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 Post subject: The Campfire Dragon.
PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 12:31 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2006 5:15 pm
Posts: 9423
Location: CT
I really like small twig/wood burning stoves for the my hiking pack and BOB. They never run out of fuel and very often there is little to go wrong. Actually I shouldn't say that. A small firebox is harder to sustain flames than a large tent stove or fire ring. Wet wood makes it even more problematic. That's why I like bellows to help stoke the flames. There is a bit of history here.

Over a decade ago I purchased a twig burning stove known as a Stratus Trail stove. It appears to be still for sale. Made in the USA which whenever possible I like.

For 20 bucks it's still a great deal.

http://www.trailstove.com/details.html

The stove comes with an addition to blow air directly into the firebox without getting a face full of smoke. The coals would glow more intensely allowing the stove to flash over easily when smoldering.

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Even has a little port for the pipe. Just blow on the other end and the fire triangle (heat---fuel---oxygen) takes care of the rest.

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I always wanted to DIY something even smaller for my kit but never gotten around to it. Then one day I stumbled onto the Campfire Dragon. 9-14 dollars online so figured that would be a good solution. A small USA made cottage industry type thing. I am really drawn to stuff like this. Just look at that green dragon blowing flames on the campfire in their website. I can't get enough of stuff like that. The trail stove is a similar gear item as is made in the USA, not that expensive and fun. :D

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http://www.campfiredragon.com/

Fits right in my backpacking fire kit.

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The Dragon. Beyond being bellows a tube is actually useful survival kit in it's own right. Length is 2.5 feet.

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Wooden mouth piece to help blow.

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A metal end so it will not melt and little wooden sliders so yea don't crush the tubing when holding to maximize air flow.

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The general idea..... Wet wood and ground.

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Blow on the coals.

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And the fire really flares up.

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If everything is very dry I don't need it. In fact can get along just fine without a bellow tube but IMHO makes the job easier in the wet conditions. For example.

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Using my neck knife to remove some of the wet bark and fine splitting.

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In the video you can see the entire process of igniting the stove and using the bellows in very wet condtions.

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Bacon is done!!!

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For those who are pyros check out the video.


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"There's no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"
"Do not mess with the forces of Nature, for thou art small and biodegradable!"

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