It is currently Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:20 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 64 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:13 pm 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:27 pm
Posts: 4096
Location: Arizona, where the plants try to kill you and the sun tries to boil you alive
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 3 times
LakotaJones, sorry for the oversight. I've added Texas. :)

MJS8725, thanks for adding your link. :)

toecutter, thanks for sharing your info. :)

_________________
status update: Y.T. has not been eaten by zombies. She's busy in the analog world.
JOIN THE ARIZONA CHAPTER!!
desert folks links/tips * ZS Wiki * beginner help & other links * women's PAW health
Anyone can use my Unofficial Welcome Wagon(TM) message, no need to give credit or thanks if you do. :)


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 7:12 pm 
Offline
* * *
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 2:47 am
Posts: 540
Location: Las Vegas
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
roscoe wrote:
I have see plenty of pictures of a solar still, but Colin Fletcher pointed out that you might lose plenty of water chopping up cactus and building a still.



I agree i would think that would be something you would do when you first find a decent spot to set up a camp for an extended amount of time. You could make a few while you still have a good water supply available. So hopefully by the time you use up the supply you have you have a couple different ones working to replenish your supply.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 6:12 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 2:10 am
Posts: 1767
Location: ZSC: Fo-Tay! Making the dead sit still in the 504!
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 4 times
A big, huge +1 on having sunglasses, to the point where I'd suggest carrying a spare set. It's a lesson I've learned the hard way.

Easter weekend, 1989: I'm on a cross-country ski camping trip in the Sangre de Christos up near Truchas Peaks with the Outdoor Recreation Club (Yes, we were ORCs, and proud of it!) of the college I was attending in North-Central New Mexico. So. Pristine white snow, crystal-clear New Mexican skies, above 9,000' all weekend, and my shades got crushed during the van ride to the trail head. No one had a spare set, no place in Podunk, NM to buy a replacement, and one of the other folks on the trip was a hot coed, so I wasn't about to make a set of Devo goggles out of treebark. As a result of this stupidity, I managed to sunburn my eyes. Not my eyelids, mind you... I didn't go snowblind, but had the trip lasted longer, I would have. The whites of my eyes were solid red. I looked like a Fremen with a massive hangover. To this day, my eyes are always somewhat bloodshot. Had it been a SHTF situation, I would have been well & truly FUBARed.

_________________
“There are only two ways to sleep well at night, be ignorant or be prepared” – Simon Black

Readiness is all. — William Shakespeare

Senectute Et Perfidia


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:21 am 
Offline
* * *
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 5:34 am
Posts: 542
Location: Texas
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 0 time
While I would not consider it desert-specific by any means, my meager EDC can be found HERE.

ETA: Great information posted by all, by the by.

_________________
Taf's EDC
No longer in California but still a Cali boy at heart.
ImageImage


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 2:18 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 8:17 pm
Posts: 6915
Location: Bensalem, PA
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 18 times
Added an My EDC/Manpurse link to the rest of my info on the first page.

_________________
-NREMT - EMT
-NFPA 1006 Rescue Technician
-Instructor AHA BLS for HCP CPR & AED

My Aid Bag
*Standard medical disclaimer applies to all of my posts, YMMV, Always check CNS before and after, never let the new guy drive, don't attempt anything you read here without proper supervision..... Blah Blah Blah*


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 3:54 pm 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:27 pm
Posts: 4096
Location: Arizona, where the plants try to kill you and the sun tries to boil you alive
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 3 times
dust hygiene

This came up in thread about waterproofing and Gingersam asked what it was. I figured this would be the appropriate place to discuss it. :)

I don't know if this is a common term, it's one that came up in discussions on preparing for the Burning Man festival. The festival is not only held in the desert, but on a dry lake bed which means dust is a significant factor in dealing with the environment. "Dust hygiene" is basically used to describe the behavioral changes and tips employed to minimize the amount of dust accumulated in your gear and tent.


1) Keep tent windows and doors zipped when you're not in the tent.

If your tent has only mesh windows/doors with no zip-up covering, start saving for a better quality tent. Meanwhile you can cover the mesh areas with sheets or batting to cut down on the dust while still allowing air to circulate. Some people use gaffers tape or duct tape for this, others go the laborious route of sewing those on.


