Bugout Books?

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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cootshooter
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Bugout Books?

Post by cootshooter » Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:33 am

Just wondering if you guys pack books in your BOB... If so, which ones? Manuals? Maps? Nudie books?

A few that I have in the bag.
-Book of Knots
-US Army Survival Manual FM 21-76
-SAS Survival Handbook

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by teranaut » Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:07 pm

I always have a Pocket Ref in my bag. In the truck, there's an USAF survival manual and a fly fishing book. Aside from that, I'd have nothing to read but the labels on some of the equipment in my bag and a deck of cards.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by Honeypot » Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:34 pm

In my main car emergency bag, I have two Heinlein novels, and one collection of (light) SF short stories. There's also a compact wilderness first aid manual in my main FAK.

I might move the short story collection into my in-cabin kit (so I'll have something to read during life's regular/mini snafus), and fill the bag space with one of Wiseman's books.

I'm also thinking about moving the regular size NOLS Wilderness Medicine into the in-cabin kit, mainly so I'll actually read it during down time. :) It's been sitting on my stack of books-to-read, but I've barely browsed it (too much competition).
teranaut wrote:I always have a Pocket Ref in my bag.
Great idea! I've just added that to my list of Prep Things To Do. :)
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by quazi » Fri Mar 02, 2012 3:52 am

I have a copy of The Brothers Karamazov in what currently passes for the "packed suitcase" layer of my BOB. I put it in there because it's one of those books that seems really good but I never end up finishing. For a while now I've been meaning to switch it out with my Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy anthology. It seems like it would be somewhat lighter reading and might be even funnier because of the conditions I would be reading it in. On the other hand, those conditions might make it depressing. I might rip the last book out to save space and weight, plus it's a downer.

I'm going to add a pocket ref to my packed suitcase eventually.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by 111t » Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:31 pm

Honeypot wrote:In my main car emergency bag, I have two Heinlein novels, and one collection of (light) SF short stories. There's also a compact wilderness first aid manual in my main FAK.

I might move the short story collection into my in-cabin kit (so I'll have something to read during life's regular/mini snafus), and fill the bag space with one of Wiseman's books.

I'm also thinking about moving the regular size NOLS Wilderness Medicine into the in-cabin kit, mainly so I'll actually read it during down time. :) It's been sitting on my stack of books-to-read, but I've barely browsed it (too much competition).
teranaut wrote:I always have a Pocket Ref in my bag.
Great idea! I've just added that to my list of Prep Things To Do. :)
So... Tunnel in the Sky and ...what?

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by SpeedBug » Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:08 pm

The US Army Ranger handbook

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by zombiepreparation » Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:51 pm

cootshooter wrote: A few that I have in the bag.
-Book of Knots
-US Army Survival Manual FM 21-76
-SAS Survival Handbook
I had not thought of those books like that. Good idea. I just put my most re-readable one in: Shimumi by Trevanian. Seems like, hold on..... Found it! I've had a book for years setting and waiting for me to pick it up. It's G.Lynn's Camping And Camp Crafts. Simplistic 48 pages of everything from build-you-own just about everything to knots and some edible plants with nicely drawn intricate pictures. Shoot, It's a 1964 edition and feels fragile. I'll have to watch for another.

What a useful topic. I wouldn't have come to this idea on my own. 8-)

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by Honeypot » Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:30 am

111t wrote:So... Tunnel in the Sky and ...what?
LOL! Awesome educated guess! :)

Yes, it was the first, but I loaned it out about a year or two ago, and haven't received it back yet.

Currently, they're:
Farmer in the Sky
Friday
The former, because it's his #2 best Prepper novel (right behind Tunnel). :)
The latter solely because I'd picked up a copy at a used book store.

I really need to buy another copy of Moon is a Harsh Mistress and add it (all three of my copies are currently out on loan).

The short stories are a collection by Spider Robinson, uber-fan of RAH (one of his collections has a great obituary Spidey wrote for RAH).

