Train for War With U.S. if Trump Invades North Korea

https://www.yahoo.com/news/china-russia ... 28765.html

Image

As posted in one astute comment:

"China and Russia Train for War With U.S. if Trump Invades North Korea”

Translation:

China and Russia’s military are doing what they’ve been doing for decades. Our headline is designed to make you click on the story.

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:38 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 2653
Location: Coastal SC
I'm amazed at how fast they acquired nukes and miniaturized them. It's like someone is giving them the knowledge.

_________________
jnathan wrote:
Since we lost some posts due to some database work I'll just put this here for posterity.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 1:46 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
NamelessStain wrote:
I'm amazed at how fast they acquired nukes and miniaturized them. It's like someone is giving them the knowledge.
I've wondered about that also.

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 1:50 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Nuclear Strike Drills Faded Away In The 1980s. It May Be Time To Dust Them Off
Quote:
Nuclear Strike Drills Faded Away In The 1980s. It May Be Time To Dust Them Off December 19, 20175:39 PM ET By Martin Kaste

The jitters over North Korea's missile tests have led Hawaii to bring back air raid sirens. The state already has sirens in place in case of tsunami, but starting this month the state will once again test the "wailing tone" meant specifically to warn of attack.

But Hawaii remains an exception. In most of the country, air raid sirens are long gone. In Seattle, the mainland big city closest to North Korea, emergency management officials say they would use the Emergency Broadcast System to send out alerts by TV and radio, as well as alerts to smart phones.

The question, though, is how prepared the public would be to respond to such an alert?

"We're beyond the generation now of remembering what Hiroshima and Nagasaki looked like," says Seattle emergency management director Barb Graff. "We need to keep in mind that it's more than just warning people and saying 'run!'"

During the Cold War, the federal Civil Defense Administration produced films with specific advice on how to survive nuclear attack. Although they're often mocked today, the films did contain useful information that could save lives.

"The concept of 'duck and cover' really came from the idea that you had the ability to protect yourself from those prompt effects," says Brooke Buddemeier, a certified health physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, who's studied potential risks of nuclear attack. He says the Civil Defense recommendations weren't as futile as people think, especially in the early days of the Cold War, when nuclear weapons were less powerful and the Soviets had a smaller arsenal. And the advice may still save lives now, in the event of nuclear terrorism or a limited attack by North Korea.

"For a smaller, sort of low-yield nuclear detonation, in a modern urban city, even near the detonation there's a very good chance of survival if you can get inside, stay inside and stay tuned," Buddemeier says.

That kind of survival advice is still available today, but people have to seek it out on websites such as Homeland Security's Ready.gov. Government officials, federal and local, have become leery of high-visibility public awareness campaigns about surviving nuclear attack. In Washington state, there's even a law passed in 1984 that forbids preparations for nuclear attack. Local emergency officials say the law doesn't hamper them in practice, but the lingering symbolism is clear, says nuclear weapons historian Alex Wellerstein, at the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey.

"Civil defense got very politically controversial in the 1980s," Wellerstein says. "And a lot of people, especially on the left, essentially argued that civil defense was a waste of money at best, because it wasn't going to be effective, and at worst it was an insidious plan to make people complacent."

Wellerstein is now part of a Carnegie Corporation-funded project called Reinventing Civil Defense, which seeks to rethink an effective version of nuclear preparedness for the 21st century. He says the Cold War efforts included some worthwhile elements, but officials made a big mistake in not being honest about how bad an attack could be.

"They really didn't want to have to say, 'There really isn't a lot of work we can do for you people, because if the Soviet Union launches 30 nuclear weapons at New York City, you guys aren't going to make it.' And not being able to 'fess up to that fact I think discredited a lot of their work."

So today, most local plans for nuclear attack are low-profile, if they exist at all. Ventura County, Calif., which in 2014 created a specific plan for nuclear attack, is one of the exceptions to the rule.

Instead, emergency managers take what's called the "All Hazards" approach — they say they can apply to a nuclear attack the same skills they'd use for other crises, such as earthquakes.

But Washington state senator Mark Miloscia — who is a former Air Force bomber pilot — would like to see more specific planning for nuclear attack. For him, the first step would be to change the 1984 state law barring nuclear emergency preparations, which he finds too fatalistic.

