How did Venezuela end up this way?

Stuff that’s happening in the world that may pertain to our survival. Please keep political debates off the forum.

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Apr 30, 2019 11:21 am

This is all over my news channels along with paywalls. :(
Also, this may & may not be "it".

Guaido appears to have support from a few members of the Armed Forces. There was a brief exchange of gunfire.

Developing story, usual boilerplate.

MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:34 pm

Both links are from AP:

Story 1
Story 2

Thing seem to be heating up, who knows.

ETA: It sounds like Bloomberg, Reuters, & the AP are calling it.

YMMV.

absinthe beginner
* * * * *
Posts: 1256
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:05 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shawn of the Dead
Location: Colorado

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by absinthe beginner » Wed May 01, 2019 12:03 pm

Pompeo threatening U.S. military intervention.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05- ... mpted-coup

User avatar
moab
* * * * *
Posts: 3496
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:07 pm

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by moab » Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm

Plagaboy - I've read several US special Forces troops commenting on this yesterday and today. Saying that the country outlawed firearms some time ago. And that this is what happens when you take away citizens guns. You end up getting run over by your own militaries vehicles. Any truth to the gun confiscation? What are your thoughts on that?

This is fascinating to hear from a person on the ground. Do you live in a rural or city area? Are you still training to be a dentist? How has that been affected by the power and such? I would assume greatly.

As you describe the overtaking of just about everything by criminals. It follows the story of Selco in the Balkans. During that struggle. The criminals slowly took everything over. And every trade took on a nightmarish tone. And then beyond that where you could get killed very easily just trying to trade with people outside of your circle.

Hopefully the international community will respond to alleviate some of this. Even food aid would improve things I would think.

Keep up the on the ground reporting if you can. It's important. And we "are" listening. Brave of you to do so.

Last question. At what point would you leave the country? How bad would it have to get? Selco's stated big mistake was not getting out faster. At least to the countryside. Where you could fend for yourself to some degree. His time in the city was terrible to say the least. If you've never read any of his stuff you might take a look at it. Might not be unwise to follow some of his teachings at this critical juncture in your country. It's a bit expensive like $79. But he has a course on what your actually going thru. And there is still time to put in place some of his strategies. Meeting points, hidden communication, weapons, teamwork, storing caches, strategies for trading, supplies that matter - the list goes on.

His writings are here. https://shtfschool.com/ They are very sobering. A Lot of his writing is simply recounting what he and his family and city went through. And how they survived. I'm a pretty pessimistic former US MArine. And even I took a lot away from his writings. COuld be more specific in it's instructions. But you get the main ideas of what you need to survive. And can do further research on those subjects elsewhere on the net. Especially things like secure communications between people you trust. Especially after the power goes out. Lists of fall back points and places to meet with the rest of your group.

Do you have a group that can help each other? Large family, friends associates? Your in a good position as a dentist. That's one profession people will need around. And less likely to get killed for it. I mean it's not like your carrying 50lbs of ammo or something. Your skills could keep you and your family alive. If this gets worse.

I think if the power goes out it's going to go downhill fast. Our thoughts are with you. Good luck. And I hope you're surviving.

Lastly, do you have a bug out strategy? Bug out bags? Vehicle? Plan to evacuate if need be?
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

plagaboy
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2019 8:06 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Dawn of the Dead, 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later, Shawn of the Dead, Zombieland.
Location: Venezuela

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by plagaboy » Tue May 07, 2019 2:02 pm

Hi guys, sorry for the absence but things have been getting a bit chaotic in here in the last weeks.

(Not So) Quick Update -

- The power outages are daily in the interior, Caracas is the only city in the country with an almost normal service, from what I've heard some 2-3 cuts a week and nowhere near as long as we get. Where I live it's either one 6 hours straight cut or up to 16 hours 2-3 hour cuts, people adapts quickly, but it is exhausting as hell. From what I've heard from some friends that have managed to communicate with another one that lives in Zulia state, the situation there is a living hell, the most privileged zones can get to 8 hours of power daily maybe more, others have 2-3 days straight without power.

