Hurricanes 2017

Stuff that’s happening in the world that may pertain to our survival. Please keep political debates off the forum.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by designerchick » Wed Aug 30, 2017 1:37 pm

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designerchick wrote:I'm Tracie, the moderator there. If you want to help send me a pm there and I will give you priority.
I've been watching this page.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by The Commander » Wed Aug 30, 2017 1:53 pm

majorhavoc wrote:Thanks for the update Commander, some of us were wondering how you were fairing in Houston.

Well, I suppose this experience has allowed you to better gauge the risk level for your specific location, for this kind of disaster, at least. It also sounds like you've learned that sheltering in is the best course of action (again, for this type of disaster). That's valuable experience. Did you generally find the level of preps you had to be adequate? Any nuggets of wisdom you can share about something you overlooked that became a blindingly obvious need once Harvey struck?

And of course you haven't answered the real question that's on our minds: did you ever lose Netflix or were you able to binge watch your way though the long hours of waiting?
Thanks for your concern! :) Like I said before, personally I was lulled into a false sense of being prepared and have let my supplies dwindle. I won't let that happen again! I also had to figure things out on the fly, like how to stop rain from seeping in through the floor molding (bathroom towel) and have a bucket and Tupperware containers handy to catch a leaking roof.

Also, many people were trapped and were told to put sheets of paper in their window. I was watching the footage and thought, damn, this would be a good time to have a strobe light in the window. Those folks that had boats and rescued people and donated supplies to the shelters deserve some type of medal for heroism. As soon as most of the roads clear, I'm going out to get some things I previously mentioned. I also ordered some barriers from this place https://hydrabarrier.com but of course, they got stuck at the usps distribution center. I also had my Streamlight Protac flashlight with me day and night.

I never lost Netflix, but I didn't watch much, as I was glued to the 4 major tv stations here and social media and scanned ham radio too. Also kept in constant communication with family to see how they were doing. Believe it or not, there's a thug element our there taking advantage of people, so we gotta watch out for that too. Other than that, we'll take it day by day. God bless Texas!!! :awesome:
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by majorhavoc » Wed Aug 30, 2017 2:54 pm

The Commander wrote: Also, many people were trapped and were told to put sheets of paper in their window. I was watching the footage and thought, damn, this would be a good time to have a strobe light in the window.
Those little blinky lights that clip onto your bicycle are literally designed to get people's attention. Especially in low visibility conditions. They're cheap as dirt and run for hours and hours on a couple of coin cells. Might not be a bad prep (along with spare batteries) if you live in a flood prone area.

Best plan obviously is to never allow yourself to be in a situation where you need a high water rescue, but you never know.

https://smile.amazon.com/Waterproof-Fla ... tail+light

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by raptor » Wed Aug 30, 2017 3:40 pm

majorhavoc wrote:
The Commander wrote: Also, many people were trapped and were told to put sheets of paper in their window. I was watching the footage and thought, damn, this would be a good time to have a strobe light in the window.
Those little blinky lights that clip onto your bicycle are literally designed to get people's attention. Especially in low visibility conditions. They're cheap as dirt and run for hours and hours on a couple of coin cells. Might not be a bad prep (along with spare batteries) if you live in a flood prone area.

Best plan obviously is to never allow yourself to be in a situation where you need a high water rescue, but you never know.

https://smile.amazon.com/Waterproof-Fla ... tail+light
+1 on not hanging around to be trapped.


