How did Venezuela end up this way?

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Aug 08, 2018 12:51 pm

From NPR: Venezuela's Maduro Says Opposition Politicians To Blame For Assassination Attempt
August 8, 2018 4:03 AM ET By Scott Neuman

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro has accused opposition lawmakers of playing a role in a failed attempt to assassinate him over the weekend.

During a nationally televised address to Venezuelan troops on Saturday, Maduro was unhurt when explosives-laden drones exploded near the podium.

In a speech on Tuesday, Maduro said Julio Borges, a prominent opposition leader living in exile in neighboring Colombia, was a co-conspirator in the plot, but he did not elaborate on what role the politician had played.

"Several of the declarations indicated Julio Borges. The investigations point to him," Maduro said.

Another opposition lawmaker, Juan Requesens, was also singled out by Maduro for having been involved in the failed attempt.

A video widely circulated on social media shows Requesens being arrested by Venezuelan police.

Venezuelan law grants lawmakers immunity from prosecution while in office, but the head of the country's pro-Maduro constitutional assembly said he would propose stripping that protection from the two lawmakers.

The Associated Press notes, "Critics of Maduro's socialist government had said immediately after the attack that they feared the unpopular leader would use the incident as an excuse to round up opposition politicians as he seeks to dampen spreading discontent over Venezuela's devastating economic collapse."

As NPR's Colin Dwyer reported earlier, Venezuelan Interior Minister Néstor Luis Reverol announced that six others had been detained in connection with the plot.

Colin writes:
"Reverol says it was a pair of commercial drone aircraft, each carrying about two pounds of C4 explosive material, that bore down on the ceremony. But the drones malfunctioned, he added — one hitting a nearby apartment building, the other crashing after getting disoriented by government jamming signals.

The blasts ended up injuring at least seven troops but left the president, seemingly their intended target, physically unscathed."

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by Stercutus » Wed Aug 08, 2018 1:06 pm

Absolutely, positively not a false flag attack to justify the arrest of lame duck legislators.

In other news smoke was spotted rising from a golden dome building southeast of the Plaza Bolívar.
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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Aug 18, 2018 6:47 am

Venezuelan President Announces New System of Wages and Prices
"We are heading towards normalization, to a country of stability with the Recovery, Growth and Economic Prosperity plan," Nicolas Maduro said.

By TeleSUR English

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro announced that August 20 will be a new bank holiday to ease the transition to the new currency named “Sovereign Bolivar.”

In a Monday press conference, Maduro stated that the country will begin a new economic system of wages and prices rooted in the Petro currency.

“This means a substantial improvement and a better stability of incomes of workers,” he said, “while setting a maximum price of sale for the public, which ought to be respected.”

"Basing Venezuelan salaries on the Petro will stabilize people's buying power; also, there will be stability in product sales. Speculation has ended, which helps all Venezuelans without distinction!" Maduro exclaimed.
“El anclaje del salario del venezolano junto al Petro le dará estabilidad al poder adquisitivo del pueblo; también habrá estabilidad para la venta de bienes ¡Se acabaron las excusas para especular, aquí ganan tod@s l@s venezolan@s sin distingo!” exclamó @NicolasMaduro pic.twitter.com/psiZcZlsuZ
— Prensa Presidencial (@PresidencialVen) 14 de agosto de 2018

“All the institutions linked with the systems of distribution and price” will guarantee “its effectiveness,” explaining that as the prices will be rooted in the Petro, “there won't be any excuse for speculation.”

“Venezuela will have two currencies, one being the Sovereign Bolivar, the other one the Petro. This will introduce a fundamental change,” he stated.

After a meeting with the ministers in the presidential palace, Maduro added that August 20 will become a new bank holiday in order to ease the transition to the new currency named “Sovereign Bolivar.”

According to Maduro, by 2020, “the nation will be able to recover economic and social stability and prosperity.” “We are building a new revolutionary and humanist economic thought, with a new strategic economy for a new economic model. On August 20, a new era will begin,” he added.