- The April 30th "event" was something - weird- is the best way I can describe it. Nobody knew nothing, everybody wanted everything to happen and the ones that did it, neither said nor managed to do anything relevant with it. Some small arms skirmishes here and there, the one at the "La Carlota" airport being the most relevant (the pic of the soldier with the AFAG - the venezuelan m240 equivalent - and the crates of ammo and bananas was taken from a near overpass), at the end of it all, there was only a couple more of innocent people fighting for a change getting killed and more damages to the already worn down infrastructure of the country just to see which socialist gets to decide how much more commie its gonna get the country.

- May 1st was officially decreed the usual min-wage raise, but as it was nowhere near people was expecting it was swept under the rug and no gov official has addressed it AFAIK. It went from 18.000 Bs. to 65.000 Bs (this is including food stamps which are mandatory to everyone and started being deposited with the actual wage some years ago since the traditional little stamp books became to expensive - a little fact that fails to be brought up in international mainstream media). Food went incredibly expensive before, a 36 carton of eggs went from 10.000 to 30.000 Bs in a week and it's still going up, meat and chicken are getting ridiculous.

- If anyone have any doubts about criminals in the armed forces, yes, there are a lot in the institution. Enlisted troops backgrounds are not being checked thoroughly, psych evaluations are not being conducted and if they even know about something sketchy, the turnout of volunteers is so low that they accept almost anything, so is no uncommon to have troops that are criminals and go to serve to escape beefs with other criminals or just to do something else because they are bored. I've had under my command a kid who got in jail after killing someone in a robery gone south, managed to get out and returned to base 3 months later and let in no questions asked thankfully it deserted in his next leave, 2 drug addicts, 1 thief, 1 deserter, and 1 sociopath that to be honest, scared the crap out of me. I've heard that in the GNB things are a lot worst.
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm

Plagaboy - I've read several US special Forces troops commenting on this yesterday and today. Saying that the country outlawed firearms some time ago. And that this is what happens when you take away citizens guns. You end up getting run over by your own militaries vehicles. Any truth to the gun confiscation? What are your thoughts on that?
You just brought up one of the main reasons for me to argue with almost anyone in this country, and let me start my response (I'll try to be as concise as possible) with saying that the 2A is one of the main reasons I've always admired the US and hoped to maybe move there at some point in my life. The fact that your Founding Fathers managed to predict that at some point a government CAN and WILL - if allowed to - turn tyrannical, in a moment of such hope and high expectations as it is the birth of their nation, amazes me incredibly.

For starters, Venezuela had a really outdated and a bit restrictive firearms law in the time that Chavez came to power, it required psychological, medical, theoretical and practical examination and registration, backgrounds check and that for a sports permit, for carry it was a bit more in depth and needed a reason to apply signed by a LEO agency. If you managed to go to all of those hurdles then you could buy your non-military caliber firearm, with an exemption made to 9mm, as well as semi auto long guns being highly restricted.

So, when Chavez came into power there was a bipartisan move to further restrict the sales and ownership of firearms by civilians, my fellow countrymen being really moved and touched by the governments preoccupation in our security, massively approved of this measure. So then it came a 1st wave of confiscation, witch led to leave firearms in the hands of mostly LEO/MIL, well connected, rich & pro gov people and obviously, criminals.

However that didnt made the murder rates drop, to the surprise of the vast majority of the population; so then it came a 2nd wave that also took sub guns and rifles from police (as disagreement from some police forces began to rise, some where also disbanded/reformed and others more aligned created), again, the people highly supported this move, and then we get to recent times, in the first half of the decade there was a move that took out almost every gunshop in the country, if not all of them, and the increasing corruption made almost impossible to buy a weapon, with some stories of firearms getting lost in the process of expertise and registration if someone like it to much, it was reported as a stolen/crime implicated gun, even if it was factory new. LEO/MIL getting killed for their guns, civilians with permits being targeted at higher rates and being sold off by the LEO that managed the permits.

