ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sun Aug 16, 2009 9:41 pm

B.O.B. Communication (part 1)

Here are a couple ideas for the communication aspects of your BOB. Having a set of 2-way radios are a great idea for short range communication. I use the Motorola FV150, 22 channel, 8-mile range 2-way radio set, I modified them by adding a micro ear plug to each one. They now work with an ear piece for covert listening. The neat things about these radios are their size, they are very small and cheap, and they use 3-AAA batteries which my solar charging system. (6.21"x2.14"x1.15")

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I also use an ICOM IC-T7H Sport Transceiver for long range, more dependable, communication. This transceiver is sold with some frequencies blocked to not allow it to transmit on the restricted EMS, FIRE and Law Enforcement frequencies. With an easy modification, mine is now able to transmit on the previously blocked frequencies to be used only for a true emergency. This transceiver will transmit and receive from 144-148 MHz (HAM) and 440-450 MHz, work on the above Motorola FV150 radio frequencies and uses an AA battery pack. I also carry a small laminated card with frequency programming instructions and a list of frequencies.

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:13 pm

B.O.B. Signal

When it comes to a signaling device the Greatland Rescue Laser Flare is a pretty cool item. I’ve got one of these, it works great, but not just for not an aerial "overt" signal but also for a person to person "covert" night-time signal.

http://www.bestglide.com/rescue_laser_flare.html

Unlike the Greatland Rescue Laser Flare, other emergency signaling devices are flammable, hazardous and only provide a short amount of signaling capability. You can't fly with them on a commercial airplane or refuel a boat. Worst of all, it is possible to injure yourself or set a forest fire when lighting a pyrotechnic flare. Greatland Rescue Laser Flares are a compact, safe, effective alternative that can last a lifetime - all you have to do is replace the battery!

Flares last a few minutes then expire. Rescue Lasers operate for hours before needing to replace the battery. The laser diode itself has a 10,000 hour meantime life. That is more than 400, 24 hour days of use!

A Rescue Laser Light can be seen 20 miles away at night, ground to air, and 2-3 miles during the daytime. While pyrotechnic flares are visible at long distances, their short duration make it difficult for rescuers to determine the source of the signal.

Greatland Rescue Laser Flares are waterproof to 80 feet (24 meters) and are anodized for improved corrosion resistance. These Laser Flares are small, effective and durable, which are important qualities when it comes to choosing quality survival equipment. They have a multi-purpose - use it for rescue signaling, finding reflective materials or a limited light.

Size - 3.125" Long - 40 Hours on 1 battery, Red Laser, CR123 Lithium Battery.

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Tue Aug 18, 2009 8:01 pm

B.O.B. Flashlight (part 1)

When it comes to your utility flashlight choice, look at the multi use aspect. I decided on the Streamlight Sidewinder IR LED flashlight for its numerous uses. Not only does the flashlight have multi colored LEDs, it has an IR (infrared) LED, which works with my NVG (Night Vision Goggles). The IR LED strobe feature can also be used as a “covert” signaling device. It also runs on “AA” batteries, which works with my “AA” solar rechargeable battery system.

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The Sidewinder has twenty light functions, four selectable LED light colors and intensity levels, plus strobe, it is also lightweight and waterproof. The Sidewinder has more than 100-hours of runtime with any LED color at low intensity. At full-power, the Sidewinder has runtimes of between 7 and 12 hours, depending on LED selection.
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Wed Aug 19, 2009 8:49 pm

B.O.B. Map (part 1)

I got this idea from when I attended US Army Special Forces SERE school at Ft. Bragg, NC. The DOD produces an "EVC" (Evasion Chart) for High-Risk military personnel. It has all needed information for survival, evasion, etc......

Hopefully this is some helpful information when putting together a map for your BOB. You should have a complete map of all your routes from work to home and of your primary and alternate BOR (Bug Out Route).

Something to keep in mind when planning your routes is that when a catastrophe occurs most people stick with what they know. After 9/11 many people walked home by walking down the same highways they drove to work everyday and crossed the rivers on the same highway bridges. Because they had no other plan they clogged all the primary routes out of the city. What if the terrorists would have also taken out all the bridges and caused an even bigger problem?

