Bug Out Bag for Dog

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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BullOnParade
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Bug Out Bag for Dog

Post by BullOnParade » Thu Mar 04, 2021 10:31 pm

Taking a few minutes to share the bag I've put together for the family dog.
Much like my last thread - Bug Out Bag for Baby - the objective of this bag is a 72 hour bag of essentials for an incident which has forced us from our home, but society and the world around us is still functioning in a normal capacity. The bag is not designed to keep the dog alive through long periods of exposure, but make him comfortable through an extended hotel stay or crashing at a friend's home. This bag also serves as our travel bag when the dog comes with us, whether it be camping or visiting family/friends.

Much like my daughter's bag, I switched to a duffle bag, because my wife and I carry backpacks for our own bags, and carrying multiple backpacks are not a practical option. This particular bag was given to my wife when she joined a gym. Don't know any stats on it, but it's a basic duffle, probably under 20L in volume, with one pocket on the end, and a side flap pocket, plus a mesh water bottle pocket.

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I added the paracord pulls to each zipper, making the zippers more functional with gloves, easier to find in the dark, and easier to direct someone else to the correct pocket who doesn't know the bag.

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While I'd love to picture myself and my dog in a post apocalyptic wasteland, taking on zeds, my companion off leash and walking nicely a half pace behind me ... Neither I nor my dog are disciplined enough to achieve that, especially in a high stress environment when "exciting" things are happening around us. And again, this isn't an apocalypse kit, society expects dogs to be on leash, so in the end pocket, we keep an extra collar and leash, with waste pickup bags in a (white) carrier on the leash (hard to distinguish against the white freezer I took pictures on). There's also our high viz collar with Nite-ize light. When we have taken the dog to places where he can be off leash safely, the light is great for keeping track of him.

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In the other outside pocket is a few things focussed on paw protection, and a few recall items. The left edge of the photo got cut off, but the grey socks are latex dipped socks for dogs. The "Pawz" are my favourite boot, though they require the beige pliers to put on easily - at least with a dog who's not crazy about putting on boots. We have other, stronger neoprene boots for day to day use, but these are are about as thick as a balloon or thick latex glove. Down side to these, is that the dog's nails will puncture them if not maintained, though the socks work as a buffer when used together. If they don't get punctured, the boots are reusable. Boots are a requirement here, especially in the winter when salted roads torture paw pads. They come in other colours, purple was just the first package I bought. Waiting for a sale to restock, hopefully another colour is available then.

I also have a cheap pair of gloves for general tasks with the dog. These were a free set from somewhere, I'd like to upgrade to a pair of light duty work gloves like mechanix or similar. An old facecloth for wiping down the dogs paws, hand sanitizer because, and a keychain carabiner with training clicker and dog whistle. The dog is familiar with clicker training, and we have successfully taught him new tasks for as long as we've had him. He's a smart dog and has potential to learn new things in a different environment. The dog whistle is a tool we never used with him, but I have it, so it may as well be here. The small plastic box has a tiny toy squeaker. My wife bought a bag of toy squeakers to repair some of the dogs favourite toys. The squeaker on it's own is a reliable way to get his attention in distracting environments.

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The main compartment of the bag is a dog's breakfast, literally and figuratively.

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On the top left is the same bed we use at home, it's like a large pillow case, which can be stuffed with anything for padding, it will hold three standard pillows. In the event of a BO, the dog would be happy just to have it as his own, familiar space, even flat on the floor.

Under that is a black pouch I'll dive into in a minute.

A couple bandanas and a folded up rain coat. I'm not crazy about the coat. I'm not crazy about rain coats in general on dogs, any rain that accumulates is going to get kicked up the legs and stomach anyways. Missing from this photo is a winter jacket we have which is modelled after a horse blanket. Locally made, simple design, blocks the wind with a simple velcro strap across the breast plate and under the stomach. The velcro needs to be improved upon, but it's been the only jacket I've liked which isn't made by Hurtta (look them up if youre curious), which is out of my budget.

You'll also see a retractable leash (with another dispenser of cleanup bags), this leash is essential when hiking. Next to that is a car crash rated harness (the seat belt strap didn't make it into the photo somehow, but its in the bag). Though this harness hasn't been used since our daughter was born and the dog was moved into the cargo area of the car.

The stack of plastic containers, each holding 4 cups of food, our dog typically eats 3 cups per day, so an extra cup is for days when he's heavily active. Also carry 1KG of reduced sugar peanut butter (sealed) and spatula. High calorie treat/diet booster, keeps him distracted when you need to do something involving his ears or nails, which he is not crazy about. Four rolls of poop bags in a zip lock bag, These things can always serve other uses, but it doesn't hurt to have spares. Blue bowl in the bottom right is a miniature version of the "slow feeder" bowl we use at home. I don't pack a measuring cup for food because the bowl is limited to two cups and the containers are pre measured into four cup daily intakes, so it's not a big deal if we're a little over/under per meal. Above the blue bowl is the bottom of a takeout food container, lightweight water bowl. And top right is a Canadian invented dog water bottle known as Lap-It-Up with a bowl on top and a straw into the bottle, squeeze the bottle, water is in the bowl, release the bottle and the water returns to the bottle. Great for hydrating a dog on the move without wasting water.

Lastly is the black pouch, which was a toiletry bag from a christmas gift set years ago, now it's k9 first aid.

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The pill bottles are two different pain killers/sedatives. The sedative is from a "fear free" vet we used to use, it makes him a little dopy, but allows him to walk on his own control, essential in the event of him being injured far from the car. The two drugs can be used together, but he would probably need to be carried. Blister pack is monthly dose of flea/tick/worm preventative medicine, typically buy every 6 months with a minimum of two months in storage (yes, we'll be ordering soon). I keep the box from that medication folded up, in case it needs to be referenced. Single serve peanut butter for giving pills, redundant to the kg pictured above.

