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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:37 pm 
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Stercutus wrote:
Quote:
It's been 12 years since Florida had a direct hit. What if direct hits start to get more common?


Direct hits are already more common than every 12 years. Since 1924 there have been 9 Florida landfalls, about once every ten years.


Okay, fine, once every 10 years. I still hold to the concern that the frequency will increase.

Stercutus wrote:
Quote:
Here in North Carolina, some FEMA money that was promised for Matthew recovery is being redirected to Florida for Irma now.

So? They are still going to get the money. It isn't going to stop the recovery efforts since FEMA is still paying for everything. They just need the money on hand for the close fight.

http://www.wral.com/fema-diverts-matthe ... /16950423/

My point was that there isn't enough money to handle too many simultaneous recoveries. If the frequency of disasters increase, this will continue to be a concern. Delays can make or break some families and small businesses.

Stercutus wrote:
Quote:
My fear is that this level of destruction eventually becomes a usual level.


In my mind we are trying to solve a drug problem by giving out more drugs. Look at satellite photos of the coast say 30 years ago compared to today. The amount of development is stupid.

I don't disagree. It's an important topic and probably warrants its own thread. My original concern is that the post I quoted sounds like was discounting any possible increase in intensity or frequency in hurricanes. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but I got enough of a whiff of complacency that it moved me to respond. I am arguing that there is enough evidence to at least prepare for the possibility that there will be increases. Yes, make better risk assessment for decisions; yes, stop overdeveloping the coast and don't move to hurricane- and flood- prone areas; but ALSO plan for the possibility of more future hurricane seasons where resources will be very tight trying to recover from many simultaneous disasters.


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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:44 pm 
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From ABC (Australia): Hurricane Maria intensifies, threatens Caribbean with second major storm
Quote:
Hurricane Maria intensifies, threatens Caribbean with second major storm Updated 43 minutes ago

A string of eastern Caribbean islands are facing their second major storm this month as Hurricane Maria heads towards them with intense winds, heavy rains, and dangerous storm surges.

Key points:

Maria is expected to make landfall in the eastern Caribbean this afternoon

Businesses are shut down, transport is suspended, residents told not to go outside

Residents are lost for words having just dealt with record-breaking Hurricane Irma

Officials on islands from French-controlled Martinique to the US Virgin Islands warned residents to prepare for the storm, which was upgraded to a major category four on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale by US forecasters.

Maria was located about 55 kilometres east of Martinique and was headed west-north-west on a track that would put it over the US territory of Puerto Rico by Tuesday night or Wednesday (local time), the US National Hurricane Centre (NHC) said this morning.

The NCH said the hurricane had maximum sustained winds of 215 kilometres per hour.

Streets were flooded in some residential parts of the island of Barbados, which had been experiencing heavy rain since Sunday as the storm approached.

Some island residents fled the ahead of the storm.

Among them was Beth Tamplin Jones, 45, who rode out Hurricane Irma earlier this month in the pantry of a friend's house on St John in the US Virgin Islands.

"It was so intense," said Ms Jones, who evacuated from St John to Puerto Rico last week and then got a flight to Atlanta, where she plans to remain until Maria passed.

Quote:
"We're in hurricane alley, so we've had other storms, but nothing like this."

"I don't think anybody's ever been hit by a storm like [Irma]. To see another one coming is just so discouraging."

Maria was expected to bring storm surges — seawater driven ashore by wind — of up to nearly three metres, the NHC said. Parts of the central and southern Leeward Islands could see as much as half a metre of rain, it said.

Hurricane and tropical storm warnings and watches were in effect for a string of islands in the area, including the US and British Virgin Islands, Antigua and Barbuda and the French-Dutch island of Saint Martin.

Several of those islands were devastated earlier this month when Hurricane Irma rampaged through the Caribbean as one of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes ever recorded, killing more than 80 people on the islands and the US mainland.

'To go outside is to play with death'

Meteo France issued a red alert for Martinique. Businesses were ordered to shut down, public transport services suspended and residents told to take shelter in their houses.

"The risks are enormous given the winds we expect. To go outside in these conditions is to play with death," Lieutenant Colonel Michael Bernier, a senior civil defence agency official in Martinique, said.

Cyclones v Hurricanes

Ever wondered what the difference is between a hurricane and a cyclone? Our guide has got you covered.
Puerto Rico, a US territory which Irma grazed as it headed toward Cuba and Florida, opened shelters and began to dismantle construction cranes that could be vulnerable to Maria's high winds.

"It is time to seek refuge with a family member, friend, or move to a state shelter because rescuers will not go out and risk their lives once winds reach [80 kilometres] per hour," Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello told reporters on Monday.

More than 1,700 residents of Barbuda were evacuated to neighbouring Antigua after Irma damaged nearly every building there.

Forecasters were also tracking category one Hurricane Jose, which packed 120 kilometre-per-hour winds and was located about 430 kilometres east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

The eye of that storm was forecast to remain off the east coast of the United States for the next few days, bringing dangerous surf and rip currents from Delaware through Massachusetts.

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 7:04 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:08 pm 
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Quote:
Hurricane Maria is now an "extremely dangerous" Category 5 storm
-NPR

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:31 pm 
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From NPR: A Week After Irma, Florida Families Still Living In The Dark
Quote:
A Week After Irma, Florida Families Still Living In The Dark September 18, 2017 3:20 PM ET By Elissa Nadworny

For the past nine days, Nancy Schneider has circled the date on her calendar, pinned up on the wall in her kitchen. She's tracking how long she and her husband have been without power since Hurricane Irma hit Florida.

