"Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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Of the three options I listed in my post, which one do you think is most likely you would encounter?

1. Animal attack
2
6%
2. Disaster or weather related hazard
9
28%
3. Human aggressor
16
50%
4. Animal attack and disaster or weather related hazard
2
6%
5. All of the above
3
9%
 
Total votes: 32

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"Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by olaf_yahoo » Tue Nov 01, 2016 3:36 am

I've been largely absent from the forum for a few years and recently came back. Since my return I've been doing a lot of reading, trying to catch up on some of what I've missed and seeing how things here have changed. In the past few weeks I've read at least a few hundred threads in their entirety and I've noticed something I can't explain.

I've seen no less than a couple dozen instances where someone mentions something to the effect of leaving a bag behind ie. "if I have to ditch such and such bag", "if I have to drop my BOB and run", "if I have to dump my main bag". I've given it a lot of consideration and I'd like to hear your thoughts on this. In all seriousness, without romanticizing the issue I can only see a handful of reasons that this would ever be necessary.

1. You are attacked/chased unexpectedly by an animal such as a bear, moose, wolf, large cat (mountain lion variety) or any other large and dangerous wildlife. In this instance I could understand dropping a large pack if you were going to try to climb a tree, outcrop of rock or something similar to escape immediate danger. It makes sense however that the danger will in fact pass, the animal will move on if you were successful in reaching temporary shelter and would then be able to reacquire your gear. In this case, the loss is not permanent.

2. Some sort of natural disaster or weather related occurrence like an unexpected forest fire, a flash flood if you happen to be traversing a dry riverbed or slot canyon. In a situation like this it is more than possible you will either be separated from a large bag by the rush of water or will elect to abandon a large bag for the sake of mobility and speed. These cases would most likely mean the permanent loss of the larger bag and a smaller one of any sort would be essential.

3. The only other possible reason I can think of is a human threat. You are attacked suddenly or are already being pursued by persons intent on harming you, the scenario is largely irrelevant. It doesn't matter if its a civil war, natural disaster and they are looters or you have a personal enemy. Depending on the immediate situation it could be beneficial to leave behind a large pack to make better time in escaping those pursuing you.

So I'd like you to take a minute and actually think about what situations you are preparing for, why you think they are likely (not "sounds cool like a daydream fantasy") and the reasoning behind "ditching" a large pack be it a BOB, INCH, GHB or any of the other useless acronyms used to describe supplies to keep you alive and share them here.

For myself I see little probability of facing human attackers, while possible, it seems unlikely in the large scheme of potential occurrences. As such, I would be more concerned about weather related hazards and dangerous animals. I would certainly drop what I had and try to make it up a tree if a bull moose or large brown bear was encountered. Moose can't climb and brown bears are too large. The bear might eventually try to tear apart my pack to get at any food inside or it might just wander off. I've never encountered moose but it probably wouldn't hang out forever. Weather related dangers that would warrant dropping a larger bag would probably be so severe that I wouldn't survive them such as a flash flood, avalanche or forest fire. If I did have any warning then I wouldn't hesitate to rid myself of the burden and run in whatever direction indicated safety.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by bacpacjac » Tue Nov 01, 2016 7:39 am

Another scenario to consider is losing your camp: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=118475&hilit=losing+your+pack
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by majorhavoc » Tue Nov 01, 2016 9:11 am

Subscribing to the "live to fight another day" philosophy, I'd quickly abandon my pack in almost any potentially lethal scenario, regardless of the cause. If my chances of surviving the encounter are meaningfully improved by unencumbering myself, so be it. I'll deal with the consequences once I get safely away from the immediate threat.

Having said that, I think a human encounter is the most likely scenario where I'd have to make that choice.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by flybynight » Tue Nov 01, 2016 11:28 am

Animal attack would be the only reason I would ditch my bag. Only because of being able to retrieve it after the encounter.
Weather related emergencies would be the reason you have a BOB ( GHB )
Human aggressors would probably appropriate your bag for themselves.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by PWA2600 » Tue Nov 01, 2016 2:40 pm

I have worked to hard to get what I have for myself and family to just abandon it. In all likely hood, most of the scenarios will be come upon by accident/surprise; in which case if an animal or human aggressor is what is encountered your fight or flight reflex will kick in. The adrenaline will be pumping and if you fly, then I do not think you will remember you are carrying a lumbering pack on your back.