2) Take your boots OFF before entering the tent. No exceptions.

Walking around in your tent with your boots on will track a ton of dust inside, which then works its way into everything. Flipflops are ok inside as they don't tend to have any tread for dust to get embedded into. If you need to keep your boots in the tent (such as to avoid scorpions from crawling inside) take them off first, then set them inside the tent by the door.


3) Leave your bag outside the tent (covered if you wish), or shake it off before bringing it in the tent, particularly if you've been in a dust storm.

Again, this minimizes the dust brought in, as well as minimizes the dust accumulated on your bag which can then work its way into your gear.


4) Shake out your coat our outer garments before entering the tent or before settling in for the night, particularly if you've been in a dust storm.

If it's too cold to do this take off the coat near the door and place it in a large plastic bag. That will at least keep the PigPen-like dust clouds from spreading around the tent. You can then shake it out during the day when it's warmer.


5) Store items in plastic bins or drawers instead of bags.

The plastic bins/drawers seal tighter than a bag, keeping out more dust whether the items are outside or in the tent. This is particularly helpful for cooking items, food items, general gear. Plus the bins can be stacked for more space efficiency and a smaller camp footprint. A solid frame bin/drawer also makes it easier to keep things organized and easier to find than a soft sided bag, where things get tumbled around and disheveled quickly. Less milling about in a container means less exposure to dust and less kicking up of dust.

If you aren't camping/bugging out by car then try to get gear bags that zip up fully and close well. An extra flap covering the zipper opening is helpful.


6) Compartmentalize your gear.

Keeping your gear separated into different bags or subpacks helps to keep the dust compartmentalized as well. If one bag gets dropped into the sand or especially dust beaten in a storm, the rest of your gear remains relatively dust-free. Having smaller bags within your main bag also acts as a second barrier to dust.

Many electronic items, particularly those with moving parts like a camera, need to be protected. Sports casings or waterproof casings work well. If you have neither you can use ziplock bags. Often you can operate the items through the bag.


7) Roll up or cover bedding.

When you aren't sleeping in it, tuck the pillow into the sleeping bag/sack. Then fold the foot of the bag up over head opening. This keeps the dust off your pillow and keeps the top surface of the sleeping bag protected from dust. Any dust settling into the tent will hit the underside, which will be folded back to the floor when you need to sleep. Some people like to cover their sleeping bag with a sheet instead, then fold up the sheet when it's time to sleep.


8) Use your vehicle as a wind block

If the wind is coming from a dominant direction place your vehicle to block the wind and set up your shelter on the other side. This can help cut down on the amount of dust you're subjected to during large fronts.


9) Nest your main shelter in/under shelter.

Having an extra barrier is also beneficial for sun, wind and rain protection. The common thing is to put up a tarp structure over a small tent. This allows most of the dust to collect on the outer shelter, blocking or filtering it before it blows into your main shelter. The dual barrier makes a big difference during intense desert dust storms.

_________________
status update: Y.T. has not been eaten by zombies. She's busy in the analog world.
JOIN THE ARIZONA CHAPTER!!
desert folks links/tips * ZS Wiki * beginner help & other links * women's PAW health
Anyone can use my Unofficial Welcome Wagon(TM) message, no need to give credit or thanks if you do. :)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 4:13 pm 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 11:37 pm
Posts: 1597
Location: California
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Good info Y.T. If I may, The plastic Lock and Lock containers work very well for keeping stuff out of your gear. I have quite a few I pinched from NevadaMom to put in my pack. They keep everything out of your stuff. They only weigh a little bit so for me it is worth the extra weight. Right now I keep my bags, candles and fire making stuff in one and my single dose med packets in another. most everything else is already water tight. They also make staking and organizing a bit easier. Anyway these work for me YMMV. Thanks.

_________________
Evil unchecked grows, evil tolerated poisons the entire system.- Jawaharlal Nehru


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:40 pm 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 3:35 pm
Posts: 6672
Location: Boulder, CO/Trinidad, CO
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 1 time
Great post YT. Having your gear compartmentalized is a great idea that I hadn't thought of before, yet it makes tons of sense. Same reason why you carry your water in multiple containers, if one gets contaminated or spilled you don't loose ALL your water, which can be an official 'bad thing' to have happen.