You also may want to get one of these for the roof and one for the street.
They are cheap and visible. They do not need batteries. It compliments the strobe with better visibility during the day.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by Old_Man » Wed Aug 30, 2017 4:55 pm

I'm sure this has been posted, but just in case... http://www.houstonharveyrescue.com decent clearinghouse for rescues and rescuers.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Aug 30, 2017 5:10 pm

According to NPR, there are 17 fatalities so far. :cry:

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by CG » Wed Aug 30, 2017 5:12 pm

MPMalloy wrote:According to NPR, there are 17 fatalities so far. :cry:
Sad, but still lots less than there were when they tried to evacuate Houston for Hurricane Rita.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by Stercutus » Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:13 pm

CG wrote:
MPMalloy wrote:According to NPR, there are 17 fatalities so far. :cry:
Sad, but still lots less than there were when they tried to evacuate Houston for Hurricane Rita.
Fox is reporting 23. Not that it matters from the safety of my living room. I am sure there will be a lot more before this is all over.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by majorhavoc » Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:27 pm

News accounts are trickling in of at least one family drowned in their vehicle. Apparently their great uncle was trying to drive them to safety long after it was prudent to be out on the submerged streets. I fear there will be more tragic reports like that in the coming days. See multiple posts above re: not allowing yourself to get in the position of needing rescue/making desperate decisions.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by flybynight » Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:03 pm

Texas Mother Dies Saving 3-Year-Old Daughter From Harvey Floods

Colette Sulcer, a 41-year-old Texas woman, was driving in her car on Tuesday with her 3-year-old daughter when, suddenly, she hit high water — the result of unprecedented flooding in Houston, Texas. After she pulled into a parking lot and got out of the car, the flooding's current carried both Sulcer and her child about a half mile. Somewhere along that distance, while keeping her daughter perched above the water, Sulcer drowned, her child, who has not been identified, did not
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:30 pm

Hey Everyone: NPR stated in one of it's stories that the cost of Hurricane Harvey could top 100 Billion. I don't think that government has that much available. APM's Marketplace has been covering the costs of all of this so far. Here is the link: Marketplace.

They get into the economics of things.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by Stercutus » Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:36 pm

Here is the link: Marketplace.
I get a link to an article on electric cars.



I was reading an article the other day about "home owner" in Houston who has a house valued at $140K that the Federal Government has paid $800K in the last 15 years on repairs after flood insurance. I do wonder how long tax payers will continue to pay for their fellow citizens to live in flood zones on the Federal dime.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:49 pm

Stercutus wrote:
Here is the link: Marketplace.
I get a link to an article on electric cars.



I was reading an article the other day about "home owner" in Houston who has a house valued at $140K that the Federal Government has paid $800K in the last 15 years on repairs after flood insurance. I do wonder how long tax payers will continue to pay for their fellow citizens to live in flood zones on the Federal dime.
I see government going both ways on this. A lot of things are coming up that government needs to approve/deny & I have no idea what will come. I have been on gov't disability for over a decade & I have been prepping lately in case that stops. I hear what you said, Stercutus, & I see your point.

Moral Hazard.

Feel free to poke around that page. The stories are there. :)

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Aug 30, 2017 10:56 pm

From NPR:
Riding With A Rescue Mission In The Surreal, Perilous Texas Floods August 30, 2017 6:56 PM ET By John Burnett

Six days after Hurricane Harvey first crossed the Texas coast, Houston is still in rescue mode with people stranded in houses and apartments.

With the authorities overwhelmed by the scope of the flooding, private citizens have been rushing to Houston and towing their own boats to conduct rescues.

Rene Galvan has come to a makeshift boat launch on flooded Highway 90, looking for rescuers. In a soaked, blue hoodie, he sits anxiously in the bow of an aluminum boat, wondering how they're going to get to 14 members of his extended family who have been stranded by rising water.

"We're trying to get my family out. Save 'em," he says. "Help to bring my family back home."

He says his relatives are waiting for him only five minutes away, but that's by car. It will take considerably longer to reach the Galvan family in this boat, along with another one that's helping.

The watercraft have to make their way through an obstacle course of underwater trees and hidden concrete barriers, treacherous currents and submerged tractor-trailers.

After 2 to 3 feet of rain fell over five days, Greens Bayou has swollen into a lake that covers a large section of northeast Houston.

"I had some free time, had a boat in the garage, so it seemed like a good match. Come out and try to extract some people," says Ted Middleton, who drove over from San Antonio towing his V-hull, 40-horsepower bay boat.

