Atlantic tropics....

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by Stercutus » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:41 am

From this day to the ending of the world,
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by flybynight » Tue Sep 18, 2018 5:13 pm

They chose unwisely
As of now I bet you got me wrong

John Titor was right

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:18 pm

Stercutus wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:41 am
[YouTube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXUQ5z0ASCQ[/YouTube]
I got called up during the Great Flood of 1993. I was in a 4 pt crackerjack when the same thing nearly happened tp us. I do remember the driver saying that he had to maintain 5 MPH in order to keep water out of the exhaust.

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Sep 18, 2018 7:10 pm

From NPR: Floodwaters Rise In Carolinas, Taking Lives And Prompting Environmental Concerns
As former hurricane Florence marches on to New England, the Carolinas remain inundated with waters that just keep rising.

"I know for many people this feels like a nightmare that just won't end. I know many people are tired of the present and are scared of the future," North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said Tuesday, The Associated Press reports. "But please know we will not give up on you."
From NPR: Florence Engulfs Hog Farms And Chicken Houses, Thrashing North Carolina Agriculture
Farmers across the southeastern part of North Carolina are just starting to report details about the hit they've taken from Hurricane Florence. The rain is over, but rivers still are rising, and the full picture of damage to farms and the surrounding environment probably won't be known for weeks.

Before the hurricane, many were worried about thousands of open-air ponds where farmers store manure from their hogs, allowing the waste to decompose. According to the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality, as of noon on Sept. 18, the walls on four of these "lagoons" had failed, allowing manure to escape. Nine additional lagoons had been inundated by flooding from nearby streams, and 13 had received so much rainfall that they had overflowed their banks. Several dozen more were at or near the limit of what they can hold.

These lagoons have already been the focus of intense political controversy in North Carolina. Some residents who live near them have filed lawsuits against a large pork processor, accusing the company of creating a public nuisance and environmental hazard, and won million-dollar judgments.

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by majorhavoc » Tue Sep 18, 2018 9:02 pm

flybynight wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 5:13 pm
They chose unwisely
Indeed. Now, the penitent man will pass ...

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:41 pm

From NPR: After The Rains, Casualties Mount Amid Florence's Still-Rising Floodwaters
As floodwaters from former-Hurricane Florence's massive rains continue to flow through the Carolinas, the end of the storm's damage is nowhere in sight.

In Horry County, S.C., two women being taken for mental health care died on Tuesday night when the sheriff's office van they were being transported in met floodwaters. The deputies transporting the two women reportedly drove around barriers and then were surprised by the flood. Authorities told media outlets that the deputies couldn't get the rear doors open, and the two patients drowned inside the van. The deputies climbed on top of the van and were rescued; they have been placed on administrative leave.

At least 37 people have died in three states because of the storm; 24 of those died in vehicles, the AP reports.

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:24 pm

CNBC reports 42 fatalities due to Florence, in a related story.

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by Grant » Sat Sep 22, 2018 7:00 pm

I'll be honest, printing out some local topos from National Geographic and using them to practice with my compass really paid off, as with no power, cell service, or internet, when I heard on the radio that everyone in a mile of the Cape Fear was being evacuated, I pulled the maps out of my compass pouch and found I was two and a half miles. I'd not have had any way to know had I not had the hard copies.
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by NT2C » Sat Sep 22, 2018 7:28 pm

Grant wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 7:00 pm
I'll be honest, printing out some local topos from National Geographic and using them to practice with my compass really paid off, as with no power, cell service, or internet, when I heard on the radio that everyone in a mile of the Cape Fear was being evacuated, I pulled the maps out of my compass pouch and found I was two and a half miles. I'd not have had any way to know had I not had the hard copies.
You can download topo maps (and others) to your phone or tablet for offline use. I have a 64GB micro SD card in mine with just about every map I'd need within 600 miles of home.
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by CG » Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:07 pm

Grant wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 7:00 pm
I'll be honest, printing out some local topos from National Geographic and using them to practice with my compass really paid off, as with no power, cell service, or internet, when I heard on the radio that everyone in a mile of the Cape Fear was being evacuated, I pulled the maps out of my compass pouch and found I was two and a half miles. I'd not have had any way to know had I not had the hard copies.
I looked at National Geographic's map website and can't for the life of me figure out how to get local topos. Any suggestions?
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Sep 22, 2018 10:14 pm

This came on NPR. I don't know what to think & as such, I am not making any sort of statement:

From NPR: The Cajun Navy: Heroes Or Hindrances In Hurricanes?
During hurricanes like Florence, many people find themselves trapped and needing rescue. Sometimes volunteers step in to help — but emergency managers say some may be creating problems of their own.