"Nuclear war is survivable. It may be horrific, and it may be painful, and it may be destruction all around, but it is survivable if you're smart about it," he says. "To say 'give up hope and just die,' I don't think that's the best of any sort of American spirit."

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 4:33 pm 
Offline
* * *
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 3:07 pm
Posts: 555
Location: North Carolina
A successful tie-in between the Robot Uprising - Or, what to do when AI Does All The Jobs thread and this thread: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/12/20/south-korean-dronebot-combat-team-could-target-kim-jong-un.html!
Yay?

Donebots designed to take out mostly equipment, not people, but they come up with a lot of the same countermeasure issues we'd speculated out earlier in the other thread. A large enough swarm could overwhelm defenses, particularly if we haven't developed defenses for this specific kind of threat before.

_________________
Rahul Telang wrote:
If you don’t have a plan in place, you will find different ways to screw it up

Colin Wilson wrote:
There’s no point in kicking a dead horse. If the horse is up and ready and you give it a slap on the bum, it will take off. But if it’s dead, even if you slap it, it’s not going anywhere.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 4:45 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
From ABC (Australia): Inside the US military base ready to invade North Korea
Quote:
Inside the US military base ready to invade North Korea 7.30 By North Asia correspondent Matthew Carney

When it comes to North Korea, the Trump administration says every day is a step closer to war.

To some it may be a war of words, but the US soldiers on the ground in Camp Humphreys, in South Korea, live that potential conflict every minute, every day.

Just 120 kilometres south of the border with North Korea, they are actively preparing and planning for war, a ground invasion and occupation that could take years.

7.30 was granted extensive access to the base — a logistics centre, a staging post and a key part of US war plans as it faces off against a nuclear-armed enemy.

Preparing to 'fight tonight'

On a foggy, icy morning at 6am, thousands of soldiers across Camp Humphreys are doing their daily drills in preparation for war.

The whole camp is on a war footing as tensions ramp up on the Korean Peninsula.

On another part of the base in a spacious apartment, First Sergeant Mary Myers is getting her kids up and ready for school. She's a veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan but North Korea could be her biggest mission yet.

She says the soldiers are ready.

This is what we have been training to do all this time. We are focused on our mission and prepared for war," she told 7.30.

If conflict breaks out her kids will be evacuated within hours and she'll be deployed immediately.

Everything we do is focused around the 'fight tonight' concept, and it is truly that," she said.

"So, drop kids off and fight!"

Sergeant Myers drops her kids off at one of the six schools within the base before heading to work. She says having her family with her makes her a better soldier.

"If you're taking care of a soldier's family, then they are going to take care of you. And the command understands this. That's because if you don't care about their family, why are they going to go the extra mile to help the mission out?"

'The most lethal aircraft'

If war breaks out, Camp Humphreys will be the command centre for intelligence and communication and, of course, much of the strike power at the base is kept secret.

But the US military did allow 7.30 to look at Apache attack helicopters.

Chief Warrant Officer Rocky Myers is in charge of 23 Apaches.

"They are by far the most advanced aircraft in the world," he said.

The most lethal aircraft capable of hitting targets on any battlefield, regardless of conditions."

These Apaches would be in the first wave of attacks into North Korea. They're fully computerised and specialise in search and destroy missions. Chief Warrant Officer Myers said North Korea could not match their weaponry.

We have to maintain a level of readiness to provide commanders at all levels to 'fight tonight', to remain second to none on the Peninsula," he said.

Camp Humphreys is a constant hive of activity. War games and training go on 24 hours a day.

Army spokesperson, Lieutenant Colonel Peggy Kageleiry, claims "the US is the finest fighting force in history".

"We train for conflict all the time. Our job is to be ready and we do that right here. I'm very confident on our ability to react in case of conflict."

Humphreys to be biggest overseas US base

More than other US bases, Camp Humphreys operates much like an American city, with blocks of apartments, shopping malls, churches and gyms.

And there are all the familiar American fast food restaurants like Burger King or Taco Bell.

It's relatively safe, just beyond the frontline and out of range of conventional North Korean artillery. It's where the US will consolidate most of its forces in Korea. When it is finished in 2020, Camp Humphreys will house 46,000 military personal, making it the biggest overseas US base in the world.

