Jungian Collective Unconscious

Topics regarding the study of zombie behavior and physiology. Know your enemy.

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noncyr
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Jungian Collective Unconscious

Post by noncyr » Fri May 07, 2004 12:08 am

The seeming ability among zombies to learn or recall things from life (e.g. using tools, turning a door handle) may be an example of the Jungian collective unconscious at work. These could just be mental patterns that have been repeated so often in humans for so long that they might not reflect any actual thought or personal memories at all.

Discuss..
Blergh

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Post by Jeremy » Fri May 07, 2004 11:53 pm

Nah, I don't belive anything that we do has been that much of a survival requirement to actually have become ingrained into our biological system.
The only good example I can think of is sneazing when you look at a bright light. OR sneazing when you have an intense pain near your nose.
Those are more just kinda survival-ish responses.
It's not like your prodigy will instictually know how to open a door. It's not required.
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Post by noncyr » Sat May 08, 2004 12:30 pm

It would be if wombs had doors though. I'll get on that right away.
Blergh

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Post by Jeff » Sat May 08, 2004 9:40 pm

Truthfully, I don't have any faith in the "collective unconcious" theory because it was, as with Freud's utter obsession with the supposed human obsession with sex, one of the things that I don't really see in human beings.

As far as their turning doorknobs and using tools, I think it is simply an ingrained response, burned into our neural pathways, kind of like lots of people will remember their own social security number through sheer repitition of use.
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Post by jamoni » Sat Jun 19, 2004 10:39 am

I think that zombies will still retain a bit of the natural human desire to mess with things. I mean, if you have hands, you grab stuff. You may even turn a doorknob by acident if agitated enough, or just because it feels neet to wiggle it. The thing is, I don't think they LEARN from this, it's just sort of random. I mean, I can see a zombie OPENING a door, but I can't see one closing it and locking it behind him, and I doubt if he were shut into a room that he would just go straight to the door and open it. It would take him a while to wander over there, become interested in the knob, and start messing with it. He might lose interest and wander off again. Who knows?
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Post by Zardoz » Sat Jun 19, 2004 10:42 am

Robocop still remembered certain things from his past even though most of his brain was missing.

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Post by jamoni » Sat Jun 19, 2004 11:00 am

True. However:
The parts of his brain that were left were healthy and intact. The modern idea of memories is that they are distributed across the network of brain cells, rather than focused in one spot. So taking a chunk out will not effect memory nearly as much as an overall degradation of brain tissue. Or so they tell me. :D
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Post by ProZombieHunter » Sat Jun 19, 2004 12:57 pm

ALSO: The Terminator had a very concise memory, which, due to his time-travelling nature, actually converged occasionally with the ability of precognition.

This is important because, with a superior memory, the Terminator could kick Robocop's ass.
If you drop a zombie, does that count as a kill?

...Think about it.

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Post by nicklefish » Sat Jun 19, 2004 1:23 pm

Just a little thought. Ever notice when you give a baby something, it's usually straight to the mouth, then a bit of shaking? Also, if you put something in front of a baby, say, your finger, they automatically reach for it, then once grasped, it's straight to the mouth? Maybe it's hardwired into our head, and once we grow up and gain cognition, we no longer need to explore things in such a manner. Maybe once the virus/bacteria/kool-aid sets in, we revert back to being babies. With teeth.
Just a thought.
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Post by ProZombieHunter » Sat Jun 19, 2004 4:14 pm

Doubtful. Babies are able to comprehend things that make sense and things that don't.

(A car passing behind three well spaced trees makes sense. A baby grows bored with it. A car passing behind the first tree, and then reappearing on the other side of the third as if it teleported surprises and enchants a baby, because it doesn't make sense. I have seen a video with the experiment on it.)

In any case, I don't think zombies would ever have any kind of propensity for... You know... Rattles... And I doubt that they CRY...
If you drop a zombie, does that count as a kill?

...Think about it.

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Post by will » Sat Jun 19, 2004 7:17 pm

zombies only cry when they are REALY REALY sad!
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Post by Zardoz » Sun Jun 20, 2004 2:24 pm

sticking things in your mouth is the very earliest instinct on almost all mammals. Its the one thing they know to do from birth, bite on the nipple or whatever they can stuff in their mouth. But the Zombie instinct to bite and attack might be older than that and rely on the ancient reptile part of the brain, to attack and devour. A zombie brain is a rotting mess, I doubt they would have memories of anything. Your mother wouldn't remember you, she'd take a bite out of you (if she was a zombie, if not seek family counseling).

That babies things have disappeared if put behind a screen is an interesting concept to explore in zombies. If they saw you and you hid behind something, would they attack that thing or try to go around? Would they only see you if they accidentally tripped and saw you behind the screen?

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Post by ProZombieHunter » Sun Jun 20, 2004 4:33 pm

It's seems likely that a zombie's brain would act on a trail-and-error level with this kind of scenario.

Here is my hypothesis:

If the zombie's at point A and you're at point B, the zombie will try to go straight from point A to point B. This is logical. But say there's a pane of bullet-proof glass between yourself and the zombie. Being unable to reach you, the zombie would try to go through the glass.

That is where trial and error come into play. Finding that breaching the glass proves impossible, the zombie then seeks a way to circumvent it, i.e., going around, crawling under, or perhaps (given the right circumstances) climbing over.
If you drop a zombie, does that count as a kill?

...Think about it.

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Post by jamoni » Sun Jun 20, 2004 5:10 pm

Perhaps, but remember that a zombie would probably lose track of which tacts he's already tried. So he would end up trying the same solutions over and over, at random. And I believe most of his "solutions" are going to be:
1. Banging on things
2. Grabbing things
3. Biting things
Unless these or a combination of these can circumvent the obstacle, you've got one stuck zombie, IMHO.
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Post by ProZombieHunter » Sun Jun 20, 2004 5:12 pm

Good point Jamoni.

I had forgotten that the zombie brain operates less like the brain of a chimp, and more like the brain of a goldfish.
If you drop a zombie, does that count as a kill?

...Think about it.

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