It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 2:48 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:35 pm 
Offline
*

Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 12:16 am
Posts: 64
Location: SF Bay Area
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Fires have been raging across my area of Northern California since last Sunday, October 8th.

Image

Winds in excess of 60 mph fanned the flames from the Tubbs Fire into northeastern Santa Rosa, forcing the evacuation of 2 hospitals and several neighborhoods.
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/201 ... amage.html

Image

Drone footage of Coffey Park: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/201 ... otage.html
Image

Image Image


Being 50 miles north, Santa Rosa is the bedroom community for San Francisco. It's also in the middle of wine country, where "...winds are forecast to be similar to those that stoked the first flames Sunday night, which have since mushroomed to more than 15 fires that have scorched 220,000 acres, destroyed an estimated 5,700 structures and caused at least 38 deaths". (LA Times) A number of people that I've talked to said that they did not have a lot of time to pack before they were forced to evacuate. Most did not have anything besides the clothes they were sleeping in.

While my immediate family did not have to evacuate, I think that my wife will be changing the way that she views my prepping habits. I had a BOB for myself, her, and my daughter, ready to go when my brother called to let me know that they were evacuating. This event is a perfect, if saddening, reminder that even cities are not immune to wildfires. I've heard that roughly 5% of the housing in this area is now gone. Folks are living with friends or relatives, shelters, or have left the area. People who read this board have a different mindset about how to handle/cope with situations like this. What about the rest of your family? Your neighbor? Your Aunt Jane with all the cats? Can she leave with 10 minutes notice? Does she have enough clothes and Meow-mix™ for her little friends? Please use this as an example of why preps are so important for every household! Another mandatory evacuation was issued this morning at 4:50am for the east side of Santa Rosa. These fires are very much alive and kicking.

To add insult to injury, we had a magnitude 2.9 earthquake on Tuesday, Day 2 of the fire. Yes, we live in earthquake country as well..... :(

For your viewing pleasure...check out this 747 water bomber. Totally cool!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fox_xom ... e=youtu.be


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:43 pm 
Offline
ZS Donor
ZS Donor
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 10:06 am
Posts: 6547
Location: Maine
Has thanked: 242 times
Been thanked: 411 times
It's absolutely cataclysmic for the communities impacted. In addition to the confirmed deaths, estimates of the people still unaccounted for are in the triple digits, which is alarming.

I've read/heard from a number of different sources that modern forestry and fire management practices may be impacting the severity of wildfires. Something to do with natural wildfire cycles being necessary to cull dead trees from healthy growth before too much combustible fuel accumulates.

Interrupting that natural fire cycle is thought to lead to unnaturally intense and consuming wildfires.

_________________
The Restless Dead http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=113&t=80397

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:49 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:30 am
Posts: 1667
Has thanked: 241 times
Been thanked: 372 times
majorhavoc wrote:
It's absolutely cataclysmic for the communities impacted. In addition to the confirmed deaths, estimates of the people still unaccounted for are in the triple digits, which is alarming.

I've read/heard from a number of different sources that modern forestry and fire management practices may be impacting the severity of wildfires. Something to do with natural wildfire cycles being necessary to cull dead trees from healthy growth before too much combustible fuel accumulates.

Interrupting that natural fire cycle is thought to lead to unnaturally intense and consuming wildfires.

Yea but that dips into EPA rules, permits , politics :words: :words: :words:


Stay safe J-bean. I lived in Cali for fifty years and you have to see it to believe it just how fast those fires can spread. I remember one I saw above Malibu that was going 60 mph

_________________
As of now I bet you got me wrong


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2017 2:03 am 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Posts: 3230
Location: Central Cascadia
Has thanked: 132 times
Been thanked: 268 times
The entire west is/was burning. Over 2,000,000 square acres burnt. That's over 2 Rhode Island's..... 40+ people have died just from the Cali fires, perhaps more. It's been crazy out here but, it doesn't make a heck of s lot of news because it doesn't look cool from the satilite views and they are t really predictable.

Hopefully they get under control soon.

_________________
JeeperCreeper wrote:
I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:
Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:45 am 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 6:54 pm
Posts: 6742
Location: VA
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 86 times
I am most saddened for the people who went to bed thinking they were probably safe and were overtaken in the night. One family tried to escape, but were all injured save for one boy who didn't make it. The news article I read said the family were all in poor condition and hadn't even been told yet that their boy perished in the fire. Another couple survived by facing the possibility of hypothermia in a neighbor's pool. A college girl came home to evacuate her dog, but the road became impassible, so she went back home for her bicycle, putting her big dog in a duffel bag over her arms and narrowly escaped by getting past the blockage in the road and being picked up by a truck driver.

One man said he went to bed thinking he and his family were probably safe because the fire was 11 miles away. If I'm ever within 20 miles of a wildfire, I think I'll just go ahead and get out.

In many towns in tornado prone areas, they have air raid sirens to alert residents to incoming tornadoes. Seems like it would be a good idea to have such things in California towns where wildfires are a possibility. That way, these people could have been awoken by something other than police and neighbors scrambling door-to-door in seriously dangerous conditions.