Your route planning should include alternate roadway travel, alternate off-road travel and covert travel. Some are asking why you would need covert travel routes. The routes are necessary for any covert travel, for that worse case scenario, when people are actively looking for you. You should plan for at least the following routes and make practice trips, travel then in both day and night and both summer and winter. I purchased a good quality TOPO map and hand charted the other routes on the map, and then laminated it. Before I laminated it, I wrote extra travel information on the back of the map. I wrote basic survival information, which helps you to keep thinking straight during a time of stress, bus time tables, taxi phone numbers, etc…………

The map should include;

• Daily Traveled Work Route; your normal route to work
• Primary Alternate Roads (paved); your alternate vehicle travel route
• Secondary Roads (gravel or dirt); a back-up vehicle travel route
• TOPO map MGRS/UTM for compass or GPS use (terrain and waterways); a planned foot travel route
• Train Tracks (bridges across the rivers); for alternate foot travel
• River and Streams (covert); for foot travel
• Water Crossing Plans(boat and bridge locations); alternate ways to cross the water
• Water Drainage Canals (easier foot travel); for foot travel
• Storm Water Drainage Systems (covert travel); for foot travel
• Bus and Taxi Schedules; alternate travel
• Cache and Hold-up Locations; your preplanned locations
• Possible Supply Locations; hardware, outdoor and gun stores

Tomorrow, when you drive to work, start looking and thinking of these alternate routes and plans.

**** I'll talk more about how to make your own EVC Map later ****
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sat Aug 22, 2009 12:17 pm

B.O.B. Map (part 2)

The DOD EVC uses a 1:250,000 JOG map scale on a UTM/MGRS layout. The EVC is printed on tear resistant Tyvek material with a subdued colored waterproof ink for evasion purposes. The EVC has native and natural information from the geographical location of the map. The EVC also has basic survival techniques as well as information including wind speeds, directions and water currents.

You can make your own B.O.B. version of the EVC. You are not limited to only one map, make one for each area of operation.

Step 1; Buy some waterproof paper, sometimes called Adventure Paper, it comes in 8.5”x11” and 11”x17” sizes, prints on both sides, works in either Inkjet or Laser printers.

http://www.waterproof-paper.com/

Step 2; Download (free) and print a colored TOPO UTM/MGRS map and map legend of your desired area on one side of the waterproof paper.

http://www.mytopo.com/online-maps.cfm

Step 3; Add additional information on the back side of the map. Information can include; survival tecniques, sunrise, sunset, stars, phone numbers(emergency, friends and businesses), radio frequencies, special equipment instructions, poisonous plants and insects, first-aid, bug-out locations, resupply locations, possible supply items, bus, train and taxi scheduling information, etc……. The information can either be digitally added or hand drawn on the back of the map. To avoid any security concerns, sensitive information and be coded with a simple cipher so only you can decipher it.

The neat thing about this waterproof map paper is that you can write on it over the printed TOPO map area, so you can map your own routes.

The following image is of a real DOD EVC
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Bluesman » Sat Aug 22, 2009 2:35 pm

Great stuff! Please give us moar!
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sun Aug 23, 2009 2:45 pm

B.O.B. Communication (part 2)

Most people already know that every well prepared B.O.B. needs a good radio to monitor the airwaves in time of crisis. When it comes to quality and that all important B.O.B. space, try the Grundig M300P Mini300 Handheld AM/FM/SW Radio, it’s a good little radio. The M300P receiver working with the ICOM transceiver and Motorola walkie/talkies, which I talked about in a previous post, will give you a very wide range of receiving and transmitting possibilities. With this combination you’ll be able to monitor; AM/FM/SW(7 channels)/HAM/ FRS/GMRS/Weather Chasers/Park Rangers/Marine/Police/Fire/EMS and more, in most areas. The radio is small (2.5” x 1” x 4.5”) and works on two “AA” batteries, which works with my solar battery recharging system.

http://shop.nationalgeographic.com/product/1001191/2484/136.html

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:18 pm

B.O.B. Communication (part 3)

Field Expedient Long Range External Antenna

A simple and inexpensive piece of commo equipment to improve your radio performance is an external antenna. Anyone who has ever listened to the radio knows that your location determines how well you receive the broadcast. Most people know that if your portable radio has poor reception, you move the radio to another place or move the antenna around. In a crisis, when your local stations are not broadcasting, an external antenna will help you receive the more distant stations.

