The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by ineffableone » Mon Jun 11, 2012 8:32 pm

I gave up on BOBs, just too small and difficult to pack in enough. I instead went the INCH route as I feel anything that drives me out of my home will mean I will be gone more than 72 hrs.

My INCH has never been weighed (I don't own a scale) but I am guessing it is around 80-90 lbs. It is a combo of an ILBE pack and Ribz front pack, so some of that weight is actually front not on the back and this does make a difference in the load carry. I also have 3 other additional packs. A duffel with extra sleeping gear and tarp + a bit of misc emergency gear and food in case for some reason I can only grab this pack. A food ration pack filled with survival tabs and mainstay bars and emergency water 2 months worth of rations + a few emergency supplies in case this is the only pack I can grab. Finally kitchen pack, filled with luxury items for setting up a decent camp kitchen + a bunch of seeds to plant a garden.

The extra packs are for tossing into a BOV and taking with me along with my main INCH packs. If needed I can cache the extra packs after ditching my BOV and maybe end up coming back for them or maybe not. As I mentioned two of those packs have extra emergency gear in them in case for some reason I loose the rest of my gear. Each has stuff like a knife, space blankets fire starter, mini first aide, etc. But they are mainly filled with the extra gear (sleeping or rations). My ILBE is my main pack and is basically self contained survival. I could live indefinitely out of this pack. My Ribz pack carries some snacks, knives, firestarters, tools, etc that are needed easy quick access while hiking. The Ribz pack is something I would pretty much never be separated from in PAW as I can carry a lot of essentials easily in there but have them pretty much out of the way.

For me I am looking at long term if I bug out, and so went INCH rather than BOB. I also went with a heavy pack in it self, and a lot of my gear is not exactly ultra light. Where possible I did go light like my Tri-Ti 3 fuel Caldera stove. I am however more concerned about durability than weight when thinking INCH gear. I am thinking I don't want my stuff breaking or running out of purpose after a week. For me I don't expect to constantly haul this pack, but to hike to a place I can at least safely set up a base camp.

*edit, BTW yes I have hiked with this system, ILBE and RIBZ packs, and did fine. I also take them out into my back yard, a large forested area, at least once a week and hike there in circles for at least an hour to stay in shape and used to the pack.
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by shrimpwd » Tue Jun 12, 2012 12:23 am

derf26 wrote:Also, how useful have hiking poles (if you've ever used them) been when you twisted an ankle, or got some other leg injury?
Since I just had a trip with a hiking pole and an ankle sore enough to bother me...

I did over 13 miles of strenuous terrain while my ankle was swollen. Having the extra 'leg' to use was very useful, and I got into a rhythm to relieve pressure after only a few minutes. If I hadn't had the pole, I'm not sure I'd have made it home. (or at least I wouldn't have met my pre-planned ride)

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by Kutter_0311 » Tue Jun 12, 2012 1:05 am

SpeedBug wrote:To those who have offered much welcomed constructive criticism, thank you!

I will look into your suggestions as this is why I posted here... new ideas, new options, gear suggestions, approaches to current problems... just like you, my bug is and always will be a work in progress...
I don't think anyone's kit is 'finished' unless they're too dead to make use of it anymore :lol:

Evolution is constant, or at least a punctuated equilibrium, as with most things. As long as you are alive, you should be able to find new ways to adapt your gear to the changing world. The trick is being able to move what needs moving :wink:
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by derf26 » Tue Jun 12, 2012 1:29 am

shrimpwd wrote:
derf26 wrote:Also, how useful have hiking poles (if you've ever used them) been when you twisted an ankle, or got some other leg injury?
Since I just had a trip with a hiking pole and an ankle sore enough to bother me...

I did over 13 miles of strenuous terrain while my ankle was swollen. Having the extra 'leg' to use was very useful, and I got into a rhythm to relieve pressure after only a few minutes. If I hadn't had the pole, I'm not sure I'd have made it home. (or at least I wouldn't have met my pre-planned ride)
Thanks for the input! I always figured they'd do well as spare crutches.
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by ODA 226 » Tue Jun 12, 2012 1:42 am

SpeedBug wrote:To those who have offered much welcomed constructive criticism, thank you!