The plastic bin/tupperware idea is also pure genius, especially for something like Burning Man where you're gonna have a vehicle and don't have huge restrictions on weight/size of your gear.

_________________
Gundown wrote:
Then I saw the bear and thought... holy shit this rum is fucking awesome!

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2008 9:56 pm 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:27 pm
Posts: 4096
Location: Arizona, where the plants try to kill you and the sun tries to boil you alive
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 3 times
Squirrley wrote:
Great post YT. Having your gear compartmentalized is a great idea that I hadn't thought of before, yet it makes tons of sense. Same reason why you carry your water in multiple containers, if one gets contaminated or spilled you don't loose ALL your water, which can be an official 'bad thing' to have happen.

The plastic bin/tupperware idea is also pure genius, especially for something like Burning Man where you're gonna have a vehicle and don't have huge restrictions on weight/size of your gear.

So glad that helped. :) Yeah car camping is a ton easier since we started using small bins. They don't add much more weight and end up being more space efficient in some cases. Plus, it means the gear stays clean between uses so I don't have to rewash everything when I need it.

Since our primary bugout plan is by car I'm looking into making a box/bag combo for some of the gear (lights, batteries, fuel, stove, cooking/kitchen stuff). Like small- to mid-size containers that slip into a large tote or shoulder bag. That way I can quickly grab and carry several items at once, but don't have to keep reshuffling things when I need something. It should also make park-and-carry camping more manageable. Packing is easier too since things are more stackable. Several small and mid size containers seem to work better than one or two huge ones because you can arrange the individual ones to make the most of the space.

MJS8725 wrote:
The plastic Lock and Lock containers work very well for keeping stuff out of your gear. I have quite a few I pinched from NevadaMom to put in my pack. They keep everything out of your stuff. They only weigh a little bit so for me it is worth the extra weight. Right now I keep my bags, candles and fire making stuff in one and my single dose med packets in another. most everything else is already water tight. They also make staking and organizing a bit easier.

I checked out the site, they look very cool. bookmarked.

_________________
status update: Y.T. has not been eaten by zombies. She's busy in the analog world.
JOIN THE ARIZONA CHAPTER!!
desert folks links/tips * ZS Wiki * beginner help & other links * women's PAW health
Anyone can use my Unofficial Welcome Wagon(TM) message, no need to give credit or thanks if you do. :)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:33 pm 
Offline
*
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 5:52 pm
Posts: 36
Location: Ca.
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Good job Y.T. I've lived in the desert my whole life (34) and try to teach my kids how to survive in the most hostile place (mojave desert)
and this is probably one of the most detailed articles on desert survivle i've read in a long time!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:50 pm 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:27 pm
Posts: 4096
Location: Arizona, where the plants try to kill you and the sun tries to boil you alive
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 3 times
Soopkan wrote:
Good job Y.T. I've lived in the desert my whole life (34) and try to teach my kids how to survive in the most hostile place (mojave desert)
and this is probably one of the most detailed articles on desert survivle i've read in a long time!

Soopkan, that's great to hear. thanks. :) Most of what I've noted is just my limited experience. It sounds like you're much more knowledgeable on desert survival. Please feel free to share your own tips here, or link to any separate threads if it would be better to create a new topic. :)

_________________
status update: Y.T. has not been eaten by zombies. She's busy in the analog world.
JOIN THE ARIZONA CHAPTER!!
desert folks links/tips * ZS Wiki * beginner help & other links * women's PAW health
Anyone can use my Unofficial Welcome Wagon(TM) message, no need to give credit or thanks if you do. :)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2008 8:28 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 2:46 pm
Posts: 1964
Location: West By God Virginia
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 28 times
I enjoy four wheeling in the deserts of New Mexico and Utah, as well as the high desert and mountains of Colorado, so thought I would add my two bits on vehicle requirements for remote desert driving.

Image
The wifey and our old BOV.. great old desert rig. Pic taken just across the Colorado border in Utah.

Driving in the desert (vs hiking), to me, is much more fun as you can carry significantly more water and supplies and reach beautiful remote locations that you would never see on foot. All the while without seeing another soul... the way I like it.

So here are some vehicle tips:

Vehicle type

-4X4's are best for this type of activity, but plenty of folks traveling in two wheel drive trucks, pre-runners, sand rails, awd subarus, and VW bajas enjoy offroad desert travel as well. Deep sand and rocky travel are best left for 4X4's with low range, sandrails, and bajas.