The South Korean government will pay 90 per cent of the $14 billion expansion, making a mockery of Donald Trump's claims in his election campaign that South Korea doesn't pay for US military defence.

Under treaty obligations, Australian troops would most likely come to Camp Humphreys to assist in any war effort. The US military says taking out North Korea's weapons of mass destruction would require a ground invasion involving at least 100,000 troops.

The US has been in South Korea for 70 years protecting its ally, but the mission is expanding.

Deputy Garrison Commander Patrick MacKenzie is effectively the deputy mayor in charge of services and infrastructure. He said an important part of Camp Humphreys' success has been to ensure locals benefit from the development and growth.

"They got new bridges, roads and rail into the area. Samsung and LG are moving their largest plants into the area. Pyeongtaek, the Korean city around the base, will grow from 470,000 to a million in a short time," he said.

But it didn't start that way.

Local community divided over base

When land was acquired a decade ago to build the base, about 15,000 locals came out to protest and there was violent armed confrontations. Landowners were eventually given significant amounts of compensation.

And like US bases anywhere, Camp Humphreys has brought an increase in crime, assaults and prostitution. That's improved but the base still divides the local community, claimed Kang Song Won who heads the local Pyeongtaek Peace Centre.

"I think the US should leave. Our peace cannot be protected by guns. It makes us a target. South Korea and United States should rethink their strategy," he said.

Opposition is sharpest at the villages near the base. Locals have to put up with 200 to 300 flights screaming overhead 24 hours a day.

"People are suffering depression and insomnia," Kang Song Won said.

"We can't get compensation from the US military. The South Korean government gives token compensation but there are still cases of assaults and sexual harassment to residents."

'They can't be too drunk'

It's Sergeant Myers job to try and minimise the bad behaviour. She is in charge of troop welfare and was dealing with the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday at the time of 7.30's visit. In a meeting she told her officers to "remind soldiers of the repercussions of underage or drinking to excess".

We have to be ready to fight tonight so they can't be too drunk. They must have phones on them," she said.

Sergeant Myers said cutting alcohol consumption was critical to curbing assaults. US troops have strict curfews and are banned from visiting some local bars.

She knows just one assault on or off the base can undermine the whole mission.

"It completely rips apart our morale. Being in the army, people you work with, you feel like family, so to have someone you trusted as a brother as sister assault you in any way is extremely damaging to any organisation."

Whether there's war or peace on the Korean Peninsula, the US is cementing a long-term presence to project into the region. Camp Humphreys is the centrepiece of this strategy, strengthening the troops' resolve and building up the military hardware, whatever the outcome.

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:10 am 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
The DPRK is a shithole country!!!

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 1:54 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
From CNN: Missile threat alert for Hawaii a false alarm.

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 4:08 am 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
From ABC (Australia): The case for using military force to denuclearise North Korea
Quote:
By Danny Lam, University of Waterloo

As American and Canadian officials meet this week to discuss North Korea, it's worth a reminder that military options must be on the table if diplomatic efforts to denuclearise the country fail.

The Korean conflict of the 1950s never formally ended. It concluded with an armistice that saw six decades of relative calm with sporadic outbreaks of violence.

Meanwhile, South Korea became democratic and the world's 10th largest economy. North Korea, on the other hand — an impoverished Communist dynasty — is on the third generation of Kims.

Kim Jong-un, North Korea's leader since 2012, has transformed what was a modest nuclear weapons program under his father.

Weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) became a national priority, and now North Korea is just months away from achieving a credible nuclear armed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of targeting North America.

Many "experts" dismiss or underestimate this threat. US intelligence did too until recently.

Soon, North Korea will be able to threaten or fight a war with nuclear weapons. Will we be able to live with them just as we do with Russia, China and other nuclear armed states?

Since the end of World War II, nuclear weapons have been used only as defensive weapons and not against any state.

They serve as a deterrent to others, not an offensive weapon by any rational state — barring accidents or miscalculations.

Crossing the red line

The 21st century's Korean War will likely involve crossing that nuclear threshold. This has long been viewed as a "red line" no state has crossed since 1945.