"In real time, Venezuelans will know the price of the Sovereign Bolivar and the Petro, made public by the Central Bank. Also, detailed explanations of the salary system and the prices based on the Petro will be forthcoming on August 20. Speculation has ended!" Maduro explained.
"En tiempo real el venezolano sabrá el precio del Bolívar Soberano y El Petro, publicado por el BCV, de igual forma se explicará al detalle a partir del 20 de agosto el sistema salarial y fijación de precios anclados al Petro ¡Se acabó la especulación! apuntó @NicolasMaduro pic.twitter.com/mBCExdLXaD
— Prensa Presidencial (@PresidencialVen) 14 de agosto de 2018

This Telesur article has been edited and adapted by Venezuelanalysis.
'doin the deck chair boogie... :lol:

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by teotwaki » Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:17 pm

Maduro wrote:....“the nation will be able to recover economic and social stability and prosperity.” “We are building a new revolutionary and humanist economic thought, with a new strategic economy for a new economic model. On August 20, a new era will begin,”
Attention! New! New! New!
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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:57 pm

teotwaki wrote:
Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:17 pm
Maduro wrote:....“the nation will be able to recover economic and social stability and prosperity.” “We are building a new revolutionary and humanist economic thought, with a new strategic economy for a new economic model. On August 20, a new era will begin,”
Attention! New! New! New!
Socialism has the technology. Socialism has the capability. Better. Strong. Faster. Maduro can dig Venezuela's grave like never before!

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:52 pm

From Bloomberg: Venezuela Adds to Chaos With One of Biggest Currency Devaluations Ever
By Eduardo Thomson and Fabiola Zerpa ‎August‎ ‎19‎, ‎2018‎ ‎16‎:‎50‎ ‎CDT Updated on ‎August‎ ‎20‎, ‎2018‎ ‎09‎:‎33‎ ‎CDT
Harsh economic measures may test Maduro’s grip on power

Inflation likely to worsen after devaluation, wage increase

Venezuela Devalues Bolivar 95%

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro carried out one of the greatest currency devaluations in history over the weekend -- a 95 percent plunge that will test the capacity of an already beleaguered population to stomach even more pain.

One likely outcome is that inflation, which already was forecast to reach 1 million percent this year, will get fresh fuel from the measures. Prices are currently rising at an annualized rate of 108,000 percent, according to Bloomberg’s Café con Leche index. A massive exodus of Venezuelans fleeing the crisis to neighboring countries will likely increase and with it, tensions and restrictions like the ones seen over the past few days.

The official rate for the currency will go from about 285,000 per dollar to 6 million, a shock that officials tried to partly offset by raising the minimum wage 3,500 percent to the equivalent of just $30 a month. While Maduro boasted in Friday night’s announcement that the International Monetary Fund wasn’t involved in the policies, aspects of the moves bore a resemblance to a classic orthodox economic adjustment, albeit with some confusing twists.

Maduro’s new strategy for managing the economy is a desperate response after years of disastrous policies that undercut growth, sent prices soaring and turned what had once been one of Latin America’s wealthiest countries into a dysfunctional nation that’s spawned a refugee crisis. Pressure is mounting on him to right the ship as calls for his overthrow grow six years after he took over for the late Hugo Chavez. Earlier this month, Maduro started a fresh crackdown on his opponents after a failed attempt to assassinate him using an aerial drone.

The economic shock measures demonstrate the “government’s willingness to do what it takes to stay in power,” Raul Gallegos, an associate director at Control Risks, said from Bogota. “Maduro looks vulnerable, clearly something could happen.”

The streets of Caracas looked mostly empty on Monday morning as Venezuelans continued to digest the news and the impact it will have on their savings. Many shops including supermarkets were closed and some businesses that opened were waiting for more details to adjust prices.
The devaluation comes at the same time the government is redenominating the currency by lopping off five zeros and introducing new bills and a name change. So instead of the new minimum wage being 1.8 million strong bolivars, it will be 1,800 sovereign bolivars. Banks were closed and busy trying to adopt ATMs and online platforms to the new currency rules.