There are some things to remember when it comes to radio signal strength in your area. Some strong daytime stations have reduced power night-time broadcasts and some stations have small transmitters. The frequency matters and the station's spot on the dial matters, too. Signals at the low end of the dial (down towards 540) broadcast better than signals at the high end of the dial (up around 1600). Therefore, even if two stations are located in the same area, and have equally good antennas, the station at the low end of the dial will cover a greater area. Be aware of obstructions between you and the transmitter. An obstruction such as a mountain, tall buildings, any electronic interference or the construction of the building you are in can sometimes block the signal.

One of the simplest multiband antennas for shortwave listening is the long-wire antenna. It is literally, a random long length of wire stretched out from the shortwave receiver antenna connection and attached with some form of an insulator on the opposite end. No bells or whistles and usually very easy to do. Your shortwave radio probably has either a short telescoping (pull-up) antenna and or a connection point for an external antenna usually on the rear. A very simple method of drastically increasing the signal strength to your shortwave radio is to simply add about 50 to 70 feet or more of either insulated or un-insulated wire of small diameter, (size not critical, it must support it's own weight), attached to either the telescoping antenna with an alligator clip or a suitable connector to the rear external antenna connection and stringing it out across or from the house to the appropriate support, horizontal, as high as possible on each end with some form of insulator along the entire length, (a non-metal device that will not pass electricity). In other words, don't run it along a water pipe, conduit, metal house siding, rain gutters, etc. It can be tacked along the ceiling or snaked up into the attic or around the roof, just don't run it close to metal.

The image is of a spool of wire with an alligator clip attached to be used as an antenna
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Mon Aug 24, 2009 7:35 pm

B.O.B. Fishing Equipment

A properly packed B.O.B. should carry enough food for about three days. You should also have a plan for a reliable long term survival food source, one of the many options is fishing. Most people carry some type of fishing items in their B.O.B. Some people choose to carry a break down fishing pole, but making room in your pack can be trying. Other people will carry a mini tackle and some fish line to tie to the end of a pole. A better solution I found was buying a mini fishing reel from Bass Pro Shops “Uncle Bucks”, there are different styles to choose from, for around $10, and they weigh only 4 ounces. I also carry a few hooks, sinkers and a bobber. I carry two stainless steel hose clamps to attach the reel to a pole/stick. I also carry a two stainless steel eye screws for the line guides, I use one halfway up the pole/stick and the other one at the end of a pole. Having a fishing reel as an alternative to a string at the end of the pole/stick allows you to have an easier, less stressful fishing experience. Less stress is a very important thing during a crisis.

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_16504_100001004_100000000_100001000?cmCat=CROSSSELL_SEARCH

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Another item I carry is the IMPS-NET COMBAT & SURVIVAL NET, it’s a basic net type hammock that has a size of 6’x10’, and weighs only 9 ounces. It is a multi-use item with many uses including a fishing net.

http://www.brigadeqm.com/cgi-bin/tame.exe/store/level4c.tam?M5COPY.ctx=7824&M5.ctx=7824

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Tue Aug 25, 2009 7:48 pm

B.O.B. Training and Fitness (part 2)

As I talked about in (part 1) it is very important to be aware your fitness level when choosing your BOB pack size and the weight of your equipment. As GUNNY said, there is no perfect BOB, there is only a BOB that works for you, that is a very true statement.

You need to have a Bug Out Plan (BOP) that works with your BOB. GUNNY has done a very good job of outlining BOB equipment. But remember, it does you no good to have equipment if you’re unable to carry it when your BOP changes. A good BOP should be flexible, if your only plan for bugging out is to drive a Bug Out Vehicle (BOV) it’s great, until you come across a river that you need to across or it breaks down and you can’t fix it. With a flexible BOP you’ll be able to shift gears and travel by foot. But if your plan is to travel by foot, you need to know your limits.

For everyone who has their BOB packed and ready to go, how many of you have really trained with it? By trained I mean, hiked on varying and different terrains for 10 miles in a day or night, wearing boots?