To add to 111t's plug, if you haven't read any Heinlein, please give Tunnel and/or Farmer a try. They're technically part of his "juvenile" novels, but all that means is they're shorter (around 200 pages), and squeaky clean sex-wise (please, please, whatever you do, do NOT start your Heinlein education with anything he wrote after the 60's - they get progressively "weirder").

Many libraries now carry CD and/or downloadable audio versions of many Heinlein novels, and Audible also has an excellent selection (plus a one month free trial membership). I'm planning to get all available Heinlein books for an upcoming MP3 player purchase.

There are things about which I disagree with Heinlein, which is part of why he was, in my youth, the single most pivotal author in teaching me to think outside my comfort zone. :)
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by NeverReady » Wed Mar 14, 2012 8:22 am

cootshooter wrote:Just wondering if you guys pack books in your BOB... If so, which ones? Manuals? Maps? Nudie books?

-Book of Knots


This I think is a waste of space. I don't by into the idea that you need to know a 100 different knots, nor that you would be able to look them up in an emergency with relative ease. I would pick 6-10 knots, find some pictures of them with step by step on how to tie them. Next print them out, you could even go to WalGreens or alternative store to get them put onto photo paper for durability. This would only take up 10 pages at the most.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Wed Mar 14, 2012 8:34 am

I EDC my kindle as often as possible. I got about 30-35 books for free by searching diligently on Amazon, including some old medical and military references, as well as pre-1970 camping, BSA, and other "bushcrafty" books. Solar charger is about to become a staple for carry as well, once I manage to sew/sticth a solar-friendly exterior pocket to charge it with.

NeverReady: Why not? Plenty of knots you'll have time to practice, or take a second look at when you need them. Shelter isn't usually a "OMG I HAVE TO HAVE THIS UP IN 5 MINUTES!" thing, so you'd have time. Killing time is key in a bugout/survival situation, and practicing bushcraft skills is a great timekiller.
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by Acquisitor » Wed Mar 14, 2012 11:38 am

I carry a Collins Gem edition of the SAS Survival Guide and a small first aid manual. In addition to maps, my map case includes edible and medicinal plant guides and a star chart.

To me the books are insurance, and not a substitute for learning these skills beforehand.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by NeverReady » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:21 pm

Doc Torr wrote:I EDC my kindle as often as possible. I got about 30-35 books for free by searching diligently on Amazon, including some old medical and military references, as well as pre-1970 camping, BSA, and other "bushcrafty" books. Solar charger is about to become a staple for carry as well, once I manage to sew/sticth a solar-friendly exterior pocket to charge it with.

NeverReady: Why not? Plenty of knots you'll have time to practice, or take a second look at when you need them. Shelter isn't usually a "OMG I HAVE TO HAVE THIS UP IN 5 MINUTES!" thing, so you'd have time. Killing time is key in a bugout/survival situation, and practicing bushcraft skills is a great timekiller.

I actually think having a usable(flexible, water proof) solar panel stitched to the outside of a backpack to charge stuff on the inside is an excellent idea.

As far as the knot book is concerned.......In terms of a time killer I have no arguments against it. But in terms of usefulness on the go I don't see any value in having a book like that. I think of space, weight, and speed first. I generally don't think of BOL, I have a few in mind. 2 relatives houses located in 2 other states that is in the middle of nowhere would be my options at the moment. I also think of calorie expenditure and the cold. If you need to spend 30min looking up knots to pitch a tent, then that is 30 minutes of learning which it has been shown that you burn more calories doing this. Also it has been shown that self-control and clear thinking is diminished when your brain has to work harder for something.


Really though I don't know why I bothered to argue the point. If you actually study knots you will understand very quickly that many just don't have a point in learning. Pick up several books, and you will invariably see the author point to one knot, say a loop knot and say..."This one is the strongest, most stable, etc.." and then describe 10 variations that amount to the same thing, just less stable, less strong, etc...Go talk to a climber, ask him if he ever tries the 40 different styles of loop knots? I bet money he has 4 or less knots that don't tighten in on itself, maybe a few more that do. I mean the more and more I think about it the more ridiculous it sounds. You are standing there at the edge of a cliff, or top of a building, or trying to pitch a tent and reading through this book asking yourself "Hmmmmmmm, what's the best knot to use" while needing to choose from potentially hundreds of different knots.