To make things more complicated, the new bolivar’s value will be linked to a crypto currency -- believed to be the first time a government has ever employed the technique. The so-called Petro is backed by crude oil and is valued by the government at $60, or 3,600 sovereign bolivars. The Petro will fluctuate and be used to set prices for goods.

VAT Increase
The value added tax will rise 4 percentage points and officials will end some gasoline subsidies, saving the government $10 billion a year, Maduro said, without providing more details. The central bank will increase the frequency of foreign exchange auctions to three and eventually five days a week.

In some ways, the devaluation is a mere formality. For years now, most people and companies have been unable to access dollars at government-set rates and have been purchasing them in the black market. As a result, the prices on many goods across the country are already based on that exchange rate.

“They had to do this because they ran out of money,” Moises Naim, a fellow at the Carnegie Endowment and a former minister in Venezuela, said from Washington. He pointed out that oil production -- pretty much the country’s sole industry at this point -- has plummeted in recent years amid a shortage of equipment and technical expertise, foreign reserves have plummeted and allies such as China and Russia are providing less support.
Amid the cash crunch, Maduro has halted most payments on Venezuela’s foreign debt and is now $6.1 billion in the hole with bondholders, cutting off most sources of new financing. Creditors are also looking at the country’s assets abroad with an eye toward seizing them. A small Canadian mining company was awarded the right to collect on an arbitration ruling by taking shares held by the parent of U.S. refining unit Citgo, a verdict Venezuela is appealing.

ConocoPhillips announced a $2 billion agreement with state oil company PDVSA on Monday for a decade-long arbitration case over the expropriation of assets. Venezuela will pay $500 million over the next 90 days then settle the rest in quarterly payments over the next four and a half years. As a result Conoco will suspend its actions against PDVSA assets in the Caribbean, according to the statement.
Venezuela’s benchmark bonds due in 2027, which are in default, slid 0.3 cent to 26.7 cents on the dollar. That’s near the lowest since February.

Black Friday
The symbolism of announcing the drastic measures on a Friday night wasn’t lost on many Venezuelans. In 1983, President Luis Herrera Campins devalued the bolivar for the first time in 22 years after oil prices crashed. The day became to be known locally as “Black Friday.”
When in 1989 Venezuela raised gasoline costs, lifted foreign-exchange controls and let the currency plunge, prices soared 21 percent in one month alone, leading to riots known as the “Caracazo” that killed hundreds and eventually paved the way for Chavez’s rise to power.

Military Alliance
It’s not clear how the shock measures announced by Maduro will sit with one of his key allies: the military. Top ranking generals have been handed the keys to ministries, the state-run oil company and the lucrative business of food imports. Myriad exchange rates created juicy arbitrage opportunities that enriched many close associates of the state.

"Clearly this will hit Maduro’s popularity, but power is being sustained with bullets and not with votes," Naim said. "As long as the military continues to have access to lucrative businesses it will continue to grant support to the government."

The opposition, a fragmented group of parties whose leaders are either in hiding or in jail, called for protests against the measures Tuesday. Several labor unions also called for a 24-hour national strike.

Many private companies, already dealing with hyperinflation, years of brain drain, price controls and threats of seizure, now must deal with even faster inflation and mandatory wage hikes. It’s also possible that the exodus of Venezuelans to other countries will increase, even as Ecuador and Peru announced entry restrictions and tensions flared along the border with Brazil.

“People are leaving because of a feeling of despair, and the desperation will now increase,” Naim said.

(Adds activity on streets of Caracas in sixth paragraph.)
I think I was told in one of my 101 classes that devaluation precedes the 'death knell.
Last edited by MPMalloy on Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by absinthe beginner » Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:12 pm

This is what happens when an economy and a society disintegrates due to economic mismanagement and populist folly

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/busi ... 94696.html

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by absinthe beginner » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:01 am

Venezuelans voted for socialism. Now they're getting what they voted for, good and hard.

https://www.businessinsider.com/venezue ... res-2018-8

In a plan designed to tackle hyperinflation, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Friday announced plans to raise his country's minimum wage and create a single exchange rate pegged to his government's petro-backed cryptocurrency, effectively devaluing the country's currency by 96%, Reuters reported.