If a total collapse happens and is what I would guess most people envision for bugging out in the first place, then everyone's senses will be on high alert. So if an encounter happens all reaction/action that happens will be determined by training. The majority of the people fleeing to their BOL or even just hunting/conducting movement will have a weapon of some sort.

Superior numbers or firepower, preferably both.

In the event of a natural disaster, from what I can conceive at this moment, the only situation would be to drop my gear to enable myself to climb to a safer location. Although it may be a good idea to simply create a workout regimen that incorporates building strength that allows the user to climb a rope, climb with a backpack.

Just my .02cents
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by Asymetryczna » Tue Nov 01, 2016 5:12 pm

It is relative. If my only concern is sudden drops in temperature when the sun goes down, I am probably going to keep it close. Otherwise, I am ditching my pack every time I am done moving from it from one point to another, and sometimes on the way... I am dropping it in the patrol base (or camp) before I begin my tasks; at the staging area prior the FCL in a planned attack; as soon as there is any contact; when the helicopter stops in the drink and before it rolls over; before I get on the plane, the tank, the car, the truck, the boat, the subway; and the list is probably endless.

All packs are not made for climbing, or swimming, for example. It’s not a purse; it does not have to stay on your shoulder and match your outfits. It's not a friend, who will combine wits and energy to conquer an obstacle. It is simply a bag that stores your stuff.

What? Your understanding of the word “ditch” means forever and I used the example of “getting rid of for a time?” In that case, if you are implying that my continued survival is based entirely on the contents of this backpack, then my answer is: Contact, in which my continued survival is not certain.

A person can always find something else to carry on their back and something else to go inside of it.
Also, my clothes have pockets.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by olaf_yahoo » Tue Nov 01, 2016 5:34 pm

Asymetryczna wrote:It is relative. If my only concern is sudden drops in temperature when the sun goes down, I am probably going to keep it close. Otherwise, I am ditching my pack every time I am done moving from it from one point to another, and sometimes on the way... I am dropping it in the patrol base (or camp) before I begin my tasks; at the staging area prior the FCL in a planned attack; as soon as there is any contact; when the helicopter stops in the drink and before it rolls over; before I get on the plane, the tank, the car, the truck, the boat, the subway; and the list is probably endless.

All packs are not made for climbing, or swimming, for example. It’s not a purse; it does not have to stay on your shoulder and match your outfits. It's not a friend, who will combine wits and energy to conquer an obstacle. It is simply a bag that stores your stuff.

What? Your understanding of the word “ditch” means forever and I used the example of “getting rid of for a time?” In that case, if you are implying that my continued survival is based entirely on the contents of this backpack, then my answer is: Contact, in which my continued survival is not certain.

A person can always find something else to carry on their back and something else to go inside of it.
Also, my clothes have pockets.

All the instances I am referring to and the reason I wrote my original post were people strongly alluding to or directly stating they would abandon the bag and just leave it behind. Not set it down or take it off their shoulders, that's just regular use.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by Close_enough » Tue Nov 01, 2016 6:44 pm

One and Three.
I've seen packs taken apart by animals looking for food. Animals too large to argue with.
And, against overwhelming odds (Can't outrun them, too many to fight), I would surrender the pack.
Weather can generally be seen coming, and abandoning the pack in favor of setting up camp and waiting it out makes little sense. There are only a few exceptions to this rule. Falling in a fast moving river (sort of weather), avalanches and flash floods. In those situations, where survival is dependent on speed and agility, ditching the pack is justifiable.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by RonnyRonin » Tue Nov 01, 2016 9:38 pm

Very good topic! I am certainly one who plans in contingencies for "ditching," but perhaps more because of the ease in which it can be planned for rather then the likelihood of needing to implement.

Typically a "ditch" kit requires more thinking and strategic placement of existing gear then actual additional gear. I'm already carrying the darn stuff, I might as well put the more important bits in a place where I can keep them in the worst case scenario.

My thought process is usually evenly split between two cases:
1) BOB/GHB/INCH, my primary concern is human aggressor. I'm not someone who expects civil war/gangs/leather clad marauders on any meaningful scale, but I admit the possibility and have seen too many movies to not at least consider the possibility.