Last Monday, two-thirds of the state — more than 6.5 million customers — were without power. Crews have worked aggressively since then to restore as many homes and businesses as possible but, more than a week after the storm came ashore, around 400,000 people are still without power.

In the Holly Lake Mobile Home park where Nancy and her husband Christian live, there are blocks of houses that have power. She says it's "disheartening" that "less than a football field away there's power, but we're here standing in the dark." Their neighborhood in Pembroke Pines, north of Miami, backs up against the Everglades. When we walk a block from their house — to check on their older neighbors — it's clear that the combination of heavy winds and tall trees have done some damage to the power lines.

The heat is their biggest concern — temperatures in South Florida have been in the 90s this week. A neighbor lent them a generator a few days ago — so they've been using that to power their fridge and fans — bringing the temperature down to the high 80s from above 100. Christian is thinking he might unplug the fridge for a few hours so he can watch some television — maybe catch up on the news they've been living, but not watching, for the past week.

"You don't realize until you lose electricity that that basically runs your life, you want to make coffee in the morning. You can't. No laundry, no hot showers," Nancy says. "It's like living in the 1700s."

Every morning they start the day the same, with a call to Florida Power and Light. On a recent visit, we sit at their kitchen table — lit up only by candlelight and try the number again. There's no update. Maybe tomorrow, Nancy says with a sigh.

FPL said in press conferences last week that residents do not need to call in outages because their system is equipped to detect them. The company also says it prioritized restoring power to critical functions like hospitals and will now "keep working through the night until we're done."

"So many unknowns, and to me that's the hardest part — not knowing," Nancy says.

One thing she does know: Broward County schools are reopening this week. Nancy is a special education teacher, so even without power at home, she has to report to work. "I guess I'll just be getting ready for work in the dark," she tells me. She walks over to the bathroom with a flashlight, to see if she'll have enough light to do makeup in the morning. She holds up the light to her face. She's not convinced — laughing that she looks like she's about to tell a ghost story, rather than put on some mascara.

The couple hopes this is their last hurricane season — they've just bought a big old house in Western Pennsylvania. They think the biggest weather they'll have to deal with now is some snow — and really, after Andrew, Wilma and Irma — Nancy and Christian aren't worried. After all, they tell me, snowstorms don't even have names.

The pics for this story look too large to post.

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:25 pm 
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Pretty sure we were without power for ten days after Irene. Always good to be ready for long-term power outages.


Quote:
The couple hopes this is their last hurricane season — they've just bought a big old house in Western Pennsylvania. They think the biggest weather they'll have to deal with now is some snow — and really, after Andrew, Wilma and Irma — Nancy and Christian aren't worried. After all, they tell me, snowstorms don't even have names.


Yea, 'cause losing power in an ice storm is so much better than losing power in warm weather. *wink wink*

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:54 pm 
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Anianna wrote:
Pretty sure we were without power for ten days after Irene. Always good to be ready for long-term power outages.


Quote:
The couple hopes this is their last hurricane season — they've just bought a big old house in Western Pennsylvania. They think the biggest weather they'll have to deal with now is some snow — and really, after Andrew, Wilma and Irma — Nancy and Christian aren't worried. After all, they tell me, snowstorms don't even have names.


Yea, 'cause losing power in an ice storm is so much better than losing power in warm weather. *wink wink*

:lol: :lol: :lol: No shat

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:55 pm 
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MPMalloy wrote:
Quote:
Hurricane Maria is now an "extremely dangerous" Category 5 storm
-NPR

Well that escalated quickly

ZCZC MIATCPAT5 ALL
TTAA00 KNHC DDHHMM

BULLETIN
Hurricane Maria Special Advisory Number 11
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL152017
800 PM AST Mon Sep 18 2017

...MARIA BECOMES A POTENTIALLY CATASTROPHIC CATEGORY 5 HURRICANE...
...THE EYE AND THE INTENSE INNER CORE IS NEARING DOMINICA...


SUMMARY OF 800 PM AST...0000 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...15.3N 61.1W
ABOUT 15 MI...25 KM ESE OF DOMINICA
ABOUT 40 MI...70 KM N OF MARTINIQUE
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...160 MPH...260 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...WNW OR 300 DEGREES AT 9 MPH...15 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...925 MB...27.32 INCHES


WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

The government of France has changed the Hurricane Warning to a
Tropical Storm Warning for Martique.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for...
* Guadeloupe
* Dominica
* St. Kitts, Nevis, and Montserrat
* U.S. Virgin Islands
* British Virgin Islands
* Puerto Rico, Culebra, and Vieques

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for...
* Antigua and Barbuda
* Saba and St. Eustatius
* St. Maarten
* Anguilla
* St. Lucia
* Martinique

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for...
* Saba and St. Eustatius
* St. Maarten
* St. Martin and St. Barthelemy
* Anguilla
* Isla Saona to Puerto Plata

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for...
* St. Vincent and the Grenadines
* West of Puerto Plata to the northern Dominican Republic-Haiti
border

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected
somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and
property should be rushed to completion.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
expected somewhere within the warning area.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible
within the watch area. A watch is typically issued 48 hours
before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force
winds, conditions that make outside preparations difficult or
dangerous.

A Tropical Storm Watch means that tropical storm conditions are
possible within the watch area, generally within 48 hours.

Interests elsewhere in Hispaniola should monitor the progress of
this system. Additional watches and warnings may be required later
tonight or on Tuesday.

For storm information specific to your area in the United
States, including possible inland watches and warnings, please
monitor products issued by your local National Weather Service
forecast office. For storm information specific to your area outside
the United States, please monitor products issued by your national
meteorological service.


DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
------------------------------
At 800 PM AST (0000 UTC), the eye of Hurricane Maria was located
near latitude 15.3 North, longitude 61.1 West. Maria is moving
toward the west-northwest near 9 mph (15 km/h), and this general
motion is expected to continue through Wednesday. On the forecast
track, the core of Maria will move near Dominica and the adjacent
Leeward Islands during the next few hours, over the extreme
northeastern Caribbean Sea the remainder of tonight and Tuesday, and
approach Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands Tuesday night and
Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 160 mph (260 km/h) with higher
gusts. Maria is a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson
Hurricane Wind Scale. Some additional strengthening is possible
tonight, but some fluctuations in intensity are likely during the
next day or two.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the
center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles
(205 km).

The estimated minimum central pressure based on Air Force Hurricane
Hunter data is 925 mb (27.32 inches).


HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
WIND: Hurricane conditions should be spreading across Dominica,
Guadeloupe, and Martinique during the next few hours, with tropical
storm conditions already occurring over portions of the Leeward
Islands. Hurricane conditions should spread through the remainder
of the hurricane warning area tonight through Wednesday. Hurricane
conditions are possible within the hurricane watch area Tuesday
through Wednesday, with tropical storm conditions possible
tonight. Tropical storm conditions are possible in the tropical
storm watch area in St. Vincent and the Grenadines through tonight,
and are possible in the tropical storm watch area in the Dominican
Republic on Wednesday.

Wind speeds atop and on the windward sides of hills and mountains
are often up to 30 percent stronger than the near-surface
winds indicated in this advisory, and in some elevated locations
could be even greater.

STORM SURGE: A dangerous storm surge accompanied by large and
destructive waves will raise water levels by as much as 6 to 9 feet
above normal tide levels in the hurricane warning area near where
the center of Maria moves across the Leeward Islands and the
British Virgin Islands.

The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause
normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters
moving inland from the shoreline. The water is expected to reach
the following heights above ground if the peak surge occurs at the
time of high tide...

Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands...6 to 9 ft

The deepest water will occur along the immediate coast near and to
the north and east of the landfall location, where the surge will be
accompanied by large and destructive waves. Surge-related
flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge and the tidal
cycle, and can vary greatly over short distances. For information
specific to your area, please see products issued by your local
National Weather Service forecast office.

RAINFALL: Maria is expected to produce the following rain
accumulations through Thursday:

Central and southern Leeward Islands...10 to 15 inches, isolated 20
inches.
U.S. and British Virgin Islands...10 to 15 inches, isolated 20
inches.
Puerto Rico...12 to 18 inches, isolated 25 inches.
Northern Leeward Islands from Barbuda to Anguilla...4 to 8 inches,
isolated 10 inches.
Windward Islands and Barbados...2 to 4 inches, isolated 6 inches.
Eastern Dominican Republic...4 to 8 inches, isolated 12 inches.

Rainfall on all of these islands could cause life-threatening flash
floods and mudslides.

SURF: Swells generated by Maria are affecting the Lesser Antilles.
These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip
current conditions. Please consult products from your local
weather office.


NEXT ADVISORY
-------------
Next intermediate advisory at 800 PM AST.
Next complete advisory at 1100 PM AST.

$$
Forecaster Brown

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:21 pm 
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000
WTNT35 KNHC 192357
TCPAT5

BULLETIN
Hurricane Maria Intermediate Advisory Number 15A
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL152017
800 PM AST Tue Sep 19 2017

...EYE OF CATEGORY 5 HURRICANE MARIA MOVING CLOSER TO ST CROIX IN
THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS...
...PREPARATIONS AGAINST LIFE-THREATENING STORM SURGE AND RAINFALL
FLOODING AND DESTRUCTIVE WINDS SHOULD BE RUSHED TO COMPLETION...


SUMMARY OF 800 PM AST...0000 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...17.0N 64.2W
ABOUT 60 MI...100 KM SE OF ST. CROIX
ABOUT 160 MI...255 KM SE OF SAN JUAN PUERTO RICO
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...175 MPH...280 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...WNW OR 300 DEGREES AT 10 MPH...17 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...909 MB...26.84 INCHES


WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

The Meteorological Service of Antigua has discontinued the
Hurricane Warning for St. Kitts, Nevis, and Montserrat. The
Tropical Storm Warning and Hurricane Watch for Anguilla has also
been discontinued.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for...
* U.S. Virgin Islands
* British Virgin Islands
* Puerto Rico, Culebra, and Vieques
* Dominican Republic from Cabo Engano to Puerto Plata

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for...
* Saba and St. Eustatius
* St. Maarten
* Guadeloupe
* Dominican Republic west of Puerto Plata to the northern border of
the Dominican Republic and Haiti
* Dominican Republic west of Cabo Engano to Punta Palenque

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for...
* Saba and St. Eustatius
* St. Maarten
* St. Martin and St. Barthelemy
* Isla Saona to Cabo Engano
* Turks and Caicos Islands and the Southeastern Bahamas

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected
somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and
property should be rushed to completion.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
expected somewhere within the warning area.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible
within the watch area. A watch is typically issued 48 hours before
the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force winds,
conditions that make outside preparations difficult or dangerous.

Interests elsewhere in Hispaniola and the Bahamas should monitor the
progress of Maria.

For storm information specific to your area in the United
States, including possible inland watches and warnings, please
monitor products issued by your local National Weather Service
forecast office. For storm information specific to your area outside
the United States, please monitor products issued by your national
meteorological service.


DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
------------------------------
At 800 PM AST (0000 UTC), the eye of Hurricane Maria was located
near latitude 17.0 North, longitude 64.2 West. Maria is moving
toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 km/h), and this general
motion is expected to continue through Wednesday night. On the
forecast track, the eye of Maria will move near or over St. Croix
in the U.S. Virgin Islands tonight, cross Puerto Rico on Wednesday,
and then pass just north of the coast of the Dominican Republic
Wednesday night and Thursday.

Reports from an Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft
indicate that maximum sustained winds are near 175 mph (280 km/h)
with higher gusts. Maria is a potentially catastrophic category
5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some
fluctuations in intensity are likely during the next day or so, but
Maria is forecast to remain an extremely dangerous category 4 or 5
hurricane as it moves near or over the Virgin Islands and Puerto
Rico. Slow weakening is expected after the hurricane emerges over
the Atlantic north of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km) from
the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 140
miles (220 km).

The latest minimum central pressure reported by the Hurricane
Hunter aircraft is 909 mb (26.84 inches).


HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
WIND: Hurricane and tropical storm conditions will continue in
portions of the warning area in the Leeward Islands this evening,
and spread into the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico tonight and
Wednesday. Tropical storm conditions are spreading over the Virgin
Islands at this time. Tropical storm conditions should begin
spreading over Puerto Rico within the next few hours. Hurricane
conditions are expected within the hurricane warning area in the
Dominican Republic late Wednesday, with tropical storm conditions
expected by early Wednesday. Tropical storm conditions are expected
in the tropical storm warning areas in the Dominican Republic on
Wednesday. Hurricane and tropical storm conditions are possible on
Thursday in the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern
Bahamas.

Wind speeds atop and on the windward sides of hills and mountains
and on high-rise buildings could be much stronger than the near-
surface winds indicated in this advisory.

STORM SURGE: A dangerous storm surge accompanied by large and
destructive waves will raise water levels by as much as 7 to 11
feet above normal tide levels in the hurricane warning area near
where the center of Maria moves across the Leeward Islands and the
British Virgin Islands.

A dangerous storm surge accompanied by large and destructive waves
will raise water levels by as much as 4 to 6 feet above normal tide
levels in the hurricane warning area in the Dominican Republic, and
1 to 3 ft elsewhere along the northern coasts of the Dominican
Republic and Haiti.

The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause
normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters
moving inland from the shoreline. The water is expected to reach
the following heights above ground if the peak surge occurs at the
time of high tide...

Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands...6 to 9 ft

The deepest water will occur along the immediate coast near and to
the north and east of the landfall location, where the surge will be
accompanied by large and destructive waves. Surge-related
flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge and the tidal
cycle, and can vary greatly over short distances. For information
specific to your area, please see products issued by your local
National Weather Service forecast office.

RAINFALL: Maria is expected to produce the following rain
accumulations through Thursday:

Central and southern Leeward Islands...10 to 15 inches, isolated 20
inches.
U.S. and British Virgin Islands...10 to 15 inches, isolated 20
inches.
Puerto Rico...12 to 18 inches, isolated 25 inches.
Northern Leeward Islands from Barbuda to Anguilla...4 to 8 inches,
isolated 10 inches.
Windward Islands and Barbados...2 to 4 inches, isolated 6 inches.
Eastern Dominican Republic...4 to 8 inches, isolated 12 inches.

Rainfall on all of these islands will cause life-threatening flash
floods and mudslides.

TORNADOES: Several tornadoes are possible over Puerto Rico and the
U. S. Virgin Islands tonight and Wednesday.

SURF: Swells generated by Maria are affecting the Leeward Islands,
Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. These swells are likely to
cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. Please
consult products from your local weather office.


NEXT ADVISORY
-------------
Next complete advisory at 1100 PM AST.


$$
Forecaster Brown

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:11 pm 
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http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/09/19 ... inica.html

Quote:
Tuesday afternoon saw Puerto Rico slammed with rain, and officials have warned residents to leave the Caribbean island or face death.

"You have to evacuate. Otherwise, you're going to die," said Hector Pesquera, Puerto Rico’s public safety commissioner. "I don't know how to make this any clearer."


"We're going to lose a lot of infrastructure in Puerto Rico," Gov. Ricardo Rossello said, adding that an island-wide power outage and communication blackout could likely last for days. "We're going to have to rebuild."


https://www.cbsnews.com/news/hurricane- ... -supplies/

Quote:
Puerto Rico has imposed a rationing of basic supplies including water and baby formula as Hurricane Maria approaches as a Category 5 storm.

Officials said Monday that the rationing is necessary to ensure everyone has access to basic items such as batteries, milk, canned foods, flashlights and other supplies. It does not apply to gasoline or other fuels.

Shelves at many stores were emptying out quickly as people rushed to finalize hurricane preparations. Many posted desperate pleas on social media for help in finding certain items.

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 2:21 pm 
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Puerto Rico got whacked hard by Hurricane Maria.

https://www.yahoo.com/gma/hurricane-mar ... ories.html

Quote:
All of Puerto Rico was without power by Wednesday afternoon, officials said, just hours after Hurricane Maria made landfall on the island as a Category 4 storm.

Puerto Rico Office of Emergency Management Agency confirmed that 100 percent of the U.S. territory has lost power, noting that anyone with electricity is using a generator.

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello said Maria has caused severe damage to infrastructure. A Category 4 storm has not hit the island since 1932.

Rossello told local newspaper El Nuevo Dia, which streamed the telephone interview live on Facebook, windows had shattered, rivers were overflowing and trees had fallen.

As of 2 p.m. ET, Maria had weakened to a Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds down to 155 mph as the storm moved over Puerto Rico, according to the National Hurricane Center.

A weather station near Arecibo, some 43 miles from San Juan, reported a sustained wind of 71 mph and a wind gust of 91 mph on Wednesday morning.