Venezuelans rushed to shops Friday to stock up on goods before the monetary overhaul — which will remove five zeros from prices — took effect.

Hyperinflation has meant piles of cash are needed to buy basic products. Images

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:25 am

Classic hyperinflation. Nothing new. Did Maduro think that he is immune to basic economic laws?

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:23 pm

From CNBC: Venezuela is pegging its economic recovery to a cryptocurrency that’s widely considered a scam
President Nicolas Maduro announced a new currency going into effect Monday to stop its out-of-control inflation, and it's backed by a cryptocurrency that its own Parliament says is illegal.

Maduro unveiled the oil-backed "petro" digital currency in February to secure cash in an ongoing economic meltdown, and evade financial sanctions imposed by Washington. But that currency does not trade and industry sites have labeled it "scam status."

"This is a smoke and mirrors operation typical of Venezuela — I'll believe it when I see it," says Steve Hanke, professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University.

Kate Rooney | @Kr00ney

Venezuela is doing something completely unprecedented. Some even say illegal.

As part of an attempt to stop skyrocketing inflation, the country is issuing a new fiat currency called the "sovereign bolivar," which will be backed by a cryptocurrency. But that cryptocurrency called the "petro" does not trade, and Venezuela's own parliament says it's being illegally used to mortgage the nation's cash-strapped oil reserves.

"This is a smoke and mirrors operation typical of Venezuela — I'll believe it when I see it," said Steve Hanke, professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University and one of the world's leading experts on hyperinflation. "The problem with the petro is it's a scam, it doesn't even trade.

In February, President Nicolas Maduro unveiled the oil-backed "petro" digital currency as a means to raise cash amidst an ongoing economic meltdown and economic sanctions. Maduro said each petro token, which are not in circulation yet, would be backed by a barrel of the state's national petroleum. He also said about 100 million petro tokens would be issued — estimated to be worth around $6 billion.

Crypto rating site ICOindex.com, which rates initial coin offerings, labeled the petro "scam status." The site evaluates coins based on their white papers, and said while petro promised to be backed up by oil resources, "the technology and mechanisms to do so are not adequately explained." Another site, ICObench, gives it a 1.6 out of 5 stars.

There's no evidence backing Maduro's claim on Twitter to have raised $735 million in an initial coin offering. Venezeula opposition-led parliament called the cryptocurrency's sale as "unconstitutional" and way to illegally mortgage the country's oil reserves.

Maduro has said he's aiming to peg wages, prices and pensions to the petro, which he said would equal $60 or 3,600 sovereign bolivars. The end goal, he said, is a single floating exchange rate in the future tied to the digital currency.

In March, President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning any transactions within the United States involving any digital currency issued by, for, or on behalf of the Government of Venezuela.

Venezuela's banks closed Monday in preparation to release the sovereign bolivar bills, which will have five fewer zeros than the current bolivar currency. The launch of a new fiat currency is at the center of Maduro's strategy to stem hyperinflation, which the International Monetary Fund predicted would jump to 1 million percent by the end of the year. The IMF also forecasted an 18 percent shrink in the economy as oil production falls significantly.

Hanke, also a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, said essentially all Venezuela doing is exchanging 100,000 old bolivars for one new bolivar which won't make "any difference whatsoever" towards stopping an inflation rate that has exceeded 40,000 percent.

"They're not changing policy in any way nothing will change," Hanke said. "All things will revert back to the course they were on before this so-called currency changed."

On Friday, Maduro announced a 3,000 percent hike in the minimum wage, along with the new currency that kick in Monday. Opposition leaders called for a nationwide strike and protest this week in hopes to draw masses into the streets against Maduro's socialist ruling party.

The country has been in turmoil since Maduro took office in 2013. Caracas' financial transactions have been crippled by Western sanctions, and citizens are coping with widespread food shortages as their traditional currency collapses.