This week while visiting eastern North Carolina, President Trump thanked the first responders who sometimes risk their own lives to help, mentioning traditional government officials like police officers and firefighters – and "our great Cajun Navy."

That group is one of several volunteer organizations who've stepped in during recent storms to fill what they see as a gap in the services available from government agencies.
The audio is at the website. I've never heard this about the CN before.

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by JayceSlayn » Sun Sep 23, 2018 7:31 am

CG wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:07 pm
Grant wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 7:00 pm
I'll be honest, printing out some local topos from National Geographic and using them to practice with my compass really paid off, as with no power, cell service, or internet, when I heard on the radio that everyone in a mile of the Cape Fear was being evacuated, I pulled the maps out of my compass pouch and found I was two and a half miles. I'd not have had any way to know had I not had the hard copies.
I looked at National Geographic's map website and can't for the life of me figure out how to get local topos. Any suggestions?
I've used the USGS download client before (https://viewer.nationalmap.gov/basic/), it is a little clunky to figure out how to use it, but they do have a "How To" link at the top, and it isn't too bad once you figure it out. You can pick what kinds of maps you want, or designate your own custom map, I think.
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by CG » Sun Sep 23, 2018 8:34 am

JayceSlayn wrote:
Sun Sep 23, 2018 7:31 am
CG wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:07 pm
I looked at National Geographic's map website and can't for the life of me figure out how to get local topos. Any suggestions?
I've used the USGS download client before (https://viewer.nationalmap.gov/basic/), it is a little clunky to figure out how to use it, but they do have a "How To" link at the top, and it isn't too bad once you figure it out. You can pick what kinds of maps you want, or designate your own custom map, I think.
Thanks! I'll play with that later on today. :clap:
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by flybynight » Sun Sep 23, 2018 11:01 am

Check your county website as most have a GIS map function (for just that county) that sometimes has general map, topographical and aerial views. Plus would also show property boundries
As of now I bet you got me wrong

John Titor was right

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:22 am

From NPR: Florence Floodwaters Total Thousands Of Cars, Stranding Locals
The first thing that hit Ashley Simpson when she opened her car door was the smell: a rotten, stale, mold smell, leftover from the sewage-contaminated floodwaters that engulfed her silver 2010 Chevrolet HHR Cruiser during Hurricane Florence. The next thing to hit her were the gnats flying out that had been breeding amid the mold for nearly a week.

Simpson returned to her home in New Bern, N.C., after evacuating during the storm to find that her house, flooded with 18 inches, was trashed, and her car was ruined. Her car will join an estimated thousands of others in the Carolinas that have been flooded out by Florence. Those vehicles are now scattered among the streets waiting to be towed, sitting in salvage lots to be auctioned off for parts, or potentially being resold under an illegal guise to trick buyers into purchasing duds.

These cars may look fine on the outside, like Simpson's did. But, signs of damage inside and underneath were apparent when her car wouldn't start. The car was considered a total loss by her insurance company. She had just finished paying it off over the summer.
There are laws about flood cars, but they still end up on the market. caveat emptor.

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by raptor » Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:35 am

MPMalloy wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:22 am
From NPR: Florence Floodwaters Total Thousands Of Cars, Stranding Locals
The first thing that hit Ashley Simpson when she opened her car door was the smell: a rotten, stale, mold smell, leftover from the sewage-contaminated floodwaters that engulfed her silver 2010 Chevrolet HHR Cruiser during Hurricane Florence. The next thing to hit her were the gnats flying out that had been breeding amid the mold for nearly a week.

Simpson returned to her home in New Bern, N.C., after evacuating during the storm to find that her house, flooded with 18 inches, was trashed, and her car was ruined. Her car will join an estimated thousands of others in the Carolinas that have been flooded out by Florence. Those vehicles are now scattered among the streets waiting to be towed, sitting in salvage lots to be auctioned off for parts, or potentially being resold under an illegal guise to trick buyers into purchasing duds.

These cars may look fine on the outside, like Simpson's did. But, signs of damage inside and underneath were apparent when her car wouldn't start. The car was considered a total loss by her insurance company. She had just finished paying it off over the summer.
There are laws about flood cars, but they still end up on the market. caveat emptor.

I know that smell very well. Imagine an entire city that smells that way for about a year.

If you want to know what the PAW will smell like...that is a close facsimile.