Vehicle maintenance

-Make sure you are on top of your vehicle maintenance. Check fluids, chassis lube, bearings, coolant, battery, tires etc. before departing. If you are having cooling problems, get them fixed, they will only get worse/overheat at the low speed driving in the heat of the desert. If you have a lot of mechanical breakdowns from day-to-day use, I wouldn't suggest solo remote desert travel.

-Be familiar with your rig, it will normally let you know it's having troubles long before a failure.

Equipment/vehicle stuff to bring

**Important** Make sure your load is secured in the vehicle. There is nothing worse than stuff flying around the cabin in the bumpy stuff.

-Extra fluids- brake, gearbox, differential, engine and coolant

-A usable toolkit specific for your vehicle, not just what comes with the factory jack, but real sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers etc..

-A BMF hammer, very useful in various situations

-A hand axe and shovel

-a Hi-Lift jack of some kind, and a wide sturdy board to put under it so it doesn't sink into soft sand at the base. Factory scissor and bottle jacks just don't cut it in sandy/desert areas.

-A full size spare tire in good shape with decent tread. Dryrotted sidewalls/spares are useless at low tire pressures and can often lead to secondary failures.

-A sand anchor recovery system of some kind. I prefer the Pull Pal. http://www.pullpal.com A large pipe or even your spare tire will work in an emergeny, though.

-Come-alongs, tow straps/chain, Clevis hooks, etc.. and know how to use them. If you have a winch, that's fine as well, but most folks don't have 'em.

-Extra Water and Gas cans for the vehicle. If you plan on being out there for a couple days I recommend these. Most of the time they aren't need but they are good to have.

-A portable air compressor for re-inflating the tires when you get back to hard surfaces.

Planning your route

-Make sure you have detailed maps of the area you will be traveling in. I recommend Quads as they are the most detailed, but larger topo maps are fine as well.

-Carry a compass or GPS. Know how to use them with your map. Many roads/trails won't be on the maps and it is fairly easy to get yourself turned around.

-If Zombies aren't attacking, let your friends/family know where you are heading and when you expect to be back.

-Try to stay on the trail. Its bad for the environment to go off the designated trail/road and it is often a whole lot easier to get stuck

Desert Driving Tips

-Wear your seatbelt!

-Lower your tire pressure! The bigger the footprint the better the traction! I usually run between 6-8 psi, but this will vary depending on your vehicle weight and tire set-up.

-Keep your speed down. Even in flat areas where you feel like you might want to put your foot in it, don't. Arroyos, washes, sinkholes, and even rocks can come on faster than you think, reeking havok on you wheels and drivetrain, potentially disabling your vehicle.

-Try to maintain speed in deep sand. Beginers often want to muscles through the deep stuff, spinning tires and eventually digging themselves in until they are completely stuck.

-Keep it in 4 wheel drive. Even if you are just cruising around in four high. Usually in sand, by the time you figure out you need it, its too late and you are stuck.

-Drive carefully on craggy, rocky ground with low tire pressures. Its easy to tear a sidewall in these situations.

-Cross deep ruts etc.. on an angle, one tire at a time. Be careful ascending and descending on loose slopes. Be very careful backing down hazards, as this is where many rollovers occur.

-Scout difficult terrain, and use your passenger as a spotter for you when needed.

-Use sunsceen! Especially your arms.. the worst sunburn I ever received was on my left arm from being propped on the window frame with the window down for hours and hours. Live and learn eh?

Getting Stuck

-Don't panic, it happens to everyone.

-Its usually easier to be pulled out from the rear to stable ground you were just on than through a hazard. Once pulled free, you can continue on, driving around the hazard.

-If you have a follow vehicle, hook up the straps and ask for a tow. If not, dig a hole for your sand anchor. If you don't have one, dig a hole anyway and throw your spare tire with a tow strap attached into it. Note: anchoring off your spare can often destroy the tire or bend the wheel. It works in a bad spot with no other way out, but its best to have other equipment handy.

-Winch away! No Winch? Time for some exercise - Come-a-long FTW!