Cryptocurrency uses encryption to verify the transfer of funds, and operates independently of a third party like a central bank. The first, and best-known example is bitcoin, which skyrocketed to almost $20,000 last year. Since then, it's lost more than 60 percent of its value, according to data from CoinDesk.

— The Associated Press contributed to this report. Kate Rooney-Markets Reporter

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Aug 25, 2018 8:39 am

From MSN: Venezuelan migrants pour into Peru before new rules enforced
AGUAS VERDES, Peru — Thousands of Venezuelans fleeing their nation's economic and humanitarian crisis rushed to reach Peru on Friday before stiffer new rules go into effect that will make entering the fellow South American nation more difficult.

Tired men, women and children, many lugging their belongings in suitcases, lined up at the Peru-Ecuador border to pass through migration authorities before Saturday, when Venezuelans will be required to present a passport to enter Peru.

Peru's new measure follows in the footsteps of other nations that have been swamped with hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans. Authorities say the measure is necessary to know who is entering the country and what happens to them, but critics and rights groups warn it will only lead migrants to take more dangerous routes.

While Peru doesn't share a border with Venezuela, many migrants try to reach it by going through Ecuador or Colombia, believing they will have a better shot at finding a job or obtaining legal status.

Obtaining a passport has becoming increasingly difficult in Venezuela, where hyperinflation is expected to reach 1 million percent by the end of this year and there are shortages of basic supplies like paper and ink.

"We are being very open but we need a correct identification," said Interior Minister Mauro Medina, as he rolled out a new digital fingerprint system that also is being put in place. "It's important for whatever might happen in the future."

The United Nations estimates 2.3 million Venezuelans have fled since 2014 as the country with the world's largest proven oil reserves plummets into an economic crisis worse than the Great Depression. Most are now leaving by land through Colombia, where more than 1 million have arrived in the last two years. Authorities in Ecuador say there are about 200,000 Venezuelans now living in the country, while in Peru the number has rapidly climbed to over 400,000.

Peru's economy is expected to grow by 4 percent this year and many Venezuelans already have at least one relative living in the nation. Some 73,000 Venezuelans have been given a temporary legal status allowing them to live and work in the country while another 108,000 have applied.

Former President Pedro Pablo Kukzynski, who resigned from office amid a corruption scandal earlier this year, was also one of the region's most outspoken leaders in decrying Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro for human rights abuses and for pushing through the creation of a powerful new pro-government assembly to overrule an opposition-dominated legislature.

In major cities like Lima, it's now not uncommon to see Venezuelans selling coffee or playing tropical music along the side of the road.
"We are so grateful for the love we've received," said Carlos Rodriguez, a Venezuelan migrant entering Peru on Friday.

The stricter entry requirements come a week after a similar measure by Ecuador, which began requiring Venezuelans to present a passport. Colombia also requires Venezuelans to have a passport or a special border card in order to enter, but many enter by skirting border posts, so the new Peruvian and Ecuadoran rules leave those people trapped in Colombia.

Criticism by migrant and refugee rights groups of the new measures is mounting. The United Nations this week called on both Peru and Ecuador to ease restrictions, and late Friday a judge in Ecuador temporarily suspended the passport requirement while ordering the government to come up with a plan to absorb the flow of migrants.

Colombia officials said requiring a passport could separate families trying to reunite abroad and create a bottleneck of migrants no longer able to pass through checkpoints.

"Requiring passports from a nation that doesn't have them and whose government doesn't facilitate issuing them only fuels irregularity," said Christian Kruger, the head of Colombia's migration agency. "We should seek shared means of ensuring a migration that is identifiable, orderly and safe in the region."

Immigration officials from Colombia, Ecuador and Peru are expected to gather in Bogota next week in hopes of developing a regional response.
Tensions over the huge inflows of migrants have been steadily surfacing throughout the region. Many are arriving in poor communities with already high levels of unemployment and are willing to work for less than the minimum wage.