Think of it this way; for the most part, athletes train for an event, by practicing the same event. Training for bugging out with a BOB is basically the same thing. Just because you run five miles a day (if you can, good for you), doesn’t mean you can hike across country with a 40 pound rucksack in boots. Of course, you would be in much better shape then a couch potato, but each exercise uses a different muscle group. You will also find out if your rucksack or boots cause blisters and how to deal with it. I’m not trying to tell you that I’m a fitness junkie by any means, I try to keep myself in good shape, but I get busy at work or lazy like the next guy.

When I served in the 82nd Airborne Division at Ft. Bragg, NC, we exercised a lot (an awful lot). One of the reasons was to strengthen our legs, knees and ankles, so we weren’t injured during Airborne jumps. We did long distant running as well as rucksack marches (runs) on the concrete roads as well as on sand and gravel roads, there is a big difference between the two. We found out very quickly what caused blisters and equipment changes we needed to make before for the next time. If you have never trained, you will never find out what changes you need to make until you actually bug out, then it’s too late to fix the problem.

Try this; pack you BOB pack with 30 pounds of some type of weight (weights, sandbag, concrete blocks, etc…), then try walking a mile or two. This will let you know what kind of shape you’re in. After you’re comfortable with the distance, increase the weight, distances, terrain types and weather conditions, until you know what you can handle.
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Lambykins » Thu Aug 27, 2009 6:48 pm

This is a most excellent thread!
I am re-doing my B.O.B. and other bags this month and this has given me so many good ideas!
It has also helped me see the mistakes I made in some of my bags that I will have to redo!
Thanks!
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by ZMace » Thu Aug 27, 2009 7:03 pm

Great write up, thanks!
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Thu Aug 27, 2009 8:27 pm

B.O.B. Undamaged and Dry Items

A couple things I learned the hard way, in the military, was to keep items in my ruckpack undamaged and dry. While serving with the 82nd Airborne Division I quickly learned that when parachuting, sometimes the landing were hard. After a couple broken things, I started packing everything I didn’t won’t broken into crushproof containers for those hard landings. When it came to keeping my items dry, I would use smaller zip-loc bags and then a bigger waterproof bag, for that double protection. Even if an item didn’t need to be weather protected, I would put it in the bigger waterproof bag anyway. The bigger bag added extra buoyancy while doing water crossings during field exercises.

Another handy thing I learned was to place items in my rucksack so I could find the items in the dark without using a flashlight. The reason for not using a flashlight would be for not giving your position away at night, during those covert occasions.

These are good tips to keep in mind when building your BOB.
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Fri Aug 28, 2009 10:54 am

B.O.B. Surveillance Equipment

Some may be asking themselves why you would need this equipment. Anyone who is planning for a bug-out scenario needs both day and night enhanced vision capabilities. If you're traveling, in not so friendly areas, you’ll have an edge over the bad guys. Imagine, it’s the end of your day’s travel by yourself, you set up your sleepsite and position your perimeter security alarms, which I talked about in an earlier post, and you're awoken in the middle of the night. You have a decision to make, turn on your flashlight and give away your position or use your Night Vision to maneuver around the bad guys and take them out, before they take you out. Additionally both your daytime and nighttime travels can be made easier and safer with this equipment. Night Vision is also an added plus for covert nighttime traveling. My personal Night Vision Monocular runs on “AA” batteries which work with my solar battery recharging system.

A Daytime Mini-Monocular is very small and can be bought at any Wal-Mart for under $20. Night Vision (Gen1) has become very reasonable in recent years and can be bought at larger outdoor stores or on-line for around $250.


Daytime Mini-Monocular
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Night Vision Monocular
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sat Aug 29, 2009 12:03 pm

B.O.B. Clothes and Traveling (part 1)

Some go full Camo and some do not, what’s right for you?

Here is something to consider when choosing the clothes for your BOB, this is where your BOP comes into play. Is your BOP (remember you should also have an alternate) urban or woodland? If you chose Camo clothing, you have to think about any possible changes in your BOP that may take you into an urban area, if so you’ll stick out. It also works the other way, if you chose bright colored clothes, they won’t hide you very well in the woods.