Let me see if anyone disagrees with my list of 3 knots for most occasions.....

Water Knot: for tying two ropes together.
Figure Eight Loop: for making a simple non-tightening loop.
Tucked Overhand Double Loop: It's a noose.

In terms of dependability and ease of tying,99% of all your tasks can be done with those three knots. You might come up with 6-7 more, but not much more. I do think that you would not be doing your self an injustice by having one in your book shelf at your BOL, or BIL but not that usefull if you had to walk out of town, or some similar situation. I hope that helps.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Sun Mar 18, 2012 12:29 am

I disagree. Knot tying is a large part of rigging demo. I still have to study, even though there are 3-4 knots I need to know for my job. At no point do I know everything, and in a high-stress situation, it'll be tough to remember anything OTHER than the girth hitch, alt-tie#1, alt-tie#2, and Ulli Knot (slider) even though I tie about 15 different knots in non-demolition tasks.

I stand by my other points. I don't see most knot-tying as a life/death matter, and it gives 7you something to do.
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by omega_man » Sun Mar 18, 2012 12:43 am

A Sand County Almanac and any Peterson Bird Guide. BTW, hike out to a remote area, sit down, and read the essay "Thinking like a moutain" from the Sand County Almanac. If it doesn't move you, then I feel really sorry for you.
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by 111t » Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:49 pm

Honeypot wrote:
111t wrote:So... Tunnel in the Sky and ...what?
oh DUH... Farnham's Freehold. I'm such an idiot.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by Lynn LeFey » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:14 pm

Doc Torr wrote:I EDC my kindle as often as possible. I got about 30-35 books for free by searching diligently on Amazon
Check out Gutenburg.org
http://www.gutenberg.org/

It's an organization with the mission of taking all literature in the public domain, and making it available in digital format. There is a ton of awesome digital books there, to include most books considered 'classics'. If you're looking for entertainment reading, there's a lot of resources. If you're looking for other stuff... might be a bit harder to find.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by gillis » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:18 pm

local wild edible manual and regional wild edible cards. 2 pieces of scrap paper. Laminated maps and one small animal track reference.

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by creepingdeath » Tue Mar 20, 2012 5:35 pm

Just added the pocket SAS- highly recommend.
Would like to add an edibles book and maybe a disaster prep book.
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by 111t » Sat Sep 08, 2012 11:20 pm

Just read "the scarlet plague" by Jack London. He did an impressive job writing a SHTF futuristic post apocalyptic story with the fall of man set to take place in 2013. Available for free download as an e book or a free audio book. (libervox?) google it. You can't beat free.

It was so awesome that I went and ordered myself a 2012 silver dollar and then dug this thread up.

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All the best!
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"No, but any blade of grass"

Ferrocerium...You know how to spell it... This is how you pronounce it...[fer-oh-seer-ee-uhm]
Bushcraft/Dayhiking Kit
Three season 72 Hour Kit
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by JackBauer » Sun Sep 09, 2012 10:54 am

Smart phone (with kindle and Nook readers installed) and Nook color. Both devices have my entire digital prepping, survival and entertainment library installed.

