Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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moab
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Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by moab » Sat Nov 12, 2016 2:09 pm

https://kelty.com/bestie-blanket/

Looks smaller. Any thoughts? Still checking it out. I don't think I'd ever buy one considering I'm 6'3" and the USGI fits me well. But a pretty genius idea IMHO.

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Re: Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by boskone » Sun Nov 13, 2016 1:30 pm

It is smaller, by nearly 2 feet lengthwise. I think the naming is spot-on: it's a blanket, not a poncho liner.

I think it'd be nice for comfort camping, or taking to sports games and the like.

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Re: Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by Woods Walker » Wed Nov 16, 2016 12:40 am

Too short for me but guessing it would be better than nothing.
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Re: Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by zero11010 » Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:00 am

It looks like the MSRP is less than $25. I wouldn't expect too much from it, and I wouldn't expect it to really compete with a $150+ Kifaru Woobie.

I kinda liked this which is similar to the Kelty:
http://www.costco.com/Double-Black-Diam ... 14979.html
That's a pair of down throws for $40 with 700 fill. 60" by 70" (kelty is 75.5" by 42.25")

You wouldn't want to pack it and leave it packed long term.
You wouldn't want to use it if you were expecting rain.

Last time I was at the local costco they sold them individually for $20. I imagine the down throws are warmer, lighter, and pack smaller than the Kelty option. The trade offs are as mentioned above.

A LOT of backpackers have been switching away from sleeping bags and moving to down blankets so it makes me pretty curious. Especially because 5-10 of these individual throws are still cheaper than one of most reasonable sleeping bags so the longevity may not be a real factor.

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moab
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Re: Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by moab » Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:42 am

zero11010 wrote:It looks like the MSRP is less than $25. I wouldn't expect too much from it, and I wouldn't expect it to really compete with a $150+ Kifaru Woobie.

I kinda liked this which is similar to the Kelty:
http://www.costco.com/Double-Black-Diam ... 14979.html
That's a pair of down throws for $40 with 700 fill. 60" by 70" (kelty is 75.5" by 42.25")

You wouldn't want to pack it and leave it packed long term.
You wouldn't want to use it if you were expecting rain.

Last time I was at the local costco they sold them individually for $20. I imagine the down throws are warmer, lighter, and pack smaller than the Kelty option. The trade offs are as mentioned above.

A LOT of backpackers have been switching away from sleeping bags and moving to down blankets so it makes me pretty curious. Especially because 5-10 of these individual throws are still cheaper than one of most reasonable sleeping bags so the longevity may not be a real factor.
Apologies in advance. But who the hell buys a $150 woobie? For christsake! I'll stick with a $30 USGI poncho liner. I mean what does it take to make a woobie? It's a rectangle. With some waves sewn into it to hold the material. Which by the way is simple polyester. But I'm sure the Kifaru one is made from the rarest of baby seal feathers. ;) So there's that.

One correction on down blankets and sleeping bags. Down can be stored stuffed. It's synthetic that can not. And most down these days is some form of "dry down". Which makes it quite water proof or at the least very resistant. Normal care will keep your bag dry and you warm.

Gotta love Costco. Only thing I hate is that their stuff is so regional. I'd love to buy a $20 down quilt. But I guarantee you they aren't available at every store. Still the best damn dog food for the price. Put tons of muscle on my dogs without breaking the bank. Unlike the Walmart Ole Roy which made them have to eat so much (just to get the nutrition they needed) that they vomited on a daily basis. And became terribly skinny. But you can't beat a Walmart tshirt either. At 5 bucks each their throw away.

"5-10 of these individual throws are still cheaper than one of most reasonable sleeping bags"

I'd still rather have a Kelty dry down bag for $200 or less. Watch their sales and free shipping. And Campmor puts their stuff on sale occasionally as well. But I don't think I want a Kelty woobie that's even smaller than the USGI version. It barely fits me as it is. I use one regularly as a blanket at home. I don't tell anybody that. Cause well...I'm not white trash. LMAO! But they so kick ass as a blanket in my climate. ;) (OK. Maybe I am a little white trash.)