"We've just been riding around looking for an extraction. Finally, this one came along," he says.

He's joined by two soldiers in soaked uniforms, Spc. Andrea Viela and Spc. Katie Cash, who asked for a leave from their unit at Fort Hood to come down to Houston.

"[Viela] has family down here," Cash says. "So we came out initially to try to get them out. Then we met Ted, and we've been trying to save as many people as we can now."

The two skiffs motor through a dream sequence of surreal sights in this watery landscape. A black horse wanders along the shoulder of a highway bridge, confused and wet. A fleshy man with a tattooed torso stands impassively in water up to his chest — as though this is all normal — and politely waves off an offer to climb in the boat. A couple hip-deep in water is towing an air mattress carrying two shivering Chihuahua dogs.

Meanwhile, Galvan has reached one of his brothers on his cellphone.

"Stay right there," he says urgently. "We're trying to see if we can drive the boat over there."

The two boats are cruising alongside a road whose condition lives up to its name — Lake Houston Parkway. But the pavement is getting so close it's possible to see yellow lane markers.

"We're running out of water here," Middleton says.

Both volunteer rescuers tie off their vessels. Galvan hops out and sloshes toward a dry street intersection a couple of hundred yards away.

About 20 minutes later, a white Expedition drives down the center of Lake Houston Parkway toward the boats, creating a wake in 2 feet of water. The Galvan clan is packed inside the vehicle — six adults and eight kids, all grinning ear to ear.

"We were at the apartment," says Jaime, Rene Galvan's brother, who is driving. "It wasn't flooded. But the lights went out, so we had to move."

The family saw the water was not going down, the power was not coming back on, and they were about to run out of food. So they called Rene and asked him to find a way to pick them up.

The boatmen decide they'll have to make two trips for the large family, the other rescuers and two journalists. Only one of the two soldiers will ride in the first boat shuttle; how do Viela and Cash decide who goes and who stays?

They play a quick, spirited game of rock, paper, scissors, and Cash wins.

The second boat is piloted by Troy King from the East Texas town of Carthage. He works at a lumber factory making plywood, and fishes for crappie in his flat-bottom boat. He says he saw the Houston floods on the news and it moved him.

"I tell you something I read in the Bible," King says, steering back toward the highway ramp. "There's a passage in 1st John, I'm going to paraphrase: If a man has the resources to take care of people and to help people when they're in need and he doesn't do it, then it's wrong. And that's something that's been on my heart. When I read that I knew I had to do it. And I came down here."

The danger of this epic flood cannot be overstated. Earlier Wednesday, the Harris County Sheriff's Office reported that divers had recovered a family of six, including four children, who drowned in a van that tried to drive through this same body of water, Greens Bayou.

King, dressed in camouflage hip waders, squints at a section of churning floodwaters flowing through a tangle of trees off to the left.

"You don't realize how close to death you are right there," he says.

The Galvan children, one as young as 8, are shivering in their life preservers, but they are clearly having the adventure of their lives. They hold hands and high-step in shallow water on a freeway bridge.

And then — nearly three hours after the rescue started — it's over. The boats nose up to the concrete ramp.

"Thank you," Juana Galvan says. "You're welcome," replies Middleton, helping her out of his boat.

In the drizzling rain, the Galvans pile into two waiting pickup trucks, with the kids sitting in back, and drive to their grandmother's house. There, they take hot showers and eat some tomato soup, and all take a nap.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by absinthe beginner » Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:34 am

Harvey may be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-2 ... oodys-says

Hurricane Harvey could be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history with a potential price tag of $160 billion, according to a preliminary estimate from private weather firm AccuWeather.

This is equal to the combined cost of Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, and represents a 0.8% economic hit to the gross national product, AccuWeather said.