Hard copies of the pocket SAS survival, Northeast peterson guides for faun and flora in my area. Several of my favorite science fiction books by Daniel Suarez, Neal Stephenson, etc.
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by breakcontact » Fri Sep 14, 2012 12:06 pm

Combat medic field reference and don't die out there card deck for bug out, for inch? Herbal antibiotics, another herbal home remedies that I forgot the title of, Davis Drug guide for nurses, pocket guide for suturing. Working on finding good book for modern homesteading, I can't remember if it's when there is no Doctor, or where there is no doctor, but one of them is another good medical ref. I plan on picking up. I also need an extensive edible plants guide for n. america. My thoughts on the books touches on bug out vs inch, I look at bugout as 72 hr or less, so all I need is the medic reference for any injuries during the 72 hrs and the quick over view of survival essentials in the playing cards, and they double as entertainment. Inch is the scenario where I see the need for a lot of ref. materials. Just my 2 and what I carry

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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by Deenie7 » Fri Sep 14, 2012 3:10 pm

breakcontact wrote:Combat medic field reference and don't die out there card deck for bug out, for inch? Herbal antibiotics, another herbal home remedies that I forgot the title of, Davis Drug guide for nurses, pocket guide for suturing. Working on finding good book for modern homesteading, I can't remember if it's when there is no Doctor, or where there is no doctor, but one of them is another good medical ref. I plan on picking up.
Where There Is No Doctor is available as a free PDF download from the publisher. It looks like you have to register but there's a "no thanks" button to skip that. Only downside is that it's split into separate chapters, rather than being a single PDF.

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Bugout Books?

Post by angelofwar » Fri Sep 14, 2012 3:48 pm

SpeedBug wrote:The US Army Ranger handbook
While I have several compact mil survival manuals, this is the best I've seen yet, mainly, for me, because it covers communication in depth, such as crafting field expedient antennas, etc.

A few of my other books I have that may or may not come with me are:
1) Army Personnel/General Manual (Leadership/Weapons usage)
2) A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine (Awesome book...shows A LOT of good "improvised" techniques, what you can do to save a life even when you may not have the gear, i.e. "safety pinning" some's jaw open to keep their airway open)
3) Build The Perfect Survival Kit (Great for helping you think out yer kit...I knew it was the book for me, as when I was flipping through, I had 90% of the stuff the author had...same make model...LOL!)
4) Special Forces Survival Guide (Got this as a Christmas present from my father in law...I wouldn't have bought it, although I appreciate it , but, it did have a few good tips in it)
5) FM21-76
6) Large edition AF Survival Manual; Probably my second best next to my ranger handbook...has detailed survival kits, navigation, etc.
7) Large Edition US Army Survival Manual; Has a lot of stuff from various manuals...good for browsing/bathroom book)
8) Weather Proof US Army Survival Manual (Weather proof pages, compact, has the essentials from 21-76 and the Ranger Handbook...this one stays in my BOB/Adventure Kit)
9) Various issued manuals covering NBC response, First Aid/Weapon Cleaning, etc.
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Re: Bugout Books?

Post by artilect » Fri Sep 14, 2012 4:53 pm

Check out Air Force Regulation 64-4 ... its published under many different names on the commercial market, such as "USAF Search and Rescue Survival Training" and so on... but this is HANDS DOWN the best survival manual I've ever read ... and I have a whole shelf full of them. Even recon Marines and other dudes from other branches swear by this manual.

The only caveat is that it can be big and heavy, depending on how its formatted. And there's a lot in there you may never use, because air crews could crash and have to survive anywhere from the middle of the ocean to the jungle to the Siberian tundra... (you could download the PDF and print out just the pages you need, and bind them together)


I also keep 2 or 3 paperbacks... practicing bushcraft/survival skills is fun now, but I think when we are doing them 18 hours out of every day just to stay alive, the last thing we're gonna want to do is sit down to relax and read about MORE bushcraft/survival skills...

It's important to have (safe) ways to escape from reality for a little while. I can see a lot of folks slipping into drugs and alcohol after the SHTF, or just outright nervous breakdown/apathy, and its going to be the ones with a lot of strength of character that will avoid that fate.

I think a lot of POWs and other long-term survivors felt really cut off and alone, so it might be a good idea to bring along some photos of your family and friends, small mementos, things of that nature... just stuff to keep you sane and help hold onto your humanity. Seems like it will be all too easy for us to become animals ready to do anything for our next meal, and we need to try to hang onto that part of us that makes us different from mere animals -- compassion, empathy, etc.
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