Various bottles of ointments - This is our only dog first aid kit in the house.
Dry shampoo
Anti itch spray
Anti hot spot spray
Pain relief spray
Ear cleaners
Paw Balm (like a chap stick)

Hydrogen Peroxide (3%) this one should be in every dog first aid kit. A small amount of hydrogen peroxide will induce vomiting in dogs. Consult with your vet before attempting, if your dog eats something dangerous, inducing vomiting may not be the best course of action. This bottle is actually too big for the purposes of this kit, but I haven't been able to find something with a simple screw on lid in a smaller bottle. My dog is about 66 pounds and we have induced vomiting with 1 teaspoon of hydrogen peroxide after he ate something that was potentially poisonous. Vomit will be foamy, and start within minutes of administering peroxide.

The little blue container is a small 1oz container of petroleum jelly, a coarse/soft brush, two sizes of elasti-wrap bandage and the dropper.

Not pictured
10ml syringe (no needle) as an alternative method for administering drugs.
Muzzle was in the wash after practicing putting it on and giving treats.
I've got to dig out some sort of tick tool to leave in this bag. I have several with camping stuff.

In the first picture you can see the mesh water bottle pouch has a small spray bottle in it, I don't know if I trust this bottle to be leak free yet, but it's a decanted bottle of "bronco" equestrian bug spray. Our dog is terrified of bugs. This is the best stuff we've found, though it's citronella based and some vets recommend not using citronella on dogs. A friend of mine moved close to the arctic and uses this on her dogs, she recommended it to me last summer and we loved the results.

My dog isn't a highly trained guard dog, or military grade companion. He's an adopted, skittish, sensitive suck. He has dietary restrictions that would incapacitate him in a true apocalypse, and he doesn't listen well enough when scenarios get too exciting for him. But this bag isn't about bringing him into an apocalypse, it's about making a member of the family comfortable when we're all otherwise pushed beyond our comfort zones.

As always, welcome to comments, questions or criticisms. If you see a gaping hole, point it out. If you want to know why I did a particular thing, ask.
BullOnParade
It has to start somewhere. It has to start sometime. What better place than here? What better time than now?

Bug Out Bag for:
Baby
Dog

CrossCut
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Re: Bug Out Bag for Dog

Post by CrossCut » Fri Mar 05, 2021 5:51 am

Outstanding! I. Must. Do. This. Too.

License and vaccination records, maybe a photocopy of the dog tags in case the collar is lost? Canned dog food, longer shelf life, less rotating?

I've used hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting on one of my mutts, ate a mushroom in the woods as a puppy. Used a syringe to administer it too. It works quickly, and didn't upset the dog much or have any lasting effects after vomiting. 60 mL of H2O2 and a syringe is in each of our FAKs now. Benedryl liquid or liqui-caps? Family member's dog got into a nest of ground bees once while visiting us, over 50 stings. Cheat sheet for pet dosages of meds (like antibiotics) that you have in your BOB, in fact maybe some extra Keflex just for them? Good ABX for soft tissue injuries.

Needle nose pliers and curved hemostats for porcupine quill extraction, and a bottle of Skunk-Off.

Great kit, great thread!

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BullOnParade
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Re: Bug Out Bag for Dog

Post by BullOnParade » Fri Mar 05, 2021 10:18 am

CrossCut wrote:
Fri Mar 05, 2021 5:51 am
Outstanding! I. Must. Do. This. Too.

License and vaccination records, maybe a photocopy of the dog tags in case the collar is lost? Canned dog food, longer shelf life, less rotating?

I've used hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting on one of my mutts, ate a mushroom in the woods as a puppy. Used a syringe to administer it too. It works quickly, and didn't upset the dog much or have any lasting effects after vomiting. 60 mL of H2O2 and a syringe is in each of our FAKs now. Benedryl liquid or liqui-caps? Family member's dog got into a nest of ground bees once while visiting us, over 50 stings. Cheat sheet for pet dosages of meds (like antibiotics) that you have in your BOB, in fact maybe some extra Keflex just for them? Good ABX for soft tissue injuries.

Needle nose pliers and curved hemostats for porcupine quill extraction, and a bottle of Skunk-Off.

Great kit, great thread!
Great suggestions.

I'm past due to update all my digital records and photocopies. A lot to update since moving recently, waiting for an online ink order to get the printer running again.

Our dog has some sort of protein allergy. It leads to a lot of ear infections and skin irritation which makes him miserable and difficult. We spent a lot of time experimenting with different commercial food options because, frankly, hypoallergenic and medicated options were beyond our budget. At this time, it's just easier to keep him on his normal food than find something else we can use in an emergency. I buy a bag every 6 weeks and rotate out stock at the start of each bag. I try to pick up the bag two weeks before we need it, which keeps us between 3-8 weeks of stock in case of distribution disruptions.

Familiarizing yourself with dosing otc drugs on dogs is important and something I should review, make notes of, and keep in this bag. We keep a good stock of otc drugs in our bug out bags. One item I saw at a local dollar store last week was a tool to store, crush and split pills, might find room for that in here for that purpose.

A couple more first aid tools will probably find their way in here, thanks for the suggestion. Between all the family's bug out bags, first aid has been my most neglected category, especially as my family has grown. I've just recently restocked our boo-boo kits with bandages, cleaning supplies and otc drugs. A more advanced trauma kit for my wife's bag (and dog too, now) will be next.
BullOnParade
It has to start somewhere. It has to start sometime. What better place than here? What better time than now?

Bug Out Bag for:
Baby
Dog

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