I will look into your suggestions as this is why I posted here... new ideas, new options, gear suggestions, approaches to current problems... just like you, my bug is and always will be a work in progress...

To those who are for reasons passing understanding, angry and you perceive that I have challenged you and what you believe as the only option... sorry, you can have a cookie if you like. I honestly don't know what else to say to you...

I realize that what works for me probably won't work for anyone else, I said as much in my opening post.

I wanted to know what the thinking was behind folks who chose to go with massively heavy packs... and some took that as an attack... some of you have some thin skin to be as tough as you claim you are...

Sorry for upsetting you...

My humble apologies...
This thin-skinned guy accepts your apology. I like macademia cookies. Where and when were you in Iraq and will you please post pics of your setup?
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by SpeedBug » Tue Jun 12, 2012 4:13 am

ODA 226 wrote:
This thin-skinned guy accepts your apology. I like macademia cookies. Where and when were you in Iraq and will you please post pics of your setup?[/quote]

194th Engineers Brigade TN National Guard, Joint Base Balad 2009-10

Not sure about the macadamia's you don't want me near anything more dangerous than a microwave, I'll see if the bakery has any! :lol:

I'll get some pics up ASAP, I need to unpack it anyways and check the expiration dates on my food etc...

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by Keith B » Tue Jun 12, 2012 9:39 am

SpeedBug wrote:
ODA 226 wrote: This thin-skinned guy accepts your apology. I like macademia cookies. Where and when were you in Iraq and will you please post pics of your setup?
194th Engineers Brigade TN National Guard, Joint Base Balad 2009-10

.
That explains everything! :lol:

I too accept your apology. Hopefully your cookies are better done then your apology, I dont like mine half baked.

I look forward to the pics of your set up, and if you are ever in the Spokane area, bring your ruck and we will go for a walk. If you can keep up I will buy you dinner!
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by ODA 226 » Wed Jun 13, 2012 6:00 am

sigboy40 wrote:
SpeedBug wrote:
ODA 226 wrote: This thin-skinned guy accepts your apology. I like macademia cookies. Where and when were you in Iraq and will you please post pics of your setup?
194th Engineers Brigade TN National Guard, Joint Base Balad 2009-10

.
That explains everything! :lol:

I too accept your apology. Hopefully your cookies are better done then your apology, I dont like mine half baked.

I look forward to the pics of your set up, and if you are ever in the Spokane area, bring your ruck and we will go for a walk. If you can keep up I will buy you dinner!
Speedbug: I was a ten minute flight from you at Taji from 2004 to 2007.
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by onenineoneonemergency » Sun Jun 17, 2012 10:21 am

There are many things to factor into how much/what you put in your BOB/INCH. Your area of operation (weather/temperatures you might experience), experience/skill/Macgyverness level, philosophy/methodology (how comfortable you are with proximity to death or serious injury), level of physical fitness and monetary/time allowance. All of these factors have a huge impact on how much your bag weighs, and if you eliminate any of these from your individual analysis of another’s preparations for the worst it’s a biased appraisal.

By way of example, I live in area where the weather can be pretty schizophrenic. A warm top, hat and gloves virtually never leave any of my bags. Every year I see the potential for or actually get caught in weather that I’m simply not prepared for. Some people live in areas where they don’t experience such erratic weather patterns and don’t experience drastic climate change throughout the year. In my AO it can be 10 below or near100 plus in any given year requiring gear to be carried for rapid change in environmental conditions. Sometimes I wouldn’t wish the weather we get around here on my worst BOB building enemy.

If I’m a part time survival instructor I might find it easier to rely on my accumulated skills and less dependent upon my kit allowing me to carry less but I would say that the people that make a living doing this kind of instruction represent the minority of forum members. I practice some primitive skills when time allows in 60hr work week but there are very few that I’ve mastered to the point that I have come to rely on them to the point that they supplant some major part of my kit, a piece of kit that might be considered a regular fixture in a normal BOB/INCH. This kind of overlaps with the whole time/money allowance thing.