Something else to consider is your weapon choice. May people chose an assault rifle as a defensive weapon, I think that’s a very good idea. However, there are a couple things to remember; if you plan to carry a lot of bigger bullets that means added weight to your BOB, also have a plan to conceal your rifle if you have to travel through a populated urban area. When you travel you need to think about how you blend into your surroundings, either wooded or urban. If you stand out you are making yourself a target. If people see you have things that they want they will follow you until your guard is down and take it from you.
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sat Aug 29, 2009 1:35 pm

B.O.B. Clothes and Traveling (part2)

After choosing you color combination, next look at the material. Cotton clothes are comfortable, but take a long time to dry when wet and while the material is wet, it’s heavy. Look at the nylon mixed materials, they are comfortable and dry a lot faster and even when the material is wet is not as heavy. They also weigh less and pack smaller. In the military we learned that the long sleeve shirts we wore over our t-shirts helped with weather exposure and offered a layer of skin protection, they can also be rolled up for comfort. Some outdoor pants have zip-off legs, so they can be worn as shorts for water crossings. Additionally carry at least 2 pairs of; socks, t-shirts and underwear. The reason is that one pair can be worn as the other pair is washed and dried.

When it comes to your feet, take good care of them, with out them you won’t travel far. Again it's your choice, but I chose boots over shoes for the ankle support. I also chose boots for their wet weather drying abilities. I wore military jungle boots for many years, because they were light weight and dried fast. I recently bought black OTB Boots, they’re light weight, comfortable and dry fast. They’re made to be worn in the water while scuba diving, so they will work great for foot protection during water crossings.


Long Sleeve Shirt
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Zip-Off Leg Pants
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sat Aug 29, 2009 6:01 pm

B.O.B. Flashlight (part 2)

When it comes to a good tactical/shooting flashlight, look at how it functions with your guns. I decided on the Gladius Night-Ops it has a user friendly locking tail cap switch with three modes, Steady-on, Momentary and Strobe. The Strobe feature works well for gaining a tactical advantage, by disorienting the bad guy. It has a very bright light, it is waterproof and mine also came with a belt case holder. It run on two CR123A 3-volt batteries, I upgraded my solar rechargeable battery system to include a 12 volt plug-in two battery 3-volt battery charger, which also works with my Signal Laser Flare, which I talked about in another post.

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sun Aug 30, 2009 9:11 pm

B.O.B. Flashlight (part 3)

I’ve seen some people with those little cheap keychain lights. While they are cheap, they are also easily breakable and not waterproof. There is one that cost a little more, at around $20, it’s the Photon Freedom Micro. They cost a little more, but they also do a little more. They are made a little tougher, they’re waterproof, it has a bright to dimming light feature as well as a strobe feature. I carry two of these, one, a white light for my Survival Necklace to be used as a light and strobe signal, the other, an IR light, I use it as an IR strobe feature for marking things to later come back to, I use it with my NVG (night vision goggles). I also carry a couple extra coin batteries for each one. Here are a couple uses;

Scenario 1; it’s dark, you leave your camp site area and need to mark a trail to find it later, turn the IR strobe on and place it at the trails end.

Scenario 2; it’s dark, you’re on your covert bug out route, you have to leave your BOB in a temporary wooded cache while you check for a safe road crossing. You leave your BOB with the IR strobe, you take your NVG to assist in the road recon, then use your NVG to relocate your BOB.

One thing to remember when using IR lights, is that anyone else with NVG can also see the light.

http://www.photonlight.com/Photon-Freedom-Micro-Keychain-LED-Flashlights-p/fm-led-keychain-flashlight.htm

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Chef » Tue Sep 01, 2009 7:55 am

Good stuff, Recondo. 8)

I got a Gladius when they were the hot new ticket. I lost it, I miss it. I replaced it with a Fenix AA unit that also has adjustable brightness and strobe. It's also much lighter, uses more easily available batteries, and costs about a quarter of the Gladius. It might not be quite as rugged, but I think the other attributes make up for that. I haven't immersed it in saltwater yet (my experiments showed that the Gladius does fine in the ocean, BTW).

I've been really curious about the OTB Odhins since I read about them on Military Moron's site a little over a year ago. I've relied on the good old GI jungle boot since I was a kid, and have two well-broken-in pairs (both are Wellco and not a lesser licensee), but the Odhins really piqued my curiosity. An in-depth review would be much appreciated.