So to summarize, yes there was a gun confiscation, highly acclaimed by the population that stills can't manage to see that it was never a security problem but rather a control problem, and to make matters worst they continue to back these insane gun laws, even when 2 minutes after you can hear them wishing they have a way to protect themselves from armed thugs, whether gov or criminals. :roll:
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm
This is fascinating to hear from a person on the ground. Do you live in a rural or city area? Are you still training to be a dentist? How has that been affected by the power and such? I would assume greatly.
I live in a big town/small city at the center of the country, 2hr from Caracas, the same for Valencia, which are the 1st & 3rd most important cities in the country and like 1hr from Maracay, the 8th. But it's really quiet and near enough to the center of the country to get almost any good and not be insanely overpriced, being in rural areas is not so peachy right now due to criminal bands that use them from everything the see fit and near the borders being controlled by guerrillas, so I rather stay here for the moment.

I finished college 7 years ago, and entered the army 2 years ago; while practicing in the civilian world I made fairly well, but after entering the army I'm almost broke and now I can't work due to a back injury that requires a 2nd surgery (my first one was 10 years ago), so in the meantime I'm getting a fair amount of help from my father, from what my best friend in college says, things are incredibly rough, when there's actually power to work, most patient find the prices a bit restrictive when food is so expensive, and then you have to take into account other expenses, so right now they seek treatment mainly in a - really need to - basis. Of course I would be doing much much more better than as an army lieutenant. Contrary to popular belief an officer doesn't get paid a fortune, just 1 1/2 minimum wages.
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm
As you describe the overtaking of just about everything by criminals. It follows the story of Selco in the Balkans. During that struggle. The criminals slowly took everything over. And every trade took on a nightmarish tone. And then beyond that where you could get killed very easily just trying to trade with people outside of your circle.

Hopefully the international community will respond to alleviate some of this. Even food aid would improve things I would think.

Keep up the on the ground reporting if you can. It's important. And we "are" listening. Brave of you to do so.
There's not much more I can say about this, you can find corruption and links to organized crime in almost every facet of life, but in a turn for the better, kidnapping is not such a big issue now, as most people doesn't have enough money to pay for the ransom, they turned to other sources o income, like luring people trying to exchange US$; of course, the amount of people that got killed and the stories that came because of this, was enough to make you lose hope on humanity, I particularly recall one here in my hometown of a guy getting his wife and 3mo baby girl just because he said to the carjacker to take the truck because he didn't have any money to recover it, so the POS fired to them just to take something that he truly cared for and leaved him with the truck.

Some aid came in with the approval of the government (I don't wan't to think what the opposition traded for it), and that same week some products found their way to the black market, this country is doomed because it's people don't even care about themselves anymore.
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm
Last question. At what point would you leave the country? How bad would it have to get? Selco's stated big mistake was not getting out faster. At least to the countryside. Where you could fend for yourself to some degree. His time in the city was terrible to say the least. If you've never read any of his stuff you might take a look at it. Might not be unwise to follow some of his teachings at this critical juncture in your country. It's a bit expensive like $79. But he has a course on what your actually going thru. And there is still time to put in place some of his strategies. Meeting points, hidden communication, weapons, teamwork, storing caches, strategies for trading, supplies that matter - the list goes on.

His writings are here. https://shtfschool.com/ They are very sobering. A Lot of his writing is simply recounting what he and his family and city went through. And how they survived. I'm a pretty pessimistic former US MArine. And even I took a lot away from his writings. COuld be more specific in it's instructions. But you get the main ideas of what you need to survive. And can do further research on those subjects elsewhere on the net. Especially things like secure communications between people you trust. Especially after the power goes out. Lists of fall back points and places to meet with the rest of your group.

Do you have a group that can help each other? Large family, friends associates? Your in a good position as a dentist. That's one profession people will need around. And less likely to get killed for it. I mean it's not like your carrying 50lbs of ammo or something. Your skills could keep you and your family alive. If this gets worse.

I think if the power goes out it's going to go downhill fast. Our thoughts are with you. Good luck. And I hope you're surviving.