Some people have a different view of what this global/local disaster that forces them out of doors will be. This is shaped by past experience, age, race, income, religion, how many John Woo movies they’ve seen, how many times they’ve beaten COD and a number of other factors I won’t name here. How these variables effect an individuals ability to survive in any given situation is, often times only discovered when the “rubber meets the road”. I often think that people put far too much emphasis on taking life and far too little on preserving it but to each his own and any assumptions made about what will happen in a Bug Out scenario is just that, an assumption (and we all know what happens when we assume). The guy that carries enough ammunition to be an ambulatory WWIII will perpetually find himself reaching for that extra set of gloves or MRE he should’ve brought and the guy that goes light on the armament will perpetually find himself reaching for that extra mag he should’ve brought; generally whatever can happen will happen. My philosophy might get me killed but then again the reverse might be true. This also overlaps with your AO, are you in a big city, do you live in the country? Philosophy and attitude are huge factors when it comes to what you carry in why. I carry a lot of stuff because I feel that survival in an extended or short term disaster is a bit like scuba diving. Some people will go on a 30 min dive with 31 minutes of O2 some don’t mind the extra weight or the comfort afforded them by carrying an hour. It often comes down to mobility vs. preparedness argument. Some guy’s packs look a like a butcher shop and others figure they will flint knap a knife in the need arises, both are unrealistic pipe dreams just at two ends of the spectrum.

Your level of physical fitness has a lot to do with it. I know I guy that looks at my pack longingly and follows a similar carry philosophy as me. He’s essentially 50, has been hit by a forklift and as a result required knee replacement surgery and is nearing 100lbs overweight. I am substantially thinner, younger, fitter and have no prior, serious injuries to speak of. Know you limitations and don’t be embarrassed by them. Adopt a carry philosophy that works for you with your limitations in mind and spare us the torture that is you trying to sell your carry system/philosophy as the best or the end all be all for everyone across the board.

I buy a lot of the ultralight kit; titanium this and sil nylon that but it doesn’t matter if you buy the ultralight kit if you carry 100lbs of it.

My packs vary from 40lbs al the way up 70lbs. The 70lbs pack that I carry, I feel is pretty slim and trim and fills the role of what you might call an INCH bag. I am constantly envisioning scenarios that would develop that the bag contents just couldn’t deal with. You can’t be prepared for everything.

I am constantly seeking ways to lighten my load through skill building, massive amounts of cash that I perceive to be expendable and changing my thinking. Like others have said on this forum it’s all constantly evolving through use and evaluation but this process happens on an individual level. The minute it stops happening on an individual level is when people begin to miss the point.

I’ve noticed that ODA 226 has a fun loving 11 year old brat tagging along with him. I’ve got a bratty little nephew that I love spending time with as well. If I had to provide security for both myself and my nephew you might catch my pack ballooning to 100lbs as well, something to consider. I think his post was really good, and I’ve read it once, I plan to go back and read most of it again.


I like to have some sort of detachable pack/subload/buttpack that contains what I would consider absolute essentials (I know what you’re thinking if there are any nonessential items in your bag get ride of them, depends on what you define as essential). This subload should be able to detached from your main ruck and carried, comfortably on its own. I build virtually all my packs (that are going to be used for more than a day) this way. You can separate this subload and carry it with you when you hunt, on short jaunts, around camp or when you have to move really, really fast. This is nothing new. In military circles it might be called and E&E kit. British SAS troopers and other soldiers run these essentials in the pockets or belt order. In my estimation EVERY bag should be equipped this way. A person that carries a 35lbs pack can move fast but find that they are short on supplies a person that sets up their rig as mentioned above can always ditch the main ruck and start Hall & Oats with their E&E kit at will. I have two buddies that are trying to get up and running and they just but a mil lashing strap (waist strap), the arm sling that one usually finds affixed to the surp 2 quart canteen covers (over the shoulder) and an ALICE buttpack. They spent all of $15 on the whole rig and now they have a way to carry their essentials. You can use the ALICE pistol belt and associated suspenders if you wanted to carry a bit more weight/gear.