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 3:26 pm 
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From NPR: Reports Indicate Hurricane Maria May Have Knocked Out Power To All Of Puerto Rico
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Reports Indicate Hurricane Maria May Have Knocked Out Power To All Of Puerto Rico September 20, 2017 7:30 AM ET By Doreen McCallister and Amy Held

Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

The head of Puerto Rico's emergency management agency says Hurricane Maria may have knocked out critical high-voltage power lines on the island — which would mean that essentially all of Puerto Rico is without power.

"When we can get outside, we will find our island destroyed," Abner Gómez of the emergency management agency said at a news conference Wednesday. "The information we received is not encouraging. It's a system that has destroyed everything it has had in its wake."

After devastating parts of the Caribbean, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico early Wednesday as a Category 4 storm packing powerful sustained winds of 155 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

It is the strongest storm to have hit the U.S. territory in decades.

"Very high winds are just tearing trees apart," Miguel Santiago with member station WRTU in San Juan reported Wednesday morning. "Most of the island is without power ... or water."

Maria came ashore at 6:15 a.m. ET near the eastern municipality of Yabucoa. As the eye moved offshore in the afternoon, Maria lost some of its punch and was downgraded to a Category 3 storm on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale, with sustained winds near 115 mph. At 2 p.m. ET, the hurricane was located 15 miles west of the Puerto Rican city of Arecibo and moving northwest at 12 mph.

"The center will then pass offshore of the northeastern coast of the Dominican Republic tonight and Thursday and then move near the Turks and Caicos Islands and southeastern Bahamas Thursday night and Friday," according to the hurricane center's 2 p.m. advisory.

"The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland," the center said, adding that rainfall could reach 25 inches in some places in Puerto Rico through Friday.

Widespread flooding was reported across the island, according to The Associated Press, in addition to damage from the punishing winds that ripped doors off hinges and sent roofs airborne.

"One of the shelters in San Juan had to relocate refugees to the hallways because of the roof, it was shaking due to the winds," Santiago said.

The last Category 4 hurricane to make landfall in Puerto Rico was in 1932. Two weeks ago, Puerto Rico avoided the worst of Irma, which went on to strike Florida.

In the days before Maria hit the island, Puerto Ricans were urged to heed hurricane warnings and evacuation orders.

"We expect severe devastation," Gov. Ricardo Rosselló told NPR on Tuesday. "We have about 500 shelters. People have been trickling into those shelters. But really, we have some weak infrastructure in terms of some of the homes that we have in Puerto Rico."

By Wednesday morning, more than 11,000 people on the island had gone to shelters to wait out Maria, the governor tweeted.

As the storm hit, Rosselló said on Twitter that "God is with us; we are stronger than any hurricane. Together we're going to get up." He said he has asked President Trump to declare Puerto Rico a disaster zone, which would clear the way to federal aid, according to AP.

Elie Feingold of Dallas was riding out the storm at a San Juan hotel. On Wednesday, he said on Facebook: "The tops of all the palms are gone, many other trees and traffic poles are down, roofs are torn off, and the city remains completely hunkered down waiting for the next round."

He told NPR that he came to the island to be with a friend who had his leg amputated. "Nobody should go through that alone." He said his friend's hospital room "has significant water on the floor, and still has no air conditioning (it is hot and humid here)."

Elsewhere in the Caribbean, the eye of the storm passed within 20 miles of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands early Wednesday morning, according to the NHC.

Gov. Kenneth Mapp warned residents to remain cautious as strong winds continued to lash the island. "Don't be asleep. It's okay to rest, but be vigilant and aware of what's going on around your property," Mapp said, according to The Miami Herald.

Nykole Tyson, director of public relations for the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Health, spoke to NPR from her office on St. Croix. "We could feel the building shake," she said. "It was very very frightening to put it lightly." She described trees down, roofs blown off and widespread flooding.

When Hurricane Irma devastated St. Thomas earlier this month, its hospital was evacuated and "some patients went to Puerto Rico and some went to St. Croix," Tyson said. Now those patients are experiencing the unwelcome déjà vu of a second major storm in as many weeks. That includes one Irma evacuee, now on St. Croix with her newborn, who cannot return home to St. Thomas, Tyson said, "because there is nowhere for her to really go or be cared for."

Some hospital patients on St. Croix had to be moved into the hallways on Wednesday, "because of water coming through and flooding all in different rooms," Tyson said.

Michelle Davis, health commissioner of the U.S. Virgin Islands, told NPR, "It's going to be a long recovery, but we have the total and full support of the federal government."

A picture of the damage Maria wrought on neighboring St. Thomas, which experienced some of the worst of Irma's wrath, was beginning to emerge Wednesday. "I've seen more telephone poles down across driveways," Gene Brin, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer on St. Thomas, told NPR. "Since the ground was already saturated because of Irma ... it has magnified the flooding."

As the storm moved across the Caribbean, it blew over the tiny island of Dominica late Monday. An adviser to Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit says the storm killed at least seven people there, according to the AP.

Skerrit took to social media as the storm hit, posting multiple times about the devastation. He wrote in one entry, "My roof is gone. I am at the complete mercy of the hurricane. House is flooding."

He later said he had been rescued. In his last Facebook post, in the early hours of Tuesday, he said: "Initial reports are of widespread devastation. So far we have lost all what money can buy and replace. ... My focus now is in rescuing the trapped and securing medical assistance for the injured.

"We will need help, my friend, we will need help of all kinds."

At least two people also were killed on the island of Guadeloupe as Maria moved northwest through the Caribbean, the AP reports. Two others aboard a boat were reported missing off La Desirade island, officials told the news agency.