Lastly, do you have a bug out strategy? Bug out bags? Vehicle? Plan to evacuate if need be?
At this point I'm just waiting for my surgery, then my discharge from the army to get out of here, I've tried everything that I can and did all that I could, time to move on and continue. Hopefully I'll get out this year, my main worry would by my parents and close family that won't get out of here so I'll worry about that when the time comes.

I think I've read some of his stuff or at least another Balkans survivor, In my opinion this situation has gotten a bit more complex given the drug/terrorism/geopolitical problems that have surfaced, besides the plain depravity and viciousness of the common criminal; of course we are not in an all out collapse like he describes - yet -, but I'm afraid that in the moment we reach it, it will be far more worst.

I had plans and stuff, but this situation has been for so long that everything has changed, right now my main concern in any given unrest event is to be available on the cellphone, due to being active duty mil for the time being; then get home, then comms with everyone else, after those 3 steps have been taken care off I can evaluate the situation and plan my next move. My EDC bag is my main BOB as for I can manage to live at least 4 days out of it in urban -not-so-permissive- environments, in case I need anything bigger, I do have a 65lts camping bag and all the usual survival BS. I've managed to get in and out of harms ways mainly by being extremely mobile, recognizing threats and being able to bullshit my way out of some crappy situations. While a 30lbs TAD EDC BOB might be extremely cool and sexy to show off on youtube, in a civil unrest event in urban environments mobility is always my main concern, security will come with movement and situational awareness and being able to not only blend in but to be dismissed either by presenting a hard target bluff or by appearing to be a not valuable target.

I really appreciate your concern and to be willing to read my TL;DR walls of text about the situation, and excuse me If don't get my point across sometimes, but English is not my native language, none the less, if you have any doubt or question, I'll try to answer to the best of my abilities. :awesome:

User avatar
moab
* * * * *
Posts: 3496
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:07 pm

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by moab » Tue May 07, 2019 2:27 pm

plagaboy wrote:
Tue May 07, 2019 2:02 pm
Hi guys, sorry for the absence but things have been getting a bit chaotic in here in the last weeks.

(Not So) Quick Update -

- The power outages are daily in the interior, Caracas is the only city in the country with an almost normal service, from what I've heard some 2-3 cuts a week and nowhere near as long as we get. Where I live it's either one 6 hours straight cut or up to 16 hours 2-3 hour cuts, people adapts quickly, but it is exhausting as hell. From what I've heard from some friends that have managed to communicate with another one that lives in Zulia state, the situation there is a living hell, the most privileged zones can get to 8 hours of power daily maybe more, others have 2-3 days straight without power.

- The April 30th "event" was something - weird- is the best way I can describe it. Nobody knew nothing, everybody wanted everything to happen and the ones that did it, neither said nor managed to do anything relevant with it. Some small arms skirmishes here and there, the one at the "La Carlota" airport being the most relevant (the pic of the soldier with the AFAG - the venezuelan m240 equivalent - and the crates of ammo and bananas was taken from a near overpass), at the end of it all, there was only a couple more of innocent people fighting for a change getting killed and more damages to the already worn down infrastructure of the country just to see which socialist gets to decide how much more commie its gonna get the country.

- May 1st was officially decreed the usual min-wage raise, but as it was nowhere near people was expecting it was swept under the rug and no gov official has addressed it AFAIK. It went from 18.000 Bs. to 65.000 Bs (this is including food stamps which are mandatory to everyone and started being deposited with the actual wage some years ago since the traditional little stamp books became to expensive - a little fact that fails to be brought up in international mainstream media). Food went incredibly expensive before, a 36 carton of eggs went from 10.000 to 30.000 Bs in a week and it's still going up, meat and chicken are getting ridiculous.