“Parts of Houston, the United States' fourth largest city, will be uninhabitable for weeks and possibly months due to water damage, mold, disease-ridden water and all that will follow this 1,000-year flood,” said AccuWeather president Joel Myers.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by MPMalloy » Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:02 am

absinthe beginner wrote:Harvey may be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-2 ... oodys-says

Hurricane Harvey could be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history with a potential price tag of $160 billion, according to a preliminary estimate from private weather firm AccuWeather.

This is equal to the combined cost of Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, and represents a 0.8% economic hit to the gross national product, AccuWeather said.

“Parts of Houston, the United States' fourth largest city, will be uninhabitable for weeks and possibly months due to water damage, mold, disease-ridden water and all that will follow this 1,000-year flood,” said AccuWeather president Joel Myers.
I myself don't trust the source for accurate math, but it could be. Still early in the game.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by teotwaki » Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:14 am

Strobe light functions are built into a lot of headlamps and flashlights. Buy at least two of whatever you prefer and when needed one can be taped to a window while in strobe mode.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by flybynight » Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:54 am

teotwaki wrote:Strobe light functions are built into a lot of headlamps and flashlights. Buy at least two of whatever you prefer and when needed one can be taped to a window while in strobe mode.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01FS ... UTF8&psc=1

Cheap and bright. I have these scattered around property and vehicles. Give them away to friends and family . If this vendor is out they aren't hard to find by shopping round Amazon.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by RickOShea » Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:05 am

Harvey shuts down major fuel pipeline supplying East Coast

http://money.cnn.com/2017/08/30/investi ... index.html


The Colonial Pipeline, which carries huge amounts of gasoline and other fuel between Houston and the East Coast, is shutting down after Harvey forced the closure of refineries and some of the pipeline's own facilities.

The pipeline has two main lines that together transport more than 100 million gallons of gasoline, heating oil and aviation fuel as far as the New York harbor each day.

Its operator said the line that carries mainly diesel and aviation fuels will stop running Wednesday evening, and the line for gasoline, which is already operating at a reduced rate, will be suspended Thursday....

....Power outages during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 forced the shutdown of parts of the Colonial Pipeline for several days. It also twice had to suspend services last year due to a leak and a fire. Colonial noted that there are other ways of delivering fuel to limit the disruption to supply, including trucks, barges and other pipelines.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by raptor » Thu Aug 31, 2017 10:15 am

flybynight wrote:
teotwaki wrote:Strobe light functions are built into a lot of headlamps and flashlights. Buy at least two of whatever you prefer and when needed one can be taped to a window while in strobe mode.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01FS ... UTF8&psc=1

Cheap and bright. I have these scattered around property and vehicles. Give them away to friends and family . If this vendor is out they aren't hard to find by shopping round Amazon.

I agree these are great! They are bright and use a single AA. They are cheap yet useful. They are not 300 lumens as stated but a very useful 100 +/- lumens.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by raptor » Thu Aug 31, 2017 10:29 am

absinthe beginner wrote:Harvey may be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-2 ... oodys-says

Hurricane Harvey could be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history with a potential price tag of $160 billion, according to a preliminary estimate from private weather firm AccuWeather.

This is equal to the combined cost of Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, and represents a 0.8% economic hit to the gross national product, AccuWeather said.

“Parts of Houston, the United States' fourth largest city, will be uninhabitable for weeks and possibly months due to water damage, mold, disease-ridden water and all that will follow this 1,000-year flood,” said AccuWeather president Joel Myers.
Just doing some back of the envelope math:
Buffet's insurance company said they had coverage on 500,000 cars in the area So lets say 100,000 at an average cost of $25,000 are total write offs that alone is $2.5 billion.
If 250,000 homes between Corpus Christi and Port Arthur sustain $250,000 of damage (the max limit of flood policies) that is $62.5 billion.

This all before you factor in lost wages, businesses being closed and the losses they sustained by not operating. There are major refineries, the Port of Houston and two major airports that were affected.