In Brazil, angry residents roamed through the border town of Paracaima earlier this month hurling rocks at Venezuelans and setting fire to their belongings after four migrants were blamed with robbing and stabbing a local storeowner.

In Peru, Lima mayoral candidate Ricardo Belmont recently told a local television station, without providing any evidence, that of those Venezuelan migrants arriving, "only 30 percent are magnificent people."

While the vast majority of migrants choose to stay despite the xenophobia they encounter, some do occasionally return home. Peru's foreign ministry said Friday that about 100 Venezuelans would be voluntarily going back to their homeland next week on an airplane financed by Venezuela's government.
___
Associated Press writers Franklin Briceno in Lima, Peru, and Christine Armario in Bogota, Colombia, contributed to this report.

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:23 am

From NPR: Brazil Sends Military To Border To Cope With Flood Of Fleeing Venezuelans
Venezula's neighbors are tightening up restriction on refugees & migrants.

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by Stercutus » Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:48 am

MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:23 am
From NPR: Brazil Sends Military To Border To Cope With Flood Of Fleeing Venezuelans
Venezula's neighbors are tightening up restriction on refugees & migrants.
Wait wut? How dare they secure their borders. That is just crazy pants.
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by Mrselfdestruct » Mon Sep 03, 2018 4:32 pm

Real question is what the heelll did they think was going to happen?
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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by LowKey » Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:52 am

Stercutus wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:48 am
MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:23 am
From NPR: Brazil Sends Military To Border To Cope With Flood Of Fleeing Venezuelans
Venezula's neighbors are tightening up restriction on refugees & migrants.
Wait wut? How dare they secure their borders. That is just crazy pants.
I didn't know Brazil was racist.
“Political tags – such as royalist, communist, democrat, populist, fascist, liberal, conservative, and so forth – are never basic criteria. The human race divides politically into those who want people to be controlled and those who have no such desire.” Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Sep 04, 2018 8:38 am

LowKey wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:52 am
Stercutus wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:48 am
MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:23 am
From NPR: Brazil Sends Military To Border To Cope With Flood Of Fleeing Venezuelans Venezula's neighbors are tightening up restriction on refugees & migrants.
Wait wut? How dare they secure their borders. That is just crazy pants.
I didn't know Brazil was racist.
It would be wrong to allow only one race/color/creed of human beings to be racist. :clownshoes:

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by Stercutus » Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:04 am

MPMalloy wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 8:38 am
LowKey wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:52 am
Stercutus wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:48 am
MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:23 am
From NPR: Brazil Sends Military To Border To Cope With Flood Of Fleeing Venezuelans Venezula's neighbors are tightening up restriction on refugees & migrants.
Wait wut? How dare they secure their borders. That is just crazy pants.
I didn't know Brazil was racist.
It would be wrong to allow only one race/color/creed of human beings to be racist. :clownshoes:
I am redefining racism to mean whatever I am not, and only other people. So there.
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:52 am

I came across this PBS video on YT: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbZqkIeFS54

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sun Sep 09, 2018 1:22 pm

From CNBC: Trump administration reportedly courting dissident Venezuelan military officers to potentially oust Maduro
The Trump administration has held clandestine talks with rebellious military officers from Venezuela, The New York Times reported on Saturday.

Those conversations suggest the U.S. is seeking to foment an overthrow of President Nicolas Maduro's government, or support elements within the country that will.
This sounds familiar.... :?

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:46 am

From NPR: For Many In Venezuela, Social Media Is A Matter Of Life And Death
Guillermo does not exist — on social media at least. He has a Facebook account, but he doesn't publicly use his real name. He doesn't have a profile picture, doesn't show his location, and never posts a single thing. He mostly logs in to read about sports.

Guillermo asked that his last name be withheld — he worries about his family. They still live in Venezuela. Amid political and economic chaos, over a million Venezuelans have left the country in the last two years.

Guillermo, who lives in New York, worries that if he posts anything indicating he might have money, "someone I know, or who knows my family, could kidnap them. Just because of a picture. Because they might think that I can pay a ransom of thousands of dollars."