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by ODA 226 » Sun Jun 17, 2012 11:10 am

@Onenineoneoneemergency:

Great post! You have a comprehensive understanding of what an INCH really is. Your example of a diver that expects to dive for 30 minutes with 31 minutes of O2 says it all. Your example of the SAS running with their pockets or belt reflects the quote in my signature which pretty much says it all:

"You survive out of your pockets, fight out of your web gear, and live out of your rucksack."
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by Tetra Grammaton Cleric » Sun Jun 17, 2012 11:21 am

Awesome post in a thread full of awesome posts Onenineoneoneemergency.

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:24 pm

ODA 226 wrote:@Onenineoneoneemergency:

Great post! You have a comprehensive understanding of what an INCH really is. Your example of a diver that expects to dive for 30 minutes with 31 minutes of O2 says it all. Your example of the SAS running with their pockets or belt reflects the quote in my signature which pretty much says it all:

"You survive out of your pockets, fight out of your web gear, and live out of your rucksack."
"You never really own anything more than you ca carry with you at a dead sprint."

As overloaded as my INCH bag is now (it's my trunk, more or less) I'm constantly trying to lighten it by learning new skills. Skills can only be taken from you by lack of practice or blunt head trauma.
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by We'reWolf » Sun Jun 17, 2012 2:22 pm

offcamber wrote:
2-3 liter camel-baks - 13.2 lbs
doesn't that seems a bit much? almost 14 pounds for water that is weighing only 7 pounds (I rounded up)? i doubt the camel back weighs another 7 pounds.
1 liter=2.2 pounds
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by shrimpwd » Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:06 pm

We'reWolf wrote:
offcamber wrote:
2-3 liter camel-baks - 13.2 lbs
doesn't that seems a bit much? almost 14 pounds for water that is weighing only 7 pounds (I rounded up)? i doubt the camel back weighs another 7 pounds.
1 liter=2.2 pounds
I think he is trying to state that he has 2 of the 3L camelbaks, or, 6L water.

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by We'reWolf » Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:10 pm

ah my miss understanding lol
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by offcamber » Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:15 pm

Yeah, I interpreted it as two 3L Camelbak bladders.. I guess it could be 2 or 3 one liter camelbak bottles, I hadn't actually thought of that.

That being the case, you are correct, it would be a max of 6.6lbs.

My math was 6 liters at 2.2lbs = 13.2.

Maybe the OP will clarify.

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by onenineoneonemergency » Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:13 pm

Awesome quote, and so true. I hadn’t noticed your SIG ODA 226. I guess being more observant is something I need to work on as well.

When looking at another’s bag there other considerations that you might want to look at as well. Consumables. I have an INCH bag and it’s complemented by a bit lighter 3day bag. I carry primarily dehydrated food in my INCH bag and MREs in my 3day. The MREs weighing far more than three days of the dehydrated stuff. The 3day bag is supposed to much lighter, and, overall it is. Why not carry the dehydrated stuff. The simple answer is (and the answer that pertains to this topic) I know that they’ll be consumed over the course of a couple of days and the weight of the bag will greatly diminish by the time I get to my intended location (MREs can be substantially faster and less complex to prepare). Sure I could cut weight by adding the freeze dried/low moisture foods but I desire simplicity and speed given that the 3day bag is designed to get me to a certain location as fast humanly possible (which doesn’t always mean as light as humanly possible). I will probably be operating in a primarily urban/suburban environment it’s built accordingly. Yes water weighs a ton…initially. In any and all environments water will be consumed quite rapidly. Potable water is about the last thing that I would want to go light on but if the situation demands it that option is available to me. If you simply do not have the ability to carry a lot of water you will find that you have to stop frequently to replenish your supply, subsequently slowing progress causing you to be just as slow or slower (depending on the availability of sites for collection) than the guy with the 100lbs pack.