The nuclear threshold was formulated because nuclear weapons are so destructive.

War between nuclear armed states will almost certainly result in "mutually assured destruction."

Post-World War II, nuclear weapons states have uniformly refrained from using the weapons on others. Superiority in conventional weapons was sufficient without crossing the nuclear threshold, and war between nuclear armed states was unthinkable.

Quote:
North Korea, therefore, presents a major challenge today. It is a nuclear-armed state that is very close to, if not already capable of, wreaking mass destruction anywhere in the world — and openly threatening to do so.


The fear that North Korea could strike any time contributed to the widespread panic felt in Hawaii over the weekend when a false alert about an incoming ballistic missile attack was dispatched to mobile phones throughout the islands, already on edge because of the tensions.

It is unclear whether ballistic missile defence systems will work against North Korean ICBMs. Many countries like Canada and most of the European Union, in fact, have no defence against North Korean ICBMs.

The question of North Korea's intentions and motives has divided expert opinion.

Rational? Or a madman?

Many experts believe that Kim Jong-un is actually rational and is using his nuclear arsenal as a deterrent, knowing that launching a nuclear attack would amount to suicide since the US would retaliate in kind.

North Korea, therefore, is just like any other nuclear armed state, these experts contend.

The US Government, on the other hand, has different ideas.

The Americans argue North Korea's goals are not defensive or centred on regime survival, but offensive, with the intention of expelling the US from South Korea, unifying the Koreas on their terms and then extorting compensation from those with whom North Korea has grievances.

I am a defence analyst who testified to a Canadian parliamentary committee in 2017 on why and how Canada could defend itself against such an attack from Kim Jong-un.

I believe that despite the risks, the US and its allies must consider a resumption of the Korean War in order to denuclearise the Korean peninsula.

There is a brief window of perhaps one year in which allies have "good" military options — meaning options that would not result in global mass destruction — to permanently eliminate North Korea's nuclear arsenal.

After that, North Korea's nukes will be too large and sophisticated.

These military options must comply with international conventions on the legitimate use of force — specifically, that it's the last resort after all other peaceful means have failed.

Force used should also be proportionate, and ideally the minimum necessary.

Minimising damage

The US is constrained by rules of law, convention and consideration to both protect allies and minimise collateral damage to both allies and belligerents.

While precision munitions can limit damage, the sheer quantity of North Korean targets means that assured destruction will be difficult.

Low-yield nuclear explosives may be the only technically sound means for certain targets whose destruction must be achieved with certainty.

Quote:
Crossing the nuclear threshold is a big decision, made more difficult because the international law definition of WMDs, by default, defines all nuclear explosives as WMDs, regardless of their actual effect.


North Korea has expressed no compunction about crossing the nuclear threshold. It has made clear its intent to do so either by surprise attack or a pre-emptive strike.

The country's intention to challenge and change the status quo with offensive use of nuclear weapons is well-documented.

China, Russia and the US, on the other hand, have historically had grave reservations about crossing the nuclear threshold for fear that it would lead to general nuclear war. They still do.

It's not clear that either Russia or China would use their nuclear arsenal to defend North Korea in the event of a conflict. It's also not inevitable that American use of nuclear explosives would result in mutual destruction.

On the contrary, it may prevent North Korea from using its own nuclear weapons.

As it stands, there is no question that the United States would use nuclear weapons to retaliate against a successful North Korean nuclear strike on American soil.

Selective, judicious, limited use of nuclear explosives on the most difficult North Korean targets, indeed, may offer the only military option that can prevent mass casualties in North Korea, South Korea, Japan and the United States.

Properly used, nuclear munitions can result in a minimum of radioactive or long-term contamination, or mass destruction — far lesser consequences than if North Korea actually detonated one of their crude nuclear weapons.

The implications of resorting to military options on North Korea that might include nuclear explosives should weigh heavily on Kim Jong-un.

China, Russia and others have assumed that the US is just bluffing.

But realistic assessments of North Korea's vulnerability to American power and determination to denuclearise the Korean Peninsula could bring them to the negotiating table before it's too late.

Danny Lam is research associate at the Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy, University of Waterloo.