The loss from Katrina was $108 billion in 2005. Inflation adjust that to 2017 $ and you get $137 billion. Katrina hit LA and MS. This storm affected Houston (the 4th largest city in the US), Corpus Christi, Port Arthur and areas in between.

Katrina affected NOLA the 49th largest city in the US.

So yes I can believe $137 billion in damages is a reasonable estimate.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by RickOShea » Thu Aug 31, 2017 12:11 pm

Oh, what fresh hell is this...

Disturbance in Southern Gulf could strengthen

http://www.themonitor.com/news/local/ar ... d3ef5.html


Forecasters said Wednesday that a low pressure area in the southern Gulf of Mexico has a small chance of strengthening into a tropical storm or depression.

The National Hurricane Center gives the disturbance a 20 percent chance of tropical cyclonic formation.

The low pressure area is headed north and could bring rain to parts of the Texas and Louisiana coasts, including areas already impacted by Tropical Storm Harvey.
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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by MPMalloy » Thu Aug 31, 2017 4:35 pm

From CNBC:
118,000 people and no drinking water: Flooded Beaumont cannot determine when it will restore water supply
The city of Beaumont, Texas, lost its main pump station and its secondary water source. "There is no way to determine how long this will take" to restore the system, city officials said.
By Michael Sheetz | @thesheetztweetz Published 6 Hours Ago | Updated 3 Hours Ago CNBC.com

Early Thursday morning, officials of Beaumont, Texas, announced the city lost both the primary and secondary sources for its water supply system.

"Due to rising waters of the Neches River caused by Tropical Storm Harvey, the City of Beaumont has lost service from the main pump station," Beaumont fire rescue captain Brad Penisson said in a statement.

Located near the Louisiana border on the Gulf Coast, the city of nearly 120,000 residents will be without water until after floodwaters recede and officials can analyze the extent of the damage.

"There is no way to determine how long this will take at this time," Penisson said.

On Monday, Mayor Becky Ames issued a voluntary evacuation for residents close to Pine Island Bayou to the north of the city, but it is unknown how many residents remained in Beaumont during the storm.

Baptist Beaumont Hospital issued a statement after the city's water system failure, saying it will transfer patients "to other acute care facilities," according to KBMT reporter Ezzy Castro.

"We have no other alternatives but to discontinue all services which will unfortunately include emergency services," the hospital said.

Beaumont police have confirmed two storm-related fatalities as of Wednesday morning.

— CNBC's Jodi Gralnick contributed to this report.
I know what that is like.

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Re: Hurricanes 2017

Post by 91Eunozs » Thu Aug 31, 2017 6:34 pm

RickOShea wrote:Harvey shuts down major fuel pipeline supplying East Coast

http://money.cnn.com/2017/08/30/investi ... index.html


The Colonial Pipeline, which carries huge amounts of gasoline and other fuel between Houston and the East Coast, is shutting down after Harvey forced the closure of refineries and some of the pipeline's own facilities.

The pipeline has two main lines that together transport more than 100 million gallons of gasoline, heating oil and aviation fuel as far as the New York harbor each day.

Its operator said the line that carries mainly diesel and aviation fuels will stop running Wednesday evening, and the line for gasoline, which is already operating at a reduced rate, will be suspended Thursday....

....Power outages during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 forced the shutdown of parts of the Colonial Pipeline for several days. It also twice had to suspend services last year due to a leak and a fire. Colonial noted that there are other ways of delivering fuel to limit the disruption to supply, including trucks, barges and other pipelines.
This story (no actual shortage btw) is already causing hovoc here in my AO. Lines around the block at every gas station. Nearest gas station to my house is out...

I have friends in the gas/oil industry and they're all saying this flashmob-like panic is nuts. Some slow deliveries to some areas but no actual limitations to production or supply whatsoever.

So glad I topped off last week... And the wife's diesel Jeep still shows 450+ mile range on 3/4 tank. I'll likely top that off sometime over the weekend when the regular delveries (again, which are in no way impacted) replenish local stocks currently being depleted.
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