Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by wyomingiscold » Thu May 31, 2012 10:59 pm

Went to try a little brookie fishing in an area that I've never been in Bridger National Forest today. Remembered to take a few pics of my gear.


What I hauled in there...
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Ka-Bar Zombie Killer. I bought it on a whim when it first came out on Amazon. $50 delivered. I like it very much, but it is pretty dang heavy.
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Marlin 917 SS Bull-barrel in .17HMR. Real tack-driver of a rifle, but a very heavy load to haul. I probably won't haul this one into the woods like this again....
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My absolute favorite tool of all. Leatherman Wave. Use this knife everyday of my life.
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Garmin eTrex. Not the best on the market by far, but still a great GPS. Cheap Wal-Mart cell phone box. It works really well, but the phone bounces around in there a lot. Cut a few tips off a pine tree and stuffed them in the box with the phone and it stayed still then.
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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Gingerbread Man » Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:11 am

This tent failed horribly. The front tensioner tore and the tent slowly collapsed. This is not a good budget tent. FAIL.

We're going to go with Eureka! Solitaire.
Regular Guy wrote:Wenzel 2 man Tent $21 delivered from Amazon. Weight is 3.4 lbs and occupies 18x4x4" of space.
This will come with me on the next Mock Bug Out.
I put it up in about 5 minutes and sprayed it with Kiwi Camp Dry. It was very windy today and I couldn't feel any wind inside the tent. When they say two man, that's it. My son and I chilled out a minute in the tent and it was comfortable.
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Shrapnel wrote "nobody is trying to be a dick and give out warnings for every little thing" :|
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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Gingerbread Man » Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:30 am

Terma-Rest Scout Mattress
Horrible. Failed on the second day out on the trail. First night I was super comfortable and warm. I thought I was in heaven and I was sleeping on the ground under a poncho tarp. Next day my son laid down on it under a tarp, not in direct sunlight and it was fine. I sat down on it to make a sandwich and heard a horrible noise like a hiss. I was thinking some critter was mad, I spun around and saw a 8" bubble popping up. I'm instantly without a cushion and mad. That night sucked, the mat was flat and offered no comfort. I was pissed.
At the same time I bought this one I bought a foam one for my son. He loved his, he said it was comfortable, warm and didn't pop. I returned the damaged mat and got the same one I purchased for my son. http://www.academy.com/webapp/wcs/store ... =830450255" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Foam can't deflate.
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You can see the tent tearing at the front and the mat has yet to explode.
Shrapnel wrote "nobody is trying to be a dick and give out warnings for every little thing" :|
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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by wyomingiscold » Sun Jun 17, 2012 11:38 pm

Took another day hike and tried out one of the stove sets I made in the field.

Meal time. Clockwise from bottom. Cat Stove with stand. Fuel. Lid to Stanley cup. Back up stove. Stanley cup. MRE cookie. Texsport stainless cup. Aluminum ducting wind screen with eatin' utensils.
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Homemade water filter. Works pretty dang good...
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The stove performed very well. Dinner took about 3.5 minutes to boil and simmering was pretty easy if I stirred it regularly. The Stanley cup (@$10 at Wal-Mart) is great. Just dipped water from the lake with the lid and gently poured it into the filter which drained into the stainless cup. Very easy and excellent tasting water.

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Medic73 » Sun Jul 08, 2012 10:23 pm

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Here I am filtering creek water into my hydration bladder in my BOB/GHB using a Katadyne Hiker Pro Filter. Yes, the weapons are fake! Can't have anyone freak out while I'm out and about for the MOCK Bug Out Contest now, can we?

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This is my smallest BOB/GHB (with fake weapons) for another entry to the MOCK Bug Out Contest I'm working on.

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The contents of this BOB/GHB. Yes, it all fits!

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Keeping America safe from Zombies!

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by the_alias » Sat Sep 01, 2012 9:04 am

A short review of the Spresh bottle by source:
Man is a beast of prey

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by bacpacjac » Sat Sep 01, 2012 3:35 pm

My 9 yo and I made some hobo stoves over the winter, and this past weekend, we took one out and tried it out. So simple to make, easy to pack and it worked like a charm. This one is an apple juice can, that we xut using a can opener, nail and hammer, and tin snips. The grill is made of three snipped shish-kabob skewars. It's a still a little rough but it worked well.

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by mark9atq » Thu Sep 06, 2012 3:05 am

Just a suggestion on how to extend the useful life of any cartridge water filter like the Katadyn: don't let the
inlet hose lay in the muck at the bottom of the water source you are filtering. Propping it up
so it is free to suck the cleanest unfiltered water possible is the way to go. The katadyn's inlet will
float but the flexible hose always curls and brings the inlet back to shore to suck muck as you pump.