Originally published in The Conversation

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:41 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:58 pm
Posts: 3956
Thanks to Chicago Zombie -

This book is free right at this moment as a Kindle download that you can read on other devices

Chicago Zombie wrote:
Korean War: A Captivating Guide to Korean War History

(93 pages)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075W7X9QR/


Image

_________________
Most of my adventures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
My Introduction With Pictures: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 10&t=79019" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Graduated with honors from kit porn university


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:50 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
NPR has reported that the DPRK has announced that they are considering an atmospheric nuclear test over the Pacific.

They are savages. :twisted:

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:29 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Posts: 3501
Location: Central Cascadia
MPMalloy wrote:
NPR has reported that the DPRK has announced that they are considering an atmospheric nuclear test over the Pacific.

They are savages. :twisted:


HOLY FUCK!?!?!???! Just yesterday I read that KJU was praising SK for their hospitality and being exceptionally inviting to the NK athletes and dignitaries..... I'm sure that includes DOZENS of handlers so no one runs off. Wonder how many handlers there are for every athlete/dignitary.

_________________
JeeperCreeper wrote:
I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:
Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:35 pm 
Offline
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 4:21 pm
Posts: 7893
Location: Middle of nowhere, West Texas
Halfapint wrote:
MPMalloy wrote:
NPR has reported that the DPRK has announced that they are considering an atmospheric nuclear test over the Pacific.

They are savages. :twisted:


HOLY FUCK!?!?!???! Just yesterday I read that KJU was praising SK for their hospitality and being exceptionally inviting to the NK athletes and dignitaries..... I'm sure that includes DOZENS of handlers so no one runs off. Wonder how many handlers there are for every athlete/dignitary.


My guess is at least two handlers per athlete and maybe three per dignitary. With the recent defection of that soldier (or was it a high ranking official ?), I'm sure NK has plenty of folks watching over the athletes and dignitaries to make sure nothing like that happens again.


And given how successful NK's previous nuclear tests were (in other words, not very successful), it wouldn't surprise me if we hear that NK accidentally nuked themselves while conducting this test.

_________________
Writer of "October Rising"
"Looking Forward, Looking Back"
"Looking Homeward"

12_Gauge_Chimp's blog


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:36 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Halfapint wrote:
MPMalloy wrote:
NPR has reported that the DPRK has announced that they are considering an atmospheric nuclear test over the Pacific.

They are savages. :twisted:


HOLY FUCK!?!?!???! Just yesterday I read that KJU was praising SK for their hospitality and being exceptionally inviting to the NK athletes and dignitaries..... I'm sure that includes DOZENS of handlers so no one runs off. Wonder how many handlers there are for every athlete/dignitary.
Anyone runs off & they are condeming their entire extended family to a prison camp. Not to be taken that some still wouldn't try.

If Kim's sister ran off, would the Kim family go to a prison camp? :D

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:59 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:16 pm
Posts: 11800
MPMalloy wrote:
Halfapint wrote:
MPMalloy wrote:
NPR has reported that the DPRK has announced that they are considering an atmospheric nuclear test over the Pacific.

They are savages. :twisted:


HOLY FUCK!?!?!???! Just yesterday I read that KJU was praising SK for their hospitality and being exceptionally inviting to the NK athletes and dignitaries..... I'm sure that includes DOZENS of handlers so no one runs off. Wonder how many handlers there are for every athlete/dignitary.
Anyone runs off & they are condeming their entire extended family to a prison camp. Not to be taken that some still wouldn't try.

If Kim's sister ran off, would the Kim family go to a prison camp? :D


His brother ran off so I will say definitely not. Of course they spent years tracking him down and murdering him so that would not be good for her either.

http://www.businessinsider.com/kim-jong ... nam-2017-2

_________________
"Big Thanks - I promise to advance your agenda within the secret and omnipotent councils of the Trilateral Commission"

“No-one likes us, we don’t care.”


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:02 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Posts: 3501
Location: Central Cascadia
Stercutus wrote:
MPMalloy wrote:
Halfapint wrote:
MPMalloy wrote:
NPR has reported that the DPRK has announced that they are considering an atmospheric nuclear test over the Pacific.