Other Stuff to bring

-I always bring my BOB and my sidearm. I have never needed either of them, but again, its better to have 'em than not if you end up for an unexpected, extended stay in the bush.

-Standard FAK with Snake and Insect bite preparations. It's the desert and there are amazingly nasty little buggers everywhere!

-A full brimmed hat or boonie

-Sunglasses

-Cell or SAT phone. Cell phones work in some desert areas in Utah and New Mexico, but for the most part there is nothing. SAT phones are great for this type of thing.

-Water, Water, and more Water. I usually carry 2-3 Five gallon Military plastic water jugs, depending on the length of the outing. Make sure the potable water is visibly marked to separate it from the engine coolant containers etc..

-Bandana for serious dust

-Visene/Murine eye drops

-Boots with high uppers. Everything in the desert is pointy and out to get you.

-Leather work gloves

-Food, drinks, etc..

Hopes this helps! The desert can be a beautiful thing.

Please feel free to add stuff as well, I tried to include everything I could think of, but there is a ton more info out there on desert driving as well.

_________________
Image

Hectic Hardwear - Morale Patches
moralepatches.com
Follow on facebook

offcamber's INCH Bag thread


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:29 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 5:02 pm
Posts: 1075
Location: Las Vegas
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Spent last weekend doing the recreational hiking and swimming thing down in Lake Havasu City; was a nice change from my usual Vegas-area trips. But the 110-degree heat really hammered home just how screwed we'd be if things get so desparate that we'd need to bug out of the American southwest on foot.

Gonna make some minor changes to my gear organization, and some major upgrades on my BOV preps and alternate plans.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:32 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 8:17 pm
Posts: 6915
Location: Bensalem, PA
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 18 times
FelixArchon wrote:
But the 110-degree heat really hammered home just how screwed we'd be if things get so desparate that we'd need to bug out of the American southwest on foot.


110? Sounds like a nice brisk cool day to me. :lol:

_________________
-NREMT - EMT
-NFPA 1006 Rescue Technician
-Instructor AHA BLS for HCP CPR & AED

My Aid Bag
*Standard medical disclaimer applies to all of my posts, YMMV, Always check CNS before and after, never let the new guy drive, don't attempt anything you read here without proper supervision..... Blah Blah Blah*


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 1:06 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member

Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:33 am
Posts: 1379
Location: Florence, AZ
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
I've been doing some major upgrades and restocking to my BOB / INCH Bag which I'll probably post up here later tonight. I still have about 5 more pounds of gear to add, but my pack is coming up on 55lbs already, and I have a few questions for you fellow desert folks:

Would you ditch an appx. 12' x 10' tarp so save on weight? I was considering replacing it with heavy-duty-ish bed sheet, but I know that it really wouldn't have the same shade and water proofing abilities.

Would you ditch an e-tool / camp shovel to save on weight? After thinking it over, I really can't justify having something that heavy that won't be able to penetrate the hard-as-hell desert dirt. Anyone able to back me up or prove me wrong on this? (It may come into good use once I make to my ultimate destination up north.)

In a larger / extended stay bag, would you replace a relatively heavy, smaller BOB that is located inside the larger one with compression bags to save on weight?

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 1:52 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 5:02 pm
Posts: 1075
Location: Las Vegas
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Duffman wrote:
Would you ditch an appx. 12' x 10' tarp so save on weight? I was considering replacing it with heavy-duty-ish bed sheet, but I know that it really wouldn't have the same shade and water proofing abilities.

Would you ditch an e-tool / camp shovel to save on weight? After thinking it over, I really can't justify having something that heavy that won't be able to penetrate the hard-as-hell desert dirt. Anyone able to back me up or prove me wrong on this? (It may come into good use once I make to my ultimate destination up north.)

In a larger / extended stay bag, would you replace a relatively heavy, smaller BOB that is located inside the larger one with compression bags to save on weight?


#1: A tarp is important, and it needs to be waterproof to be useful as a shelter and as a water-gathering tool, if necessary. You might switch to a smaller or lighter-weight tarp, or to a good utility-type poncho, but a bed sheet will not work well for anything except a sun shade.

#2: No. A good e-tool is the do-it-all must-have desert tool, the same way a machete is the do-it-all must-have jungle tool. Lots of desert survival and water-gathering techniques require you to move ground, and you don't want to do that with your hands. Make sure you have a good one, by which I mean one that WILL NOT break. The weight sucks, but that's life.