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One solution is to jam any handy sticks into the bottom to form an "X" that will hold the inlet out
in cleaner water. Of course trying not to stir up any extra muck as you do this. A rubber band to hold
the inlet to a tent stake (or stick) out in clear water works fine also.

I know from experience that a cartridge filter can be completely blocked in one day if the water inlet gets to close to the bottom while filtering drinking water.

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by wyominglostandfound » Fri Sep 07, 2012 2:07 pm

10 man with sidewalls

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http://www.wyominglostandfound.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I hunt therfore I am

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by wyominglostandfound » Fri Sep 21, 2012 6:56 pm

10 man custom tipi without sidewalls
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10 man custom tipi with sidewalls
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http://www.wyominglostandfound.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I hunt therfore I am

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Guy Fawkes » Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:48 pm

subbing
Google voluntaryism.

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by shrimpwd » Fri Oct 05, 2012 11:46 pm

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My new Tyvek Hex. Can't wait to hang my hammock under it.
(currently using my hammock's tree suspension. Need to fix that)

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Flying Lead » Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:45 am

mark9atq wrote:Just a suggestion on how to extend the useful life of any cartridge water filter like the Katadyn: don't let the
inlet hose lay in the muck at the bottom of the water source you are filtering. Propping it up
so it is free to suck the cleanest unfiltered water possible is the way to go. The katadyn's inlet will
float but the flexible hose always curls and brings the inlet back to shore to suck muck as you pump.

Image
Image

One solution is to jam any handy sticks into the bottom to form an "X" that will hold the inlet out
in cleaner water. Of course trying not to stir up any extra muck as you do this. A rubber band to hold
the inlet to a tent stake (or stick) out in clear water works fine also.

I know from experience that a cartridge filter can be completely blocked in one day if the water inlet gets to close to the bottom while filtering drinking water.
I like stuff like that. Great idea. I carry some bread sack ties with me to wrap around my hiking pole and secure my inlet hose. Then just stick the pole tip in the creek bed and it holds the inlet about the bottom and keeps hose from floating down stream.
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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Dubbya » Mon Nov 05, 2012 11:32 am

TAD Gear Litespeed

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Tevo » Thu Dec 27, 2012 11:37 am

It's been a while since I posted...so long I forgot my username even. So I'm sort of new again. :awesome: anyways, just wanted to share my experience this past week with the US military surplus magnesium snowshoes procured online for around $30 with bindings.

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Overall, I'm very pleased. I took them out and spent three hours hiking cross country in deep snow, shallow snow, powdery snow, and crust...up hills and down. I tried to put them through a real world bug out scenario in winter so I wore a heavy pack during all of it. Flotation was great and they cleared snow really well.

The only real downsides was navigating steep hills with a crusty layer on top that got a bit slippery. The crampons on these really are just a few jagged edges an inch or two long on the bottom and I found them a bit slippery. I've read of people that sharpen them up and maybe I'll try it. Also, they are BIG...it's great from the perspective of being able to carry a lot of weight, but sometimes navigating tight spots can be tough.

The bindings concerned me a bit because I read online lots of people saying they were terrible. I didn't have a problem with them slipping at all. I did find that pushing down hard on the cam buckles really locked them in place, so if you get slippage that may help.

Oh, mine were manufactured in 1977. The magnesium and steel lacing are in amazing shape and really says something about how durable they are. Plus I suppose in a pinch the magnesium could be shaved off to aid in firestarting, but I try to carry a good fire kit before wrecking my gear.

Very good product for the price. Cheap enough to buy multiple pairs for your vehicle and home if you're in a cold part of the world.

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by bacpacjac » Sat Jan 05, 2013 6:47 pm

Testing out my new GSI Tea Kettle and Pocket Esbit Stove, by making some raman noodles in the snow:

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After First Use:


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“This is the part in the movie where that guy says, "Zombies? What zombies?" just before they eat his brains. I don't want to be that guy.” ― Holly Black, Kin

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by thumper » Thu Jan 31, 2013 8:17 pm

Home made shelter that served me well this year.

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8.5' tall and 15' from front to back.
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Plenty of room for 6'4" people to stand up
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Internal features
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Cannopy next to size 15s
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Canopy and stuff sack
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Canopy with stakes and wood stove weighed in at 9lbs.
My old mountaineering tent weighed 13lbs... and no heat.

--thumper

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Fortitudine » Sun Feb 10, 2013 3:57 am

I purchased a Solo Stove, wood gasifier type, from Amazon and just tested it out.