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 19, 2018 6:35 am

From ABC (Australia): Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro slammed for lavish Salt Bae dinner as country starves
US senator Marco Rubio has led a chorus of outrage after footage emerged of Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro enjoying a lavish dinner served by Turkish internet sensation "Salt Bae", while many in his country struggle to put food on the table.

Nusret Gokce, the chef who went viral because of the way he flamboyantly plates up his salted meat dishes, earning the moniker Salt Bae, posted three videos to his Instagram account on Monday (local time) of Mr Maduro dining at his Istanbul restaurant.

According to a UN report published last week, more than 3.7 million Venezuelans, or 12 per cent of the population, are undernourished.

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by Evan the Diplomat » Wed Sep 19, 2018 9:45 am

MPMalloy wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 6:35 am
From ABC (Australia): Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro slammed for lavish Salt Bae dinner as country starves
US senator Marco Rubio has led a chorus of outrage after footage emerged of Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro enjoying a lavish dinner served by Turkish internet sensation "Salt Bae", while many in his country struggle to put food on the table.

Nusret Gokce, the chef who went viral because of the way he flamboyantly plates up his salted meat dishes, earning the moniker Salt Bae, posted three videos to his Instagram account on Monday (local time) of Mr Maduro dining at his Istanbul restaurant.

According to a UN report published last week, more than 3.7 million Venezuelans, or 12 per cent of the population, are undernourished.
My favorite bus driver, Nicolas Podrido.

OBTW although this is rather late, I think it is worth mentioning that I heard a radio report either from the BBC or NPR describing that Venezuelans crossing into cuckoo talk trying to make their way to Bogotá were carrying their belongings in the rollaway suitcases which those wheels quickly disintegrated (Venezuela is not a backpacking culture)and were thinking it would be 8 to 10 days walk when actually it is closer to 30.

In addition, and this is worth noting for those of us planning bug out on foot in the United States, they did not count on the change in altitude and Meny were suffering hypothermia as they had to go up into the Andes during their trek Bogotá.
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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by teotwaki » Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:14 pm

Bogota is a long way from the border! Wow.

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related stories

https://www.euronews.com/2018/03/26/col ... ant-influx

Up to 45,000 migrants cross on foot from Venezuela to Cúcuta every day (Note only 4,000 remain each day). The Colombian city has become the last hope for many fleeing Venezuela’s crumbling economy. Already four million people, out of a population of 30 million, have fled Venezuela due to chronic shortages of food and medicine.

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/28/60671649 ... d-colombia

There was a study that came out a couple months ago that found that over half of Venezuelans report losing weight in the last year with an average loss of 20 pounds. People are dying of treatable diseases because of a lack of medication.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpic ... 41754.html

The assessment also found evidence of significant family separation, recruitment of children into gangs and armed groups, sexual violence and exploitation, including transactional sex of Venezuelan women, girls and boys, and due to the lack of education opportunities, more children living and working on the streets.

"Venezuelans who remain in Colombia invariably have few possessions, very little or no money, and no immediate, formal and safe opportunities to earn income," Garcia said.
My adventures and pictures are on my blog http://suntothenorth.blogspot.com

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Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Wed Sep 19, 2018 6:07 pm

How many times does Madureo have to say "Hola a todos! Ver esto!" before we believe him?
From CNBC: Former Obama chief of staff Rahm Emanuel warns Trump may order military action in Venezuela for political gain
As Nicolas Maduro's Venezuela keeps descending into lawlessness and chaos, President Donald Trump has publicly entertained the possibility of military intervention. So far, he hasn't acted.

But now Trump faces mounting legal and political pressures approaching midterm elections that could make his problems worse. And Rahm Emanuel, the former top aide to President Barack Obama who is now Chicago's mayor, is publicly warning that the mercurial commander-in-chief may blow past the hesitation of national security advisors in search of a rally-around-the-flag political boost. He wants Congress to flash caution lights.

"We have a phrase in this country: the October surprise," Emanuel, Obama's first White House chief of staff, told me in an interview. "I think in this situation he is looking to do anything and will do anything.

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