They are savages. :twisted:


HOLY FUCK!?!?!???! Just yesterday I read that KJU was praising SK for their hospitality and being exceptionally inviting to the NK athletes and dignitaries..... I'm sure that includes DOZENS of handlers so no one runs off. Wonder how many handlers there are for every athlete/dignitary.
Anyone runs off & they are condeming their entire extended family to a prison camp. Not to be taken that some still wouldn't try.

If Kim's sister ran off, would the Kim family go to a prison camp? :D


His brother ran off so I will say definitely not. Of course they spent years tracking him down and murdering him so that would not be good for her either.

http://www.businessinsider.com/kim-jong ... nam-2017-2


They knew were he was for years. I wonder how long it took to actually get him killed off. If I recall he only died a few months ago.

Fake edit: I didn't see article in the original claim but see it in the quote. weird.

_________________
JeeperCreeper wrote:
I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:
Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2018 6:15 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
From CNBC: North Korea says it has suspended nuclear and long-range missile tests
Quote:
North Korea says it has suspended nuclear and long-range missile tests and plans to close its nuclear test site.

The North's official Korean Central News Agency said the suspension of nuclear and ICBM tests went into effect Saturday.

The country says it's making the move to shift its national focus and improve its economy.

President Donald Trump welcomed the news, saying it signals progress and that he looks forward to an upcoming summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

The announcements came days before Kim is set to meet South Korean President Moon Jae-in in a border truce village for a rare summit aimed at resolving the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang.

The North's decisions were made in a meeting of the ruling party's full Central Committee which had convened to discuss a "new stage" of policies.

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:37 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:16 pm
Posts: 11800
MPMalloy wrote:
From CNBC: North Korea says it has suspended nuclear and long-range missile tests
Quote:
North Korea says it has suspended nuclear and long-range missile tests and plans to close its nuclear test site.

The North's official Korean Central News Agency said the suspension of nuclear and ICBM tests went into effect Saturday.

The country says it's making the move to shift its national focus and improve its economy.

President Donald Trump welcomed the news, saying it signals progress and that he looks forward to an upcoming summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

The announcements came days before Kim is set to meet South Korean President Moon Jae-in in a border truce village for a rare summit aimed at resolving the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang.

The North's decisions were made in a meeting of the ruling party's full Central Committee which had convened to discuss a "new stage" of policies.



Image

_________________
"Big Thanks - I promise to advance your agenda within the secret and omnipotent councils of the Trilateral Commission"

“No-one likes us, we don’t care.”


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:56 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
This is how it has been so far:

1. The DPRK says "We've changed.".

2. Sanctions are lifted. Hard currency is 'earned'.

3. The DPRK resumes nuclear testing after proclaiming..."provocations".

Am I wrong?

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:06 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 3:45 pm
Posts: 2469
MPMalloy wrote:
This is how it has been so far:

1. The DPRK says "We've changed.".

2. Sanctions are lifted. Hard currency is 'earned'.

3. The DPRK resumes nuclear testing after proclaiming..."provocations".

Am I wrong?


That is my concern. I think it will take 5-10 years before I"d feel the least bit comfortable.

_________________
*Remember: I'm just a guy on the internet :)
*Don't go to stupid places with stupid people & do stupid things.
*Be courteous. Look normal. Be in bed by 10'clock.

“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” -Bilbo Baggins.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:20 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:16 pm
Posts: 11800
Much has changed for the rest of the world since the 90s. Not much has changed in NORK. This might be enough. I also think our negotiating team this around is a bit different and possibly tougher. We will see.

_________________
"Big Thanks - I promise to advance your agenda within the secret and omnipotent councils of the Trilateral Commission"

“No-one likes us, we don’t care.”


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2018 10:12 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am
Posts: 3995
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Stercutus wrote:
Much has changed for the rest of the world since the 90s. Not much has changed in NORK. This might be enough. I also think our negotiating team this around is a bit different and possibly tougher. We will see.
Things could be different these days. I want to have faith in this. I just don't trust the DPRK. :?

_________________
Matthew Paul Malloy
Veteran: USAR, USA, IAANG.

Dragon Savers!
Golden Dragons!
Tropic Lightning!
Duty! Honor! Country!

"When society is experiencing severe disruptions, or is being completely interrupted, people have the responsibility to handle their own and their nearest relatives' fundamental needs for a while."


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1864 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group