Overall, I am very satisfied with the purchase. The stove is lightweight, compact, solid construction/stainless steel and functionally excellent. I absolutely love that it is only two pieces and that the pot holder nests in the stove. Now, my test was less than ideal, because it was quite windy and i didn't have anything but a landscaping wall to shield it from one side. Also, the only fuel I used was oak bark and shavings which I made while stripping a staff for a walking stick. Yes, I was too lazy to wander into the woods and gather tinder in the cold and dark. The problem with the shavings is that they burn through so quickly that once the stove starts gasifying the wood (you can see immediately because high flames start pouring from the inner holes of the stove) it didn't last long before needing more fuel, which reduces heat before it resumes gasifying.

Even with the fuel and wind problems, I boiled about a quart of water in 12 minutes. There is not a doubt in my mind that I could boil the same quantity in 7 or 8 minutes with proper fuel, even in the wind.

I had considered building one of these, but a shotty tin can stove that rusts breaks down over time didn't seem worth the effort. Bottom line, it was completely worth the $69 on Amazon and I would recommend it to anyone. After helping me test the stove, my brother-in-law decided to buy one despite the price.
Last edited by Fortitudine on Tue May 28, 2013 11:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Manliest » Wed Feb 20, 2013 9:46 pm

Day/day-and-a-half pack. [img]http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/02/21/tyzeva7u.jpg[/img]]
I hate it, but I hate all packs. Got it set up like an ALICE, with a horizontal utility behind the shovel blade.
The shovel serves mostly as a big choppy thing, I'm considering replacing it and my Mora with a Tracker style knife.

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by SkidvonArk » Mon Mar 04, 2013 3:30 pm

Got to do a three day mock bug out type deal. Image Backyard testing of my system before heading out to the backwoods. It rained and snowed and sleeted pretty much 24/7 all three days... It was a bit difficult to stay warm and dry but I managed lol Here's some ice built up on my tarp Image Image
Starting to look like a winter wonderland :clap:
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My water source... I used a MSR Autoflow gravity filter and had some Aquamira drops as back up. Had to take the filter into the hammock with me to keep it from freezing... Image
A beautiful morning with coffee from the hammock :awesome: Image
Another snowy pic. It was definitely a fun time out in the woods :clap:
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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by Mikeyboy » Fri Mar 15, 2013 12:44 pm

SkidvonArk, Is that underquilt store bought, or did you make it yourself?

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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by SkidvonArk » Fri Mar 15, 2013 7:12 pm

I got my underquilt from hammockgear.com. Quality is top notch, well worth the wait IMO... Adam does good work (though I may just be biased since we share first names :awesome: ) It kept me warm and toasty the whole trip, though temps only got into the mid 20s so nothing terribly brutal...

On topic.
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Re: Your Gear in Action. Field Pics and Reviews Only.

Post by HCH » Wed Mar 20, 2013 2:24 pm

Floated the river and got into land locked public hunting ground this way. The Golite SL-5 performed flawlessly, as well as my DIY cylinder stove.

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Day hike on the North Hampshire Downs, 7th April 2013

Post by sheddi » Sun Apr 07, 2013 4:43 pm

Finding myself unexpectedly free today, I decided to head out into the hills (the North Hampshire Downs) for a bit of a hike. There was this route I'd spotted on the map a while back and I'd been waiting for the opportunity to give it a go. It looked to be ~11 miles of farm tracks, bridleways and footpaths, and since the more local paths were getting a bit too familiar I decided to strike out and see what it was like.

The weather was dry, in the high-single-figures Celsius (so about 45F). There was a fair bit of high cloud so when the sun did manage to put in an appearance it was weak, and there was a brisk southerly wind blowing (it did drop off as the day went on).

The route was circular, and the plan was to head out, break for lunch at the halfway point, then head on back. I took my EDC with me (see the link in my sig). It's moved on a little since then (I must update that thread), but fundamentally it's as it was although I ditched the ice-cream tub of stuff to make room in my pack for my basha (tarp), a litre of water, fleece hat and gloves. I supplemented this with my brewkit, suitably enhanced for the day. Strapped to the outside was my fleece jacket, wrapped in my ex-mil BW goretex shell (in case of [unforecast] rain).

I was wearing shorts and a t-shirt, wool socks and my newish walking shoes (I'd probably put less than 50 miles on the shoes before this walk). On my head was my bush hat, as a precaution against the sun (after the winter we've had my pallor is akin to that of a cave-dwelling fish). I had my cellphone in one pocket, my Victorinox Farmer SAK in another, and my camera in a pouch on my trouser belt.