_________________
Feed science, not zombies!

Failure is the path of least persistence.

“People had more than they needed. We had no idea what was precious and what wasn't. We threw away things people kill each other for now.” ~Book of Eli

∩(=^_^=)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:50 am 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:30 am
Posts: 1667
Has thanked: 241 times
Been thanked: 372 times
Anianna wrote:
I am most saddened for the people who went to bed thinking they were probably safe and were overtaken in the night. One family tried to escape, but were all injured save for one boy who didn't make it. The news article I read said the family were all in poor condition and hadn't even been told yet that their boy perished in the fire. Another couple survived by facing the possibility of hypothermia in a neighbor's pool. A college girl came home to evacuate her dog, but the road became impassible, so she went back home for her bicycle, putting her big dog in a duffel bag over her arms and narrowly escaped by getting past the blockage in the road and being picked up by a truck driver.

One man said he went to bed thinking he and his family were probably safe because the fire was 11 miles away. If I'm ever within 20 miles of a wildfire, I think I'll just go ahead and get out.

In many towns in tornado prone areas, they have air raid sirens to alert residents to incoming tornadoes. Seems like it would be a good idea to have such things in California towns where wildfires are a possibility. That way, these people could have been awoken by something other than police and neighbors scrambling door-to-door in seriously dangerous conditions.


I don't know what preparations they had ( have ) in place for the fires now occurring in Nor. Cal. I do know before the 2003 fire siege in So. Cal. , in the San Bernadino Mts. Communities had numerous evacuation plan town meetings, mass mailings of evacuation details and pre positioned traffic cones and signs . When the fire happened residents were alerted to flee by way of loudspeakers from helocopters. Police vehicles using sirens and loud speakers , Cable , regular tv and radio alerts. They evacuated the whole mountain within a few hours. Any persons without means of evacuating were placed on buses or other vehicles. Any vehicles that became disabled were pushed off the road and the occupants placed in another vehicle.
I would think the communities now threatened would have at least preparations as good as those from 14 years ago. The speed and intensity of these kinds of fires is incredible. Racing along the ground while blowing embers far in advance ( sometimes miles ) . The vegetation literally explodes into flames from the out gassing of the plants and trees from the heat.

_________________
As of now I bet you got me wrong


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:56 am 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 6:54 pm
Posts: 6742
Location: VA
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 86 times
flybynight wrote:
Anianna wrote:
I am most saddened for the people who went to bed thinking they were probably safe and were overtaken in the night. One family tried to escape, but were all injured save for one boy who didn't make it. The news article I read said the family were all in poor condition and hadn't even been told yet that their boy perished in the fire. Another couple survived by facing the possibility of hypothermia in a neighbor's pool. A college girl came home to evacuate her dog, but the road became impassible, so she went back home for her bicycle, putting her big dog in a duffel bag over her arms and narrowly escaped by getting past the blockage in the road and being picked up by a truck driver.

One man said he went to bed thinking he and his family were probably safe because the fire was 11 miles away. If I'm ever within 20 miles of a wildfire, I think I'll just go ahead and get out.

In many towns in tornado prone areas, they have air raid sirens to alert residents to incoming tornadoes. Seems like it would be a good idea to have such things in California towns where wildfires are a possibility. That way, these people could have been awoken by something other than police and neighbors scrambling door-to-door in seriously dangerous conditions.


I don't know what preparations they had ( have ) in place for the fires now occurring in Nor. Cal. I do know before the 2003 fire siege in So. Cal. , in the San Bernadino Mts. Communities had numerous evacuation plan town meetings, mass mailings of evacuation details and pre positioned traffic cones and signs . When the fire happened residents were alerted to flee by way of loudspeakers from helocopters. Police vehicles using sirens and loud speakers , Cable , regular tv and radio alerts. They evacuated the whole mountain within a few hours. Any persons without means of evacuating were placed on buses or other vehicles. Any vehicles that became disabled were pushed off the road and the occupants placed in another vehicle.
I would think the communities now threatened would have at least preparations as good as those from 14 years ago. The speed and intensity of these kinds of fires is incredible. Racing along the ground while blowing embers far in advance ( sometimes miles ) . The vegetation literally explodes into flames from the out gassing of the plants and trees from the heat.


I dunno. There's body cam of a cop knocking on doors in the midst of flame and smoke in the night. His siren is not on, but his lights are. The college girl had to go back because cars were blocking the road. It sounded like that community, at least, was not at all prepared. I was kind of surprised they were not evacuated at 10PM when the fire was known to be 11 miles away. I guess the wind changed unexpectedly or something, but these things are notoriously difficult to predict.

_________________
Feed science, not zombies!

Failure is the path of least persistence.

“People had more than they needed. We had no idea what was precious and what wasn't. We threw away things people kill each other for now.” ~Book of Eli

∩(=^_^=)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 5:42 pm 
Offline
ZS Donor
ZS Donor
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 9:10 am
Posts: 371
Location: CRE
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 21 times
Saw this article today, on what to do if you're trapped in your car trying to escape a wildfire.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/tri ... a-wildfire


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group