I keep a few of the Photon MicroLites handy on small loops of paracord on the left straps of various rucks and rigs. Since I don't have NV capability, I went with the blue ones over IR. I've had a hard-on for those little buggers ever since they came on the market and to this day I haven't found a mini-LED I like better.
Orville Wright did not have a pilot's license.

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by BurtGummer » Wed Sep 30, 2009 11:48 am

Gunny wrote:Nalgene Bottles...........

High impact resistance
Resistant to staining
Won't retain odors

Withstands sub-freezing to boiling temperatures
Dishwasher safe away from the heating element
Max temperature: 135°C/275°F
Min temperature: -135°C/-211°F



Unfortunately I've personally had these containers retain odor and can break. I usually use a nalgene for my post-workout protein shake, and if I don't wash it out immediately afterward (ie: leave a few drips of protein shake left in it for a few hours) then the container smells godawful the next day despite being washed out that day. If I fill it with water the water tastes and smells nasty. I've resorted to using empty gatorade bottles for protein shakes instead of the nalgene.

Also, if you throw or drop a half-full nalgene on concrete or rocks it'll crack right open. I dropped mine off a 20 foot bridge onto a dry streambed while hiking and it was a goner. I carry a steel US GI canteen for the outdoors now.

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by jak » Fri Oct 30, 2009 5:10 am

BurtGummer wrote:
Gunny wrote:Nalgene Bottles...........



Unfortunately I've personally had these containers retain odor and can break. I usually use a nalgene for my post-workout protein shake, and if I don't wash it out immediately afterward (ie: leave a few drips of protein shake left in it for a few hours) then the container smells godawful the next day despite being washed out that day. If I fill it with water the water tastes and smells nasty. I've resorted to using empty gatorade bottles for protein shakes instead of the nalgene.

Also, if you throw or drop a half-full nalgene on concrete or rocks it'll crack right open. I dropped mine off a 20 foot bridge onto a dry streambed while hiking and it was a goner. I carry a steel US GI canteen for the outdoors now.


Protein Shake mix is like adding paint to your water, the very nature of protein (cake) mixes is to be gluey and sticky and filmy. They cling to shit like... well.. shit. Any container would smell godawful with that in there. Stick to water for the nalgene.

As for dropping it 20 friggin feet and having it break, well I just gotta say thats surprising :roll: "High Impact Resistance", not friggin titanium composite. It's a plastic bottle for poops sake.
Nalgenes most useful aspect is that the harder plastic makes it easier to clean and keep clean, harder more abrassive solvents/and or water, won't score the plastic or produce pitting as easily/quickly. Making it much safer to carrying your drinking water in. I (210lb guy, more hard than soft I would say :lol: )fell down the side of a trail and landed on my Nalgene from about six feet. No damage to the bottle at all. Left me with a nice shiner though.

Great articles Recondo, keep up the good work, it's nice to hear some unique perspectives.

--Jak
"The rain it raineth on the just, And also on the unjust fella; But chiefly on the just, because The unjust steals the just's umbrella."
- Lord Bowen

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by dasneal » Fri Oct 30, 2009 9:35 am

Recondo,
Great information. You should consider writing a book...lord knows I have paid for much lower quality survival and preparedness writing!
If the wolf is the natural predator to animals then surely desperate men are the wolves of other men. The rule of law, the goal of civilization, is to discipline the bestial nature within us.

Those who prepare for emergencies are building the rule of law. Do not confuse us with those who seek the wolf or who view mankind as their prey.

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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by sarky » Sun Nov 01, 2009 5:28 pm

I noticed that most of the bags(if not all) were top load . I personally prefer a panel load bag because I can lay it down open the panel and I have acess to everything without having to pull it all out or dig around. My pack of choice is the Kifaru Navigator with an E&E pack "docked and locked" to it.
As to fishing, since all i use are trot lines (very efficient), i use a fly reel to hold my line (65lb test Spyder Wire) as the fly reel is more compact than any casting reel of the same capacity.
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Re: ZS Presents: How to Build Your Bug Out Bag (B.O.B.)

Post by Recondo » Sun Nov 01, 2009 9:39 pm

Hey Sarky, Glad to see another SERE guy here.
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