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:01 am

raptor wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:35 am
MPMalloy wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:22 am
From NPR: Florence Floodwaters Total Thousands Of Cars, Stranding Locals
The first thing that hit Ashley Simpson when she opened her car door was the smell: a rotten, stale, mold smell, leftover from the sewage-contaminated floodwaters that engulfed her silver 2010 Chevrolet HHR Cruiser during Hurricane Florence. The next thing to hit her were the gnats flying out that had been breeding amid the mold for nearly a week.

Simpson returned to her home in New Bern, N.C., after evacuating during the storm to find that her house, flooded with 18 inches, was trashed, and her car was ruined. Her car will join an estimated thousands of others in the Carolinas that have been flooded out by Florence. Those vehicles are now scattered among the streets waiting to be towed, sitting in salvage lots to be auctioned off for parts, or potentially being resold under an illegal guise to trick buyers into purchasing duds.

These cars may look fine on the outside, like Simpson's did. But, signs of damage inside and underneath were apparent when her car wouldn't start. The car was considered a total loss by her insurance company. She had just finished paying it off over the summer.
There are laws about flood cars, but they still end up on the market. caveat emptor.
I know that smell very well. Imagine an entire city that smells that way for about a year.

If you want to know what the PAW will smell like...that is a close facsimile.
Believe it. I was in the Guard during the Great Flood of 1993. Also, Team Spirit comes to mind. :(

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by Stercutus » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:52 pm

I have smelled the PAW, it doesn't smell that good. Imagine a pond of shit three feet deep and a hundred feet across. Put it out in 110 degree heat. Put a large crowd of people around it who have not bathed since the 90s. Throw a few decomposing dead bodies in to the pond, maybe some dead animals too. That is what the PAW smells like; shit and death and the great unwashed.
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Florida declares state of emergency as Tropical Storm Michael forecast to become hurricane

Post by Stercutus » Mon Oct 08, 2018 2:42 pm

A hit looks highly probable at this point. The only question is how hard?


https://www.foxnews.com/us/florida-decl ... -hurricane
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by JayceSlayn » Mon Oct 08, 2018 3:47 pm

The intensity guidance seems to show that Michael will most likely hit as a Cat 1, maybe Cat 2, small chance as a Cat 3. In any case, the track guidance seems to show this one currently as more of a "hit and run" style storm, rather than the "loiter and rain" kind, which have been so damaging lately. Strangely, the intensity guidance doesn't show it immediately dropping to a depression over land, and seems to show sustained tropical storm force winds over the continent?

With that being said: it is still obviously a storm to keep track of if you're in the path. I am expecting some increased rain again in my area, but so far it doesn't sound like a big second-hit for me.
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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:03 am

From NPR: Hurricane Michael Forecast To Hit U.S. Gulf Coast As A Major Storm Wednesday
Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

Hurricane Michael is expected to strengthen rapidly over the next 24 to 36 hours and will be "a dangerous major hurricane when it reaches the northeastern Gulf Coast on Wednesday," the National Hurricane Center says.

The storm achieved hurricane status with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph Monday morning, triggering warnings of a life-threatening storm surge that could hit the Florida Gulf Coast. Later in the day, its sustained winds topped 90 mph, with stronger gusts.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott issued a state of emergency for 26 counties on Sunday, as member station WFSU reports

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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by raptor » Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:51 am

The news is drumming its ususal shrill EOTWAWKI warnings about TS Micheal. Yes it is not to be trifled with but the hyperbole coming out of this is typical.
Hurricane Michael: 'Monstrous' storm strengthens to category two
https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/world-us-canada-45791180
Gov. Rick Scott: Hurricane Michael a 'monstrous storm'
https://www.tallahassee.com/story/news/ ... 575200002/

I say not minimize the likely impact. It is a hurricane and it will cause damage, plan accordingly if you are in the area affected.
The reason I am noting this is that this is yet another example of why you need to gather your information from multiples sources, plan ahead and make your own decisions.

A link to a great real time site that provides wind direction and speed from the surface to 45,000 ft (FL45). You can see the wind direction at FL24 that is guiding Michael.
https://www.windy.com/?500h,25.562,-89.297,4


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Re: Atlantic tropics....

Post by Stercutus » Tue Oct 09, 2018 6:44 pm

A link to a great real time site that provides wind direction and speed from the surface to 45,000 ft (FL45). You can see the wind direction at FL24 that is guiding Michael.
https://www.windy.com/?500h,25.562,-89.297,4
I think if I smoked weed I could stare at that thing for hours.
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother

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