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 3:30 pm 
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St. Croix had a live webcam in Christianstead, but it hasn't been up. I wonder if it is even still there. I wish I had thought to watch it when Irma came through.

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From NPR: Puerto Rico Energy Infrastructure Is 'Completely Down,' Governor Says
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Puerto Rico Energy Infrastructure Is 'Completely Down,' Governor Says September 20, 2017 7:30 AM ET By Doreen McCallister & Amy Held

Updated at 9:50 p.m. ET

Hurricane Maria has damaged Puerto Rico's power infrastructure in ways that, in a worst-case scenario, could take months to repair, Gov. Ricardo Rosselló told CNN late Wednesday.

"Our telecommunications system is partially down," he said. "Our energy infrastructure is completely down."

Rosselló said that the island's energy infrastructure is "a little bit old, mishandled and weak," and towers carrying high-voltage lines may have been toppled by the storm. The National Guard will assess the lines from the air once conditions are safer, he said.

The head of Puerto Rico's emergency management agency said such damage would leave the entire island without power.

"When we can get outside, we will find our island destroyed," Abner Gómez of the emergency management agency said at a news conference Wednesday. "The information we received is not encouraging. It's a system that has destroyed everything it has had in its wake."

There had been one death reported so far — a man who was struck by a flying board, Rosselló said.

On Wednesday afternoon, Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, in a tweet, ordered a mandatory curfew from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. until Saturday morning.

Only health care workers, emergency officials, police, journalists and citizens who are dealing with an emergency situation are exempted, he said.

After devastating parts of the Caribbean, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico early Wednesday as a Category 4 storm packing powerful sustained winds of 155 mph, according to the hurricane center.

It is the strongest storm to have hit the U.S. territory in decades.

But as the storm moved offshore, it weakened to a Category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph, according to the 8 p.m. advisory issued by the National Hurricane Center. Maria is 55 miles east-northeast of Punta Cana, Dominican Republic.

"Very high winds are just tearing trees apart," Miguel Santiago with member station WRTU in San Juan, Puerto Rico, reported Wednesday morning. "Most of the island is without power ... or water."

Maria came ashore at 6:15 a.m. ET near the eastern municipality of Yabucoa. As the eye moved offshore in the afternoon, Maria lost some of its punch and was initially downgraded to a Category 3 storm on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale, with sustained winds near 115 mph.

"The center will ... pass offshore of the northeastern coast of the Dominican Republic tonight and Thursday and then move near the Turks and Caicos Islands and southeastern Bahamas Thursday night and Friday," according to the 8 p.m. advisory.

The advisory says Maria could strengthen during the next day or two and regain major hurricane status by Thursday.

Widespread flooding was reported across Puerto Rico, according to The Associated Press, in addition to damage from the punishing winds that ripped doors off hinges and sent roofs airborne.

"One of the shelters in San Juan had to relocate refugees to the hallways because of the roof — it was shaking due to the winds," Santiago said.

The last Category 4 hurricane to make landfall in Puerto Rico was in 1932. Two weeks ago, Puerto Rico avoided the worst of Irma, which went on to strike Florida.

In the days before Maria hit the island, Puerto Ricans were urged to heed hurricane warnings and evacuation orders.

"We expect severe devastation," Rosselló told NPR on Tuesday. "We have about 500 shelters. People have been trickling into those shelters. But really, we have some weak infrastructure in terms of some of the homes that we have in Puerto Rico."

By Wednesday morning, more than 11,000 people on the island had gone to shelters to wait out Maria, the governor tweeted.

As the storm hit, Rosselló said on Twitter that "God is with us; we are stronger than any hurricane. Together we're going to get up." He said he has asked President Trump to declare Puerto Rico a disaster zone, which would clear the way to federal aid, according to AP.

Elie Feingold of Dallas was riding out the storm at a San Juan hotel. On Wednesday, he said on Facebook: "The tops of all the palms are gone, many other trees and traffic poles are down, roofs are torn off, and the city remains completely hunkered down waiting for the next round."

He told NPR that he came to the island to be with a friend who had his leg amputated. "Nobody should go through that alone." He said his friend's hospital room "has significant water on the floor and still has no air conditioning (it is hot and humid here)."

Elsewhere in the Caribbean, the eye of the storm passed within 20 miles of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands early Wednesday morning, according to the NHC.

Gov. Kenneth Mapp warned residents to remain cautious as strong winds continued to lash the island. "Don't be asleep. It's okay to rest, but be vigilant and aware of what's going on around your property," Mapp said, according to The Miami Herald.

Nykole Tyson, director of public relations for the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Health, spoke to NPR from her office on St. Croix. "We could feel the building shake," she said. "It was very, very frightening to put it lightly." She described downed trees, blown-off roofs and widespread flooding.

When Hurricane Irma devastated St. Thomas earlier this month, its hospital was evacuated and "some patients went to Puerto Rico and some went to St. Croix," Tyson said. Now those patients are experiencing the unwelcome déjà vu of a second major storm in as many weeks. That includes one Irma evacuee, now on St. Croix with her newborn, who cannot return home to St. Thomas, Tyson said, "because there is nowhere for her to really go or be cared for."

Some hospital patients on St. Croix had to be moved into the hallways on Wednesday "because of water coming through and flooding all in different rooms," Tyson said.

Michelle Davis, health commissioner of the U.S. Virgin Islands, told NPR, "It's going to be a long recovery, but we have the total and full support of the federal government."

A picture of the damage Maria wreaked on neighboring St. Thomas, which experienced some of the worst of Irma's wrath, was beginning to emerge Wednesday. "I've seen more telephone poles down across driveways," Gene Brin, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer on St. Thomas, told NPR. "Since the ground was already saturated because of Irma ... it has magnified the flooding."