Eastern cultures seem to understand the Yin and Yang of all things. That for every benefit there is a drawback. The existence of this give and take makes it very hard to knock another’s gear or even offer much in the way of real criticism (if that gear/bag is built with real world knowledge, experience and honesty). I’m playing the devil’s advocated here, a role you will see me playing quite often.

There is real argument for keeping an INCH bag at the cusp of your physical ability though. If I delete an item I think that I don’t need or eliminate the weight associated with another item, something else seems fill the void left. This is, quite simply because I want as much utility and safety afforded me by the pack as I can fit on my back. Call me overly cautious.

ODA 226 I don’t want to get off topic because there is some really awesome discussion going on here but could you PM with the source of your trip flares (I know you may not want to discuss this, if that is the case I respect that). As a way of possibly eliminating weight have you ever looked at the Brite Strike Camp Alert Perimeter Security System? Brigade Qaurter Master sells a regular and IR version. It has the potential to be used as a flashlight stand alone but can also be used for camp security whereas your trip flares can really only function as trip flares. I know that it is an electronic device and there are batteries associated with its use. Just a suggestion.

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by ODA 226 » Mon Jun 18, 2012 1:36 am

0911emergency:
I bought those trip flares at a gunshow over 20 years ago along with parachute flares for about $25.00. It was a great deal at the time, but I believe that the sale of those items may be restricted today. I've kept everything hermetically sealed in plastic and in USGA Ammo cans with O2 absorbers, plus climate controlled storage. I'm pretty sure they will work still.

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by cap6888 » Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:47 am

I'm really loving this thread. Especially since there have been so many other threads about ultra lightweight ger lately. Food and water, in my eyes, always seems to be the most problematic when it comes to weight. I have seen many pics of bags (you choose the acronym) that either only have two or three liters of water or show a weight "without water". Those of us that have done time in the field in Iraq or Afghanistan can attest to how important it is to carry plenty of water, and also the extra weight (which diminishes as the mission goes on) is well worth it.

That being said, I often see people packing dehydrated or freeze dried meals to cut down on weight. While this type of food is a weight savings, one should take into consideration the weight of water that is required to prepare the food. This begs the questions, how does one pack of freeze dried food plus the weight of required water weigh, and how does it compare to an MRE entree? I don't know the answer to this, but see an experiment in my future to figure this out. I would rationalize that unless the weight is still substantially less, I would opt for the convenience of ripping open a pack of food and eating it, rather than having to take the time and resources to boil water to prepare a meal.

Just some more "food" for thought. :mrgreen:

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Mon Jun 18, 2012 9:48 am

Thing is, if your in a very waterlogged environment (try digging a 6" hole in Florida) water is less of an issue, but purification becomes more important. I saw (on another site) someone's "Must have" list for every BOB and INCH, and itfell apart because he didn't take into account that gear is largely a personal thing based on conditions, training and comfort.

That's just where I fall on things, so I'd be packing a 3L bladder and a couple bottles with more purification supplies than extra water. In Arizona, more water might be prudent.
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by onenineoneonemergency » Mon Jun 18, 2012 4:51 pm

ODA 226 it seems that restriction seems to be the going trend. You’re probably right about not being able to get them anymore. I’ve not seen any at any gun show that I’ve been to recently. I did find some awesome German parachute flares though, and got them for a pretty good deal. They’re quite heavy and large but I like the security afforded by ripping bag on a string then trying to build a signal fire with a broken arm (a task I have difficulty with, in some conditions, with two fully functional arms). They seem really well made.