- If anyone have any doubts about criminals in the armed forces, yes, there are a lot in the institution. Enlisted troops backgrounds are not being checked thoroughly, psych evaluations are not being conducted and if they even know about something sketchy, the turnout of volunteers is so low that they accept almost anything, so is no uncommon to have troops that are criminals and go to serve to escape beefs with other criminals or just to do something else because they are bored. I've had under my command a kid who got in jail after killing someone in a robery gone south, managed to get out and returned to base 3 months later and let in no questions asked thankfully it deserted in his next leave, 2 drug addicts, 1 thief, 1 deserter, and 1 sociopath that to be honest, scared the crap out of me. I've heard that in the GNB things are a lot worst.
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm

Plagaboy - I've read several US special Forces troops commenting on this yesterday and today. Saying that the country outlawed firearms some time ago. And that this is what happens when you take away citizens guns. You end up getting run over by your own militaries vehicles. Any truth to the gun confiscation? What are your thoughts on that?
You just brought up one of the main reasons for me to argue with almost anyone in this country, and let me start my response (I'll try to be as concise as possible) with saying that the 2A is one of the main reasons I've always admired the US and hoped to maybe move there at some point in my life. The fact that your Founding Fathers managed to predict that at some point a government CAN and WILL - if allowed to - turn tyrannical, in a moment of such hope and high expectations as it is the birth of their nation, amazes me incredibly.

For starters, Venezuela had a really outdated and a bit restrictive firearms law in the time that Chavez came to power, it required psychological, medical, theoretical and practical examination and registration, backgrounds check and that for a sports permit, for carry it was a bit more in depth and needed a reason to apply signed by a LEO agency. If you managed to go to all of those hurdles then you could buy your non-military caliber firearm, with an exemption made to 9mm, as well as semi auto long guns being highly restricted.

So, when Chavez came into power there was a bipartisan move to further restrict the sales and ownership of firearms by civilians, my fellow countrymen being really moved and touched by the governments preoccupation in our security, massively approved of this measure. So then it came a 1st wave of confiscation, witch led to leave firearms in the hands of mostly LEO/MIL, well connected, rich & pro gov people and obviously, criminals.

However that didnt made the murder rates drop, to the surprise of the vast majority of the population; so then it came a 2nd wave that also took sub guns and rifles from police (as disagreement from some police forces began to rise, some where also disbanded/reformed and others more aligned created), again, the people highly supported this move, and then we get to recent times, in the first half of the decade there was a move that took out almost every gunshop in the country, if not all of them, and the increasing corruption made almost impossible to buy a weapon, with some stories of firearms getting lost in the process of expertise and registration if someone like it to much, it was reported as a stolen/crime implicated gun, even if it was factory new. LEO/MIL getting killed for their guns, civilians with permits being targeted at higher rates and being sold off by the LEO that managed the permits.

So to summarize, yes there was a gun confiscation, highly acclaimed by the population that stills can't manage to see that it was never a security problem but rather a control problem, and to make matters worst they continue to back these insane gun laws, even when 2 minutes after you can hear them wishing they have a way to protect themselves from armed thugs, whether gov or criminals. :roll:
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm
This is fascinating to hear from a person on the ground. Do you live in a rural or city area? Are you still training to be a dentist? How has that been affected by the power and such? I would assume greatly.
I live in a big town/small city at the center of the country, 2hr from Caracas, the same for Valencia, which are the 1st & 3rd most important cities in the country and like 1hr from Maracay, the 8th. But it's really quiet and near enough to the center of the country to get almost any good and not be insanely overpriced, being in rural areas is not so peachy right now due to criminal bands that use them from everything the see fit and near the borders being controlled by guerrillas, so I rather stay here for the moment.

I finished college 7 years ago, and entered the army 2 years ago; while practicing in the civilian world I made fairly well, but after entering the army I'm almost broke and now I can't work due to a back injury that requires a 2nd surgery (my first one was 10 years ago), so in the meantime I'm getting a fair amount of help from my father, from what my best friend in college says, things are incredibly rough, when there's actually power to work, most patient find the prices a bit restrictive when food is so expensive, and then you have to take into account other expenses, so right now they seek treatment mainly in a - really need to - basis. Of course I would be doing much much more better than as an army lieutenant. Contrary to popular belief an officer doesn't get paid a fortune, just 1 1/2 minimum wages.
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm
As you describe the overtaking of just about everything by criminals. It follows the story of Selco in the Balkans. During that struggle. The criminals slowly took everything over. And every trade took on a nightmarish tone. And then beyond that where you could get killed very easily just trying to trade with people outside of your circle.