#3: Not sure what you're asking on this one. You've got a smaller bag with essentials inside a larger bag with not-quite-so-important stuff?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 1:55 pm 
Offline
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2008 8:00 pm
Posts: 2247
Has thanked: 8 times
Been thanked: 51 times
FelixArchon wrote:
#2: No. A good e-tool is the do-it-all must-have desert tool, the same way a machete is the do-it-all must-have jungle tool. Lots of desert survival and water-gathering techniques require you to move ground, and you don't want to do that with your hands. Make sure you have a good one, by which I mean one that WILL NOT break. The weight sucks, but that's life.


As an addendum to that, make sure your e-tool is one of the ones that has a spike on the back so you can lock the head at a 90-degree angle and use it as a pick to break up the ground, then use the spade part to move it.

_________________
Politics is like having two handfuls of shit - one that smells bad and one that looks bad - and having to decide which one to put in your mouth.

"If the Russian flag were accurate, it would depict half a cabbage, a bottle of vodka, and a cold man dying for the Motherland."


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:58 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member

Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:33 am
Posts: 1379
Location: Florence, AZ
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Man... I guess I'll keep the e-tool. Perhaps I haven't looked into it's usefulness enough. :oops: I've decided to go ahead and keep a tarp in the bag, but switch it to a lightweight one as soon as I can afford it. I really don't get out enough to learn and put these skills to work. :(

FelixArchon: As for the #3 item, I have a 3-day BOB (with no more than what is needed for 3 days) inside my larger bag (which has the e-tool, tarp, tent, etc...) I just wanted to see if anyone would agree that maybe I can swap out that heavy duty bag with a lighter compression bag. (Or do a good job of convincing me to keep it.)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 2:15 pm 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member

Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:33 am
Posts: 1379
Location: Florence, AZ
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Well, a day late and a dollar short, here's my bag. :P

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=34005

Suggestions for better desert living are appreciated.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 3:16 pm 
Offline
* *

Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 12:48 am
Posts: 136
Location: The Great Mojave Desert
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Hello everybody. My name is Cannon and I'm a desert rat. *chorus* Hi Cannon.

Here are some odds and ends tips.

Clothing.

bedoins ALA Lawrence of Arabia have the best desertwear there is. Mimick it. No tight clothes. Wear long sleeves and pants. Bright colors attract attention and bees. Go with light browns. You'll blend in better and stay cooler. You really want a broadbrimmed hat preferably one that lets the breeze through so the crown does not become a heat sink. Sunglasses are required. The tighter fitting wrapearound helps keep the sunlight out around the edges and helps with dust. A Bandana is the swiss army knife of desert wear. It provides shade and sand protection. It can be a wash cloth, towel and a thousand other uses.

Always shake out your clothes before putting them on!

Boots and Gators.

You have to have footwear that wears well and protects you from biting things and plants that skewer. High top snakeproof boots work great but are warm on the feet and most boots are 8 in high. You can go with a lighter weight uppers and Gators over that. Gators cover from knee to ankle the strap on over your pants and boots. Their purpose is to be snake and cactus proof.

Always shake out your boots before putting them on!

Water.

Here's some hints to find water.

I've found more springs and Tejana's in the foothills and mountains than in the flats.

Look for Bee's. Bee's usually hive within a mile or so of consistant water. Bee's also fly deadline straight to and from the water. If you spot a Bee note it's direction whip out your compass with the sights and note the direction and follow. Keep an eye out for other bees to keep you on track. If the bee is just buzzing around follow him back to the hive and look for Bees going directly from the hive on the same flightpath as those returning from the same direction.

There is an ocean of water under the desert but it's usually beyond how far you can dig with your shovel. Water does come to or near the surface though.

Look around. Do you see anything really green or trees? You'll want to pay special attention to arroyos and washes. If you see a brighter green than the rest of the desert you are in. Grab your shovel and go. Dig near the green plants. If you hit moist sand or dirt you're doing good. Dig a feet further and don't forget you may have to wait for water to seep into your hole.

Don't forget birds and coyotes need water and you can observe birds and try to follow them. They know where all the springs and Tejanas are. A Tejana is where rain water has collected in rock basins. Some last all summer and some don't but if you find one make sure you purify the water.