As the storm moved across the Caribbean, it blew over the tiny island of Dominica late Monday. An adviser to Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit says the storm killed at least seven people there, according to the AP.

Skerrit took to social media as the storm hit, posting multiple times about the devastation. He wrote in one entry, "My roof is gone. I am at the complete mercy of the hurricane. House is flooding."

He later said he had been rescued. In his last Facebook post, in the early hours of Tuesday, he said: "Initial reports are of widespread devastation. So far we have lost all what money can buy and replace. ... My focus now is in rescuing the trapped and securing medical assistance for the injured.

"We will need help, my friend, we will need help of all kinds."

At least two people also were killed on the island of Guadeloupe as Maria moved northwest through the Caribbean, the AP reports. Two others aboard a boat were reported missing off La Desirade island, officials told the news agency.

NPR's Christopher Dean Hopkins contributed to this report.


This is an updated story that I posted earlier.

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 12:56 am 
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Well..looks like PR is in for a rough time.

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Part of an email from a friend in Puerto Rico
___________________________________________________

Hey guys,

I am OK my boys are all safe. Haven't had word from my husband or mother yet. The office is damaged. Generator not working and cell service gone on most of the island. I haven't attempted to try getting home yet. I will connect back up next week.

It is as bad as the news have reported it to be.

Bye for now,

X

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:37 am 
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teotwaki wrote:
Part of an email from a friend in Puerto Rico
___________________________________________________

Hey guys,

I am OK my boys are all safe. Haven't had word from my husband or mother yet. The office is damaged. Generator not working and cell service gone on most of the island. I haven't attempted to try getting home yet. I will connect back up next week.

It is as bad as the news have reported it to be.

Bye for now,

X

Wow. Hope all is okay...as good as it can be anyway. This sounds like the game Dead Island...without the walking dead part.

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:59 am 
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This article has videos and pictures.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... icane.html

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The USS KEARSARGE (LHD 3) is likely docking today.
http://www.public.navy.mil/surflant/lhd ... fault.aspx

In the aftermath of Katrina when the sistership USS Iwo Jima arrived dockside in NOLA about Sept 7ish the capability it provided basically turned the tide on the lawlessness. This is the perfect asset for this type of disaster. It has berthing space, a flight deck huge fresh water production capability and command and control communication.

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From FEMA via an email:
Quote:
Steps for Cleaning Up After a Flood:
Coming Home After a Flood:

After flooding, it is important to know how to clean up safely.

Listen to local authorities to determine when it is safe for you to return home. Do not return home until local officials indicate it is safe to do so. Stay vigilant and monitor radio or TV stations for local emergency management officials’ guidance.

Ensure water is safe to drink, cook, or clean with after a flood. Oftentimes local officials put a boil water order in place following a flood or hurricane.

Remember, never run a generator inside your home, and keep it away from windows, doors, and vents.

Tips from FEMA for clean-up after returning home:

Always wear protective clothing including long-sleeved shirts, long pants, rubber or plastic gloves and waterproof boots or shoes.

Before entering your home, look outside for damaged power lines, gas lines, and other exterior damage.

Take photos of your damage before you begin to clean up and save repair receipts.

Get rid of mold. Mold may have contaminated your home, which raises the health risk for those with asthma, allergies, and breathing conditions. Refer to the Center for Disease Control for more info on mold.

Open doors and windows so your house can air out before spending any length of time inside.

Turn off main electrical power and water systems and do not use gas appliances until a professional can ensure they are safe.

Check all ceilings and floors for signs of sagging or other potentially dangerous structural damage.

Throw out all foods, beverages, and medicines exposed to flood waters or mud including canned goods and containers with food or liquid.

Throw out any items that absorb water and you cannot clean or disinfect (i.e. mattresses, carpeting, stuffed animals, etc.).

Beware of snakes, insects, and other animals that may be on your property or in your home.

Remove all drywall and insulation that has been in contact with floodwaters.

Clean all hard surfaces (flooring, countertops, appliances, sinks, etc.) thoroughly with hot water and soap or detergent.

To learn more about what to do before, during, and after a flood or a hurricane, visit http://www.ready.gov/floods, Prepareathon’s™ Flood and Hurricane pages and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Flood Water After an Emergency or Disaster.

If you experienced a flood or other damages due to recent hurricane activity, please visit http://www.disasterassistance.gov to register for federal assistance.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2017 9:02 pm 
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Status of Puerto Rico:
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1,360 of the island's 1,600 mobile phone towers had been downed, and 85 per cent of above-ground and underground phone and internet cables had been knocked out. Power had also been cut across the territory which has 3.4 million residents.

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From NPR: 'Imminent' Dam Failure Threatens Thousands In Puerto Rico
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'Imminent' Dam Failure Threatens Thousands In Puerto Rico September 23, 2017 5:09 PM ET By Chris Benderev

Officials continued to urge tens of thousands of people living downstream from a precarious, slowly failing dam in northwestern Puerto Rico to evacuate Saturday. But the U.S. territory's severely compromised communications infrastructure meant it was not immediately clear how successful the warnings would be.

The National Weather Service said in an alert Saturday that "dam operators continued to report the threat of a failure of the Guajataca Dam, potentially causing life-threatening flash flooding downstream."

Aerial footage of the dam, inundated by days of heavy rain from Hurricane Maria's passage over the island of Puerto Rico, revealed a torrential flow of water to the river below.

The National Weather Service on Friday called the dam's break "imminent," announced that buses were evacuating locals and implored anyone in the area to get out of the "extremely dangerous situation."