I think this Kelty bestie or whatever it's called is a no win deal. Buy a tan woobie for $30 and don't tell your friends what it is. Otherwise they'll think your white trash. ;)
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Re: Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by zero11010 » Sun Nov 20, 2016 3:29 am

moab wrote:One correction on down blankets and sleeping bags. Down can be stored stuffed. It's synthetic that can not.




http://www.backpacker.com/gear/sleeping ... eping-bag/
"Never store your bag in its itty-bitty stuff sack! The longer you compress the insulation, the more loft it loses. It’s fine to use a stuff sack-even a compression stuff sack-on the trail, but the minute you get home, get your sleeper out of that confined space, give it a good shake to fluff up the fill material, then store it in a cool, dry place. Spread it out under your bed, hang it in a closet, or put it in a big, breathable storage bag (often provided by the manufacturer). If you don’t have such a sack, use a king-size pillowcase."

http://www.backcountry.com/explore/how- ... eeping-bag
"Whether you have a bag filled with down or synthetic insulation, both work on the same principle: they trap air to keep you warm. For this reason it’s important to store your bag “uncompressed” so the insulation doesn’t get crushed and lose its ability to loft back out when you want to sleep in it.

Your bag should come with two storage sacks. One will be large and made of mesh, cotton, or some other light, breathable material. This is the long-term storage sack, meaning it’s OK for your sleeping bag to be stashed in for extended periods of time. The other bag that comes with your sleeping bag is the stuff sack. This one is much smaller and made of more durable material. You can also purchase a compression sack, which has external straps that help you shrink the sleeping bag down to the smallest possible size. Doing this won’t damage the insulation as long as it’s not kept that way for an extended period of time."


https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice ... g-bag.html
"Do not store your bag compressed in its stuff sack as this will eventually damage the fill. Watertight storage bags are also a bad idea. Condensation can build up inside and result in mildew."

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moab
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Re: Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by moab » Thu Nov 24, 2016 5:20 pm

zero11010 wrote:
moab wrote:One correction on down blankets and sleeping bags. Down can be stored stuffed. It's synthetic that can not.




http://www.backpacker.com/gear/sleeping ... eping-bag/
"Never store your bag in its itty-bitty stuff sack! The longer you compress the insulation, the more loft it loses. It’s fine to use a stuff sack-even a compression stuff sack-on the trail, but the minute you get home, get your sleeper out of that confined space, give it a good shake to fluff up the fill material, then store it in a cool, dry place. Spread it out under your bed, hang it in a closet, or put it in a big, breathable storage bag (often provided by the manufacturer). If you don’t have such a sack, use a king-size pillowcase."

http://www.backcountry.com/explore/how- ... eeping-bag
"Whether you have a bag filled with down or synthetic insulation, both work on the same principle: they trap air to keep you warm. For this reason it’s important to store your bag “uncompressed” so the insulation doesn’t get crushed and lose its ability to loft back out when you want to sleep in it.

Your bag should come with two storage sacks. One will be large and made of mesh, cotton, or some other light, breathable material. This is the long-term storage sack, meaning it’s OK for your sleeping bag to be stashed in for extended periods of time. The other bag that comes with your sleeping bag is the stuff sack. This one is much smaller and made of more durable material. You can also purchase a compression sack, which has external straps that help you shrink the sleeping bag down to the smallest possible size. Doing this won’t damage the insulation as long as it’s not kept that way for an extended period of time."


https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice ... g-bag.html
"Do not store your bag compressed in its stuff sack as this will eventually damage the fill. Watertight storage bags are also a bad idea. Condensation can build up inside and result in mildew."
And there are just as many arguments online saying that compressing down is just fine. I don't have the time to link them all. But if you do a search on google you will see that there is nothing wrong with compressing a down bag. Most of the negative instances are from packing a bag in a "compression" sack for many years. Which is very different than a "stuff" sack. And can even be reversed by simply running it one cycle through the dryer. Synthetic on the other hand breaks down a lot faster in a compression sack or a stuff sack. Many companies actually advise against it. Companies like Western Mountaineering (a down bag manufacturer) regularly state that it's fine to stuff your down bag in a stuff sack for storage.

Not trying to enter into a pissing contest. And neither one of us will probably be right. Just been my experience that these issues revolve around "years" of abuse or neglect. Not by someone who puts a modicum of care into their gear.

I myself prefer down bags. About half the weight and the same performance. Given dry down and like I say - a modicum of care. YMMV.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

zero11010
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Re: Kelty makes a Woobie (Poncho liner).

Post by zero11010 » Thu Nov 24, 2016 6:03 pm

Sure, man. I've not done any of the testing myself. I don't see this as a pissing contest, I see this as a healthy conversation. :D

I'm going to follow guidelines by people like Big Agnes, REI, and Backpacker.com though.

I do know that as you mention, there are treated down products available that are less susceptible to moisture, but the bulk of products aren't this way, and I sincerely doubt if some super budget object from costco that doesn't advertise itself as using more expensive down is using that more expensive down.


I've personally not seen anyone talk about how leaving a down back compacted is fine. So, I'm going to follow the tips from people telling you to do a thing because it will make your goods last longer, even though they will literally profit from you destroying your goods early with improper care.

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