Hopefully the international community will respond to alleviate some of this. Even food aid would improve things I would think.

Keep up the on the ground reporting if you can. It's important. And we "are" listening. Brave of you to do so.
There's not much more I can say about this, you can find corruption and links to organized crime in almost every facet of life, but in a turn for the better, kidnapping is not such a big issue now, as most people doesn't have enough money to pay for the ransom, they turned to other sources o income, like luring people trying to exchange US$; of course, the amount of people that got killed and the stories that came because of this, was enough to make you lose hope on humanity, I particularly recall one here in my hometown of a guy getting his wife and 3mo baby girl just because he said to the carjacker to take the truck because he didn't have any money to recover it, so the POS fired to them just to take something that he truly cared for and leaved him with the truck.

Some aid came in with the approval of the government (I don't wan't to think what the opposition traded for it), and that same week some products found their way to the black market, this country is doomed because it's people don't even care about themselves anymore.
moab wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 4:11 pm
Last question. At what point would you leave the country? How bad would it have to get? Selco's stated big mistake was not getting out faster. At least to the countryside. Where you could fend for yourself to some degree. His time in the city was terrible to say the least. If you've never read any of his stuff you might take a look at it. Might not be unwise to follow some of his teachings at this critical juncture in your country. It's a bit expensive like $79. But he has a course on what your actually going thru. And there is still time to put in place some of his strategies. Meeting points, hidden communication, weapons, teamwork, storing caches, strategies for trading, supplies that matter - the list goes on.

His writings are here. https://shtfschool.com/ They are very sobering. A Lot of his writing is simply recounting what he and his family and city went through. And how they survived. I'm a pretty pessimistic former US MArine. And even I took a lot away from his writings. COuld be more specific in it's instructions. But you get the main ideas of what you need to survive. And can do further research on those subjects elsewhere on the net. Especially things like secure communications between people you trust. Especially after the power goes out. Lists of fall back points and places to meet with the rest of your group.

Do you have a group that can help each other? Large family, friends associates? Your in a good position as a dentist. That's one profession people will need around. And less likely to get killed for it. I mean it's not like your carrying 50lbs of ammo or something. Your skills could keep you and your family alive. If this gets worse.

I think if the power goes out it's going to go downhill fast. Our thoughts are with you. Good luck. And I hope you're surviving.

Lastly, do you have a bug out strategy? Bug out bags? Vehicle? Plan to evacuate if need be?
At this point I'm just waiting for my surgery, then my discharge from the army to get out of here, I've tried everything that I can and did all that I could, time to move on and continue. Hopefully I'll get out this year, my main worry would by my parents and close family that won't get out of here so I'll worry about that when the time comes.

I think I've read some of his stuff or at least another Balkans survivor, In my opinion this situation has gotten a bit more complex given the drug/terrorism/geopolitical problems that have surfaced, besides the plain depravity and viciousness of the common criminal; of course we are not in an all out collapse like he describes - yet -, but I'm afraid that in the moment we reach it, it will be far more worst.

I had plans and stuff, but this situation has been for so long that everything has changed, right now my main concern in any given unrest event is to be available on the cellphone, due to being active duty mil for the time being; then get home, then comms with everyone else, after those 3 steps have been taken care off I can evaluate the situation and plan my next move. My EDC bag is my main BOB as for I can manage to live at least 4 days out of it in urban -not-so-permissive- environments, in case I need anything bigger, I do have a 65lts camping bag and all the usual survival BS. I've managed to get in and out of harms ways mainly by being extremely mobile, recognizing threats and being able to bullshit my way out of some crappy situations. While a 30lbs TAD EDC BOB might be extremely cool and sexy to show off on youtube, in a civil unrest event in urban environments mobility is always my main concern, security will come with movement and situational awareness and being able to not only blend in but to be dismissed either by presenting a hard target bluff or by appearing to be a not valuable target.