As far as dehydrated food is concerned; it’s not just a matter of weight. I use this pack often in weather extremes. There’s a chance, however small, that a high moisture meal like an MRE could freeze, possibly compromising the packaging. This highly unlikely considering you will be carrying it in a bag with other items such as clothing that will keep it pretty well insulated. Low/no moisture foods are not subject to the possibility of the packaging becoming compromised in this fashion. In truth I carry some high moisture foods; the ratios something like 75/25 (if you want a rough figure). The high moisture foods come in the form of mostly FSRs (First Strike Rations). Though they don’t anywhere near the coloric value of an MRE they share the ease of preparation. They’re there for when I can’t stop, don’t have enough time or security concerns prohibit me from using a stove/fire or obtaining water from a source outside my bag. I’ve contributed a lot of thought to what you’ve outlined in your post and still elect to carry freeze dried foods for the above reasons. I guess if I couldn’t find a lake/stream/snow or other body of water I would be f#$%&d, which is often the case with any decision you make when it comes to your kit. I think the US military issued an MRE for use in arctic and subarctic conditions and it contained freeze dried food and more food or food higher in calories to meet the dietary demands of soldiers in such areas. The foods were freeze dried to prevent them from freezing. I guess if it gets cold enough to freeze my FSRs I lose 25% of my food stores but if I can’t find water I lose 75%. I guess I’ll need to think about it some more. Though its not as if I live in the Sahara.

I'm sure you've experienced the psychological hurdle that is adding something as small as 3days worth of MREs to your kit. If anyone reading this has not please rip open an MRE, fully field strip it (yeah thats right no heaters), seal it up and throw 9 of them in your kit see if that doesn't take a little of the pep out of your step.
Last edited by onenineoneonemergency on Tue Jun 19, 2012 3:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by cap6888 » Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:25 pm

1911emergency- I have had the Arctic MREs, ironically enough, when I was in Iraq. They are freeze dried entrees, which assuming you are in the arctic, water will be plentiful. By the way, they are way more yummy than the regular ones. They also contain more food, thus making the package larger.

That being said, I can appreciate the weight savings that can be achieved by carrying freeze dried meals over MREs. I didn't have any choice when I was in the Army. Like you said, even field stripped, they are still considerably weighty.

In my AO, I highly doubt MREs would freeze unless they were left outside for a loooooooooong time in the worst winter ever. I suppose there is that possibility if there was a "The Day After Tomorrow" type PAW, but I don't see that happening.

Doc Torr- I understand your point about not carrying extra water, depending on your AO and what is readily available. If you only carry freeze dried meals (and your not carrying extra water), you will not only have to treat water to cook, but still treat water to drink. If you have plenty of water sources, then you are good to go. In a worst case scenario, if water is scarce due to dead zombies in the drinking water or whatever the PAW may be, the little bit of water you may find would be better suited for drinking then preparing food.

In the end, if i actually have to bug out of my home, i will be packing plenty of water and food. I will gladly deal with the additional weight. As its been said, as the days go one, the weight will diminish. But if your BOL is near a crystal clear mountain spring, then you are one lucky SOB! Water be dammed! :mrgreen:

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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by ODA 226 » Tue Jun 19, 2012 3:11 pm

cap6888 wrote: Doc Torr- I understand your point about not carrying extra water, depending on your AO and what is readily available. If you only carry freeze dried meals (and your not carrying extra water), you will not only have to treat water to cook, but still treat water to drink. If you have plenty of water sources, then you are good to go. In a worst case scenario, if water is scarce due to dead zombies in the drinking water or whatever the PAW may be, the little bit of water you may find would be better suited for drinking then preparing food.
I have about 1 gallon of water in my INCH and that is what I'll have to start with...old habits die hard...
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Re: The weight of your BUG Out Bag, INCH Bag, et al...

Post by Woods Walker » Tue Jun 19, 2012 3:18 pm

ODA 226 wrote:
cap6888 wrote: Doc Torr- I understand your point about not carrying extra water, depending on your AO and what is readily available. If you only carry freeze dried meals (and your not carrying extra water), you will not only have to treat water to cook, but still treat water to drink. If you have plenty of water sources, then you are good to go. In a worst case scenario, if water is scarce due to dead zombies in the drinking water or whatever the PAW may be, the little bit of water you may find would be better suited for drinking then preparing food.
I have about 1 gallon of water in my INCH and that is what I'll have to start with...old habits die hard...
Water is one of those things that gets more UL as the day grinds on.
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