Weights: my EDC pack with the additions and substitutions came in at 6.8kg / 15lbs, the brew kit in its case with the canteen filled was 4.2kg / 9 lbs.

I also took my walking poles, which I carried in my hands without using at any stage during the walk.

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Top step, left to right: water purification tabs (just in case), sugar packets, gum, vegetable bouillon, 2004-vintage instant white tea, lifeboat matches, coffee powder & whitener, KFS set.
Bottom step, left to right: (formerly) moist wipes, ex-mil SE Trangia set, "biscuits, fruit" x2, tissues, rice & meatballs (ie. lunch).

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All the stuff from the last photo packed into a ex-mil UK respirator case & belt, ex-mil BW canteen & cup, disposable lighter (goes in side pocket of respirator case).

And off we go. It was after 1pm before I got underway, so lunch was going to be late.

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Quarter of a mile or so from home and I leave the blacktop. Ahead is a typical farm track.

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Despite it being early spring, there's enough woody growth and evergreens that the hedgerows here are still thick.

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More scenery porn. The farm on the ridge (you can see it if you know it's there :) ) is the site of the next photo ...

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... of bucolic bliss (although maybe that's just the country boy in me showing through).

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The paths and trails around here are pretty well marked and well used, which means they get a bit chewed up in wet weather. Fortunately The Downs are chalk heath, so they drain well. This was as bad as it ever got; last week it would have been a quagmire, now it's just a bit lumpy underfoot.

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There were many little feathery patches on the walk to show where the food chain had been in action, but this one in particular reminded me of a scene from Terry Gilliam's it's-not-a-Python-movie-honest Jabberwocky. Some feathered creature became a meal for something else here. (I'm guessing it was formerly a red-legged partridge, but does anyone have any better ideas?)

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A fine example of rural English waymarking.

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Despite this having been the coldest start to a year here for absolutely ages, spring was doing its best to, er, spring forth. I spotted this little primrose at the side of the path and had to snap a photo of it.

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My lunch spot, a patch of mixed woodland just off the path.

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Getting a brew on :)

While waiting for everything to heat up, I by comparison started getting cold. Walking I'd been plenty warm enough in shorts & t-shirt, but standing around was a different matter. I put my fleece jacket on but should probably have gone for hat & gloves too. And possibly the goretex shell to keep the wind out.

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Mmm, meatballs and rice. Tasty! (Although the pouches could've done with a few more minutes in the boiling water; it wasn't quite as hot as I'd have liked and by the time I finished it had become pretty tepid.)

I followed this up with a big half-litre BW cup of instant coffee.

When packing things up after lunch my Trangia burner slipped through my cold fingers and I ended up scattering warm meths around the wood and over my leg. Nice.

I set off after lunch feeling rather cold, and kept my fleece on for the first mile. By then I was getting too hot so I took it off, and didn't need it again for the rest of the hike.

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Back on the trail again. The landowner here is planting a new wood, which will no doubt be very pleasant in 20 years or so.

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Not far from my destination and this is the view down off The Downs. The photo doesn't quite do it justice; the ground in front is falling away at a slope of about 1-in-4 and the horizon is around 20 miles away.

And that was about it.

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I've recently taken to using Runkeeper on my Android phone to keep track (metaphorically and literally) of my hikes. The distance was just shy of 11 miles. The time spent walking of just over 3 hrs doesn't include the ~40 minutes I spent having lunch. My average pace of 10:23./km is equivalent to 3.6 miles per hour, which I don't consider too shabby given my current fitness level.

One thing I really like about Runkeeper (and YMMV on this) is that every five minutes it tells me how long I've been walking for, how far I've gone and what my average pace is. I find this really keeps me focussed on staying on the move, and (on a pre-planned route) lets me judge fairly accurately how far I've gone and have left to go. Today it was also my guide to when to stop for lunch.

After arriving home I discovered I had gained peanut-sized blisters on the side of both big toes, something I've not got previously with these shoes & socks. Previous trips have however been 4 - 5 miles not 11, which may have something to do with it!

As well as a good afternoon out on the hills, I did learn a couple of lessons (which on reflection I'm sure I knew before):

1. Regardless of how warm you are when walking, you will cool down when you stop. So wrap up before you get cold.
2. Lunch that takes 10 minutes to warm through at home on the stove will take longer than that on the trail.
3. Pay attention to your feet. If I'd inspected them at the lunch stop I might have spotted the pressure points and could have applied tape or dressings to mitigate the blisters.

That's about it for now, hope you like the report and enjoy the photos!
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