I really appreciate your concern and to be willing to read my TL;DR walls of text about the situation, and excuse me If don't get my point across sometimes, but English is not my native language, none the less, if you have any doubt or question, I'll try to answer to the best of my abilities. :awesome:
ARe you allowed firearms because your in the military?
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

plagaboy
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2019 8:06 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Dawn of the Dead, 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later, Shawn of the Dead, Zombieland.
Location: Venezuela

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by plagaboy » Tue May 07, 2019 2:39 pm

moab wrote:
Tue May 07, 2019 2:27 pm
ARe you allowed firearms because your in the military?
With enough money and connections, maybe...

A legal gun can be incredibly expensive, US$ 2.500 for a glock17 with a little less use than Jenna Jameson is not unheard of, plus almost the same amount for the paperwork and you have to be well connected from what a friend who was trying to get one said to me, and ammo is really hard to come by these days.

User avatar
moab
* * * * *
Posts: 3496
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:07 pm

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by moab » Tue May 07, 2019 5:22 pm

plagaboy wrote:
Tue May 07, 2019 2:39 pm
moab wrote:
Tue May 07, 2019 2:27 pm
ARe you allowed firearms because your in the military?
With enough money and connections, maybe...

A legal gun can be incredibly expensive, US$ 2.500 for a glock17 with a little less use than Jenna Jameson is not unheard of, plus almost the same amount for the paperwork and you have to be well connected from what a friend who was trying to get one said to me, and ammo is really hard to come by these days.
What about vehicles? ARe you set up to drive out or walk out or both?

Wow. That's a lot for a Glock. Are there restrictions on other weapons? Do you have other means to defend yourself?

Did you do any prepping before this? HAve your preps helped?
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Thu May 09, 2019 8:52 am


MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Thu May 09, 2019 7:49 pm


MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sat May 11, 2019 7:45 pm

This is being linked to the ongoing crisis in Venezuela.

From CBS News: Cuba begins widespread rationing due to shortages



User avatar
moab
* * * * *
Posts: 3496
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:07 pm

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by moab » Wed May 15, 2019 9:26 pm

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-vene ... SKCN1SL2WI

Both sides meeting in Norway for talks. Or "possible" talks.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

absinthe beginner
* * * * *
Posts: 1256
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:05 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shawn of the Dead
Location: Colorado

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by absinthe beginner » Sat May 18, 2019 9:39 am

Tear Gas And Condom Shortages In A Time Of Hyperinflation

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05- ... rinflation

Venezuela's hyperinflationary chaos has taken its toll on all aspects of life including dating, the focus of a new Bloomberg profile highlighting the challenges and pitfalls of single life in Caracas: blackouts, political rallies, condom shortages, tear gas, Molotov cocktails and deadly protests.

While the country experiences a massive exodus of roughly 10% of its total population, the effect on dating apps is almost comical. Many people listed on apps can see their prospective partner's location status zoom from just "1 mile away" to "1,000 miles away" in just days, as citizens emigrate to places like Chile, Mexico and Peru.

MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sat May 18, 2019 9:23 pm

absinthe beginner wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 9:39 am
Tear Gas And Condom Shortages In A Time Of Hyperinflation

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05- ... rinflation

Venezuela's hyperinflationary chaos has taken its toll on all aspects of life including dating, the focus of a new Bloomberg profile highlighting the challenges and pitfalls of single life in Caracas: blackouts, political rallies, condom shortages, tear gas, Molotov cocktails and deadly protests.