Tracking a Coyote is not as hard as you may think expecially on dirt or sand. The paw points the direction of travel. Just follow the pawprints. If you lose the track you can backtrack and try to pick up the tracks again or start making circles until you pick them up again. You will notice though that they usually follow a trail. Those trails can also be discerned over rock. Next time you go camping start teaching yourself how to track. It's actually fun and once you get the hang of it it's a pretty cool skill to have.

Travel.

Assuming you have not found a water supply yet. You're afoot in the desert. Travel by night. Walking across the desert by day is crazy. You'll use up all your water and energy fast.

Before sunrise dig into a hill or into the ground and put your tarp over you with space for the breeze to blow through. The deeper into the ground you dig the cooler you will be. So it's a compromise between the energy you'll use and the coolness you'll gain.

Morning and evening are when most critters are out feeding. So stay awake during those times so you can snag some game. Who doesn't love BBQ? Also watch for bees. Sleep through the hot part of the day in your shade and be up and alert about three hours before sunset.

Don't hurry when hiking. Pick a slow easy pace that you can easily maintain to conserve energy and keep your body heat as low as possible.

More on food, Vehicles and more later.

_________________
The Earth will survive
Save yourself


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 7:10 pm 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 3:35 pm
Posts: 6672
Location: Boulder, CO/Trinidad, CO
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 1 time
Very nice Cannon. I can't wait for part two :P

_________________
Gundown wrote:
Then I saw the bear and thought... holy shit this rum is fucking awesome!

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 1:58 am 
Offline
* * * * *

Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 1:25 am
Posts: 1681
Location: NV
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 13 times
I have been a desert backpacker for a few decades and I have never needed an e-tool. I carry a lightweight plastic trowel for digging a toilet, but etools are heavy. What are we digging that requires a pick? In my truck I have digging implements, but on foot? Am I making a defensive trench? Thanks, but I will carry more water instead.

The tarp, however, is essential. There are lightweight waterproof tarps at camping stores.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 1:09 am 
Offline
* *

Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 12:48 am
Posts: 136
Location: The Great Mojave Desert
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Desert Dining.

Pt1. Who does not like BBQ? Fowl, Reptile and mammal.

My experiences are in the Mojave desert. You're desert may vary.

The desert offers many opportunities for meat. Working the food chain from the bottom up.

Snakes and lizards are fairly easy to catch and cook. Lizard/snake on a stick. Simply catch, peel and BBQ.

The Mojave has a large quail population. A well thrown rock, stick, or a .22 will garner you dinner. With those same tools you can also get Jack and Cottontail rabbits. Cotton tails taste much better.

Coyote anyone? Great pelts for Winter warmth.

Going up in size and caliber.

The Mojave also has population of Deer and California Big Horn Sheep. Deer are easier to find but both taste great and provide many pounds of meat and large skins. You will need to preserve the meat by jerking.

Lastly is Mule. Mules are found in Eastern CA and into AZ. Historical accounts from the 1800's state that Native Americans would rather have Mule than Beef.

Tip. Where you find Mules there is good water close by and probably Deer and possibly Big Horn Sheep.

Desert bug out tip. AAA maps from the '50s show springs and Oasis's as does the Delorme. Go out in advance and confirm the water and start planning now. If you are near water dinner comes to you.

Do not set up your camp at the water as the animals will shy away. They'll go thirsty and you'll go hungry.

_________________
The Earth will survive
Save yourself


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Bedoiuns
PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:39 am 
Offline
*
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 9:03 pm
Posts: 75
Location: Tucson, AZ
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time
Yep, the bedoiuns have it hands down for desert survival, not just layers clothing but layered tents. The layers help by doing more than just insulating but but providing a personal microclimate that can use that rare and essential moisture that is given off as perspiration. The layers also help insulate from the massive solar flux that our beloved/cruel desert region is known for. A side note on desert food.... I will have to find a good link to it but i do recall that the yucca root can be made into a form of bread for those too sqweemish to eat roasted scorpions and BBQ bat.

_________________
"An uair a théid an gobhainn air bhathal 'se is feàrr a bhi réidh ris."

My EDC-BOB/FAK
My Wiki Contributions

CERT member


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 64 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group