On Friday, officials estimated 70,000 people living near the Guajataca Dam, including in the towns of Quebradillas and Isabela, had been ordered to leave their homes, according to The Associated Press.

Anthony Reynes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Miami, told NPR on Saturday that the evacuation goals had been scaled back considerably. Authorities were now, he said, focused just on reaching the 300 to 500 people along the banks of the river downstream.

Still, getting out the evacuation message was extremely difficult.

That is because Hurricane Maria has demolished the country's power system, which the governor warned could take months to repair, and ruined telecommunications systems.

On Thursday, the FCC estimated that more than 95 percent of Puerto Rico's cellular telephone sites were out of service. The commission added in its report that "large percentages of consumers are without either cable services or wireline services."

Calls were reportedly more difficult outside the U.S. territory's capital, including municipalities like those threatened by the collapsing dam.

"Basically there's no cell communication. There's no online communication," Reynes said, describing the region near the Guajataca Dam.

As the AP reports, the 345-yard, roughly 90-year-old Guajataca Dam developed a crack during the storm, which engineers believe could be an indicator of an eventual complete failure.

Maria made landfall on the eastern coast of Puerto Rico early Wednesday as a Category 4 hurricane — the first since 1932 — with sustained winds of 155 mph. From there, it tore across the U.S. territory, downing buildings and power lines and drenching many spots on the island with about 20 inches of rain. One area near San Juan received 37.9 inches, as NPR's Amity Kelly reported.

Michael Fernandez, the executive director of CARAS, a Puerto Rico-based nonprofit assisting in the recovery, told NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday that the failing dam worried him and that he has received no information from that region of the island.

He said that while he was encouraged by the work of the National Guard and the Army, the recovery ahead seemed daunting.

"This is a completely new life we have to start living," he said.

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From NPR: Cut Off From The World, Puerto Ricans Search For A Ghost Of A Signal
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Cut Off From The World, Puerto Ricans Search For A Ghost Of A Signal September 24, 2017 11:25 PM ET By Camila Domonoske & Marisa Penaloza

On the side of a busy expressway in northern Puerto Rico, dozens of cars stand in a line, parked at careless angles off the shoulder. Drivers hold their phones out of car windows; couples walk along the grass raising their arm skyward.

This is not a picturesque stretch of road. It's about 90 degrees out, and the sun is beating down relentlessly. All you can hear is the rumble of cars and trucks passing by, sometimes dangerously close. Then, inside a Ford Escape near the edge of the highway, Casandra Caba exclaims, "Look!"

Smiling, she holds up her iPhone screen, showing an alert from the messaging app WhatsApp. "I just got a message from a cousin in the Dominican Republic."

Hurricane Maria destroyed large swaths of Puerto Rico's infrastructure when it hit the island last week. Among other things, it wiped out cell service. The island was totally incommunicado — but signals are starting to trickle back in some places, like this stretch along Expressway 22 on the island's northern side.

Caba, her husband and her two children live about 20 minutes from San Juan. They came here for a signal after they noticed the line of cars on the side of the road, and wondered what everyone was doing.

"We parked and realized that we could make phone calls," says Caba's husband, Samuel Garcia. They still haven't been able to contact relatives elsewhere on the island — and with gas shortages, they aren't able to make the drive across the island to check on them. But at least they're able to connect with family abroad.

Naomi Soler and her mom Damaris Varela only wish they had such luck. They drove for about an hour from Arecibo, in the mid-northern part of the island. Neighbors told them they could find a signal on Expressway 22, and they were hoping to call relatives on the mainland — in Florida, New York City, Rhode Island, Maryland.

"I'm trying to reach my dad, my grandmother and my boyfriend, but we don't have any signal," says 26-year-old Soler, with a tinge of frustration in her voice.

Sitting in their car in the unrelenting heat, they're at a loss for what to do — they've been sitting here for about two hours with no signal. "It's fruitless," says Varela.

Marco Dorta, 48, and his daughter Patricia, 21, were also out of luck as they sat on the edge of the expressway.

They'd driven from Isabela, an hour and a half away, to try to find a signal. They, too, wanted to get in touch with relatives and friends in the states, to tell them they were OK, and to let them know what supplies they most desperately needed.

"All we need is one contact," Marco Dorta said. "They'll tell everyone else."

But after an hour of trying different spots along the highway — with three different phones, on three different networks — they were still without reception. Asked how long they'd be willing to wait, Dorta just gave a patient shrug.

Jose Nieves, who also lives in Arecibo, got lucky — after giving up. He was driving along the interstate searching for a signal to get in touch with his mother in the city, an hour away. But he never could make that call, so instead, he drove all the way to see her in person.

On his way home, "I just caught a signal, and I just parked," he said, pantomiming a squealing stop on the side of the freeway. He had his first phone call since the storm began — a brief chat with a friend and business partner in Las Piedras, in the mountains — before the call dropped.

Nieves said clusters of cars like this one dot the freeway between San Juan and Dorado, 15 miles to the west of the capital.

Beyond that, he says, "there's absolutely no hope for a signal," he said. "You'd be dreaming if you think you are going to get something."

And even here, the search is often futile, he notes. Still, people hold their phones in the air, out of car windows, or stand on little hills to try to reach higher — "doing things that I know [are] hopeless," Nieves said. If you don't have a signal, you don't have a signal.

"But, you know, faith is the last thing you lose," he said.

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Looking at the forecast tracks of Maria and Lee. At 2:00pm Saturday they are both within near proximity of each other. Is this like a perfect storm scenario?

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 Post subject: Re: Hurricanes 2017
PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:43 pm 
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Generally when that happens one tears the other apart.

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