While the country experiences a massive exodus of roughly 10% of its total population, the effect on dating apps is almost comical. Many people listed on apps can see their prospective partner's location status zoom from just "1 mile away" to "1,000 miles away" in just days, as citizens emigrate to places like Chile, Mexico and Peru.
You beat me to this. Condom shortages, who knew? :D

User avatar
moab
* * * * *
Posts: 3496
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:07 pm

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by moab » Sat May 18, 2019 11:25 pm

MPMalloy wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 9:23 pm
absinthe beginner wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 9:39 am
Tear Gas And Condom Shortages In A Time Of Hyperinflation

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05- ... rinflation

Venezuela's hyperinflationary chaos has taken its toll on all aspects of life including dating, the focus of a new Bloomberg profile highlighting the challenges and pitfalls of single life in Caracas: blackouts, political rallies, condom shortages, tear gas, Molotov cocktails and deadly protests.

While the country experiences a massive exodus of roughly 10% of its total population, the effect on dating apps is almost comical. Many people listed on apps can see their prospective partner's location status zoom from just "1 mile away" to "1,000 miles away" in just days, as citizens emigrate to places like Chile, Mexico and Peru.
You beat me to this. Condom shortages, who knew? :D
LOL! (my best Butthead imitation here) Made me laugh. I needed that. Thanks.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Sat May 25, 2019 9:48 pm


MPMalloy
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4176
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:48 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by MPMalloy » Tue May 28, 2019 1:21 pm

From The AP: In Venezuela, criminals feel the pinch of an economic crisis

When a punk can't make a buck, it's bad.


User avatar
moab
* * * * *
Posts: 3496
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:07 pm

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by moab » Sun Jun 09, 2019 7:37 pm

"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

User avatar
flybynight
* * * * *
Posts: 2646
Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:30 am

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by flybynight » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:01 pm

I'm kinda done with this thread. With all the chances the Venezuelan people have had in the last couple years to affect change and their whole hearted rush to vote in the persons and laws that afflict them. I can only surmise that the reason Venezuela ended up this way is because the people there want it this way. And any outside influence that topples the current regime will only end up with another like regime taking power by popular vote of the majority. You can't fix stupid
As of now I bet you got me wrong

John Titor was right

User avatar
Stercutus
* * * * *
Posts: 12936
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:16 pm
Location: Home where my thought's escaping

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by Stercutus » Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:55 pm

flybynight wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:01 pm
I'm kinda done with this thread. With all the chances the Venezuelan people have had in the last couple years to affect change and their whole hearted rush to vote in the persons and laws that afflict them. I can only surmise that the reason Venezuela ended up this way is because the people there want it this way. And any outside influence that topples the current regime will only end up with another like regime taking power by popular vote of the majority. You can't fix stupid
That was kind of the takeaway from the get-go. The smartest people left years ago. Surrounding nations are being flooded with refugees for all the ones with any common sense left. As more people leave Maduro can continue to consolidate power. Ruling over a garbage dump is still ruling.
These days of dust
Which we've known
Will blow away with this new Son

But I'll kneel down wait for now
And I'll kneel down
Know my ground

User avatar
RickOShea
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 8912
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 5:24 pm
Location: Gulf Coast, AL

Re: How did Venezuela end up this way?

Post by RickOShea » Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:15 pm

Miami Herald -Venezuela forces killed thousands, then covered it up, U.N. says


GENEVA — Venezuelan special forces have carried out thousands of extrajudicial killings in the past 18 months and then manipulated crime scenes to make it look as if the victims had been resisting arrest, the United Nations said Thursday in a report detailing wide-ranging government abuses targeting political opponents.

Special Action Forces described by witnesses as “death squads” killed 5,287 people in 2018 and another 1,569 by mid-May of this year, in what are officially termed by the Venezuelan government “Operations for the Liberation of the People,” U.N. investigators reported.

Laying out a detailed description of a lawless system of oppression, the report says the actual number of deaths could be much higher. It cites accounts by independent groups who report more than 9,000 killings for “resistance to authority” over the same period.

The report, which U.N. human rights chief Michelle Bachelet will present to the Human Rights Council in Geneva on Friday, delivers a scathing critique of President Nicolás Maduro’s embattled government and its handling of Venezuela’s deepening political and economic crisis.
whisk.e.rebellion wrote: It's not what you say anymore. It's how you say it.

Image ............................................................................................................................................................................................Image

Post Reply

Return to “Disasters in Current Events”