2) Backpacking/EDC, I am more counting on natural occurrences or animals (animals being unlikely in my mind). One situation I have considered reasonably likely is driving off a road in a spot that requires immediately abandoning the vehicle in a remote location (driving into a body of water, or into a spot where the vehicle could fall a considerable distance). In this case whatever is on your person or can be grabbed RIGHT NOW is all you have until you can walk out or flag down another car.
For backpacking I imagine a botched water crossing as being the most likely, but I can think of a few unlikely scenarios where abandoning your pack could be required (mostly involving cliffs, steep grades, or poor judgement).

For car use I try to keep my EDC/GHB in the passenger seat when alone, and sometimes have my HPG kit bag close at hand. For backcountry use my kit bag covers much of this requirement (pretty much stays on me until I go to bed, in which case it becomes my pillow), and when practical I keep a SERE and an FAK ankle kit on me. If I was more inclined to wear cargo pockets I would probably leverage them more often for the "just in case" stuff.

For BOB/INCH purposes I rely on the kit bag, ankle kits and currently a pack lid/lumbar pack for "drop and run" use. There is a bit of additional weight needed for this (10oz in my case) but the lumbar pack also serves for scouting and side trip use if I want to drop the larger pack at camp and roam.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by Asymetryczna » Wed Nov 02, 2016 3:21 pm

I don’t necessarily see where people are alluding to this but I will give you an example. You and three friends are backpacking somewhere. Three of you are surprised and caught and held at gunpoint by people who then, by calling others, attract an even larger group. They tell you to strip to your skivvies and shoes and throw everything else into a pile or they will begin shooting you one at a time. Not knowing if they would really shoot you, you begin disrobing. They load all of your stuff into the back of a truck and drive off with all of your supplies. To add insult, they laugh as loud as they can as they drive away. Does one worry about how much one’s favorite sleeping bag cost or how much stuff will be ordered relatively quickly on Amazon with the newly found ID’s, or does one express gratitude at taking the next breath? (Thank the heavens for that 4th guy!)

It is an interesting topic. I would ditch a pack in all of the examples you listed, with a quick plan to relocate it once I was able to put it back on and continue to march. If recovery was not possible –heck, anyone that has ever read a novel that features survival, limited resources, and living by your wits offers dozens of examples- I would hope to have EDC resources and the E&E kit to better ensure my survival. (Woodswalker has a recent thread about this topic).

On that note, somewhere a few months ago I added a link to the script for “The Revenant.” If you read it, or any book about the men that lived off the land in that time, they often carried what they called a “Possibles” pouch or bag. Hugh Glass tied his to his less injured arm as I recall:

GLASS - at the water’s edge, drinking... touching his charred, melted throat... no leaks. He slurps back more,
then opens his Possibles bag... pulls out the GRIZZLY CLAW NECKLACE... stares at it a beat, then slips it over his head.
He drags out a WORN MAP... spreads it on the ground, then throws a glance around him... fingers the point on the blue
line... a rough guess of his location.


You can find much more online and I am providing a link to one opinion found on the Kirafu Net:
https://www.kifaru.net/possibls.htm
He is a bit excessive in my opinion. Essential means different things to people...
...and other links that will make you want to attend a Rendezvous:
http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/04/1 ... -daypacks/
https://www.trackofthewolf.com/list/Item.aspx/423/1

If you have read this far then you may see that I have worked backward to the earlier reference to the purse. Ever see a woman beating a man with her purse?

Do you see when she abandons it? There's your answer. When she has to...

And the message comin' from my eyes says, "Leave it alone."

Call it your altoids plan, E&E kit, whatever. The bigger question is what you will risk your life to keep. My life is more important to me; so, in every case where the choice was my pack or my life I am abandoning the bag. My ‘possibles’ pouch, however, will likely need to be removed from my body.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by Woods Walker » Wed Nov 02, 2016 4:40 pm

There is an interesting bush panic phenomena in which the lost person panics tossing their kit in hopes of increasing their speed to get out of the situation faster. In every case I read that did not end well. I guess a fire or immediate threat to life could be a reason aka the bag is in the other side of the house which is burning. I have an E&E plus the green bag of survival to counter this issue aka times I am separated from the primary or host pack
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by Close_enough » Wed Nov 02, 2016 4:45 pm

Asymetryczna wrote: Call it your altoids plan, E&E kit, whatever. The bigger question is what you will risk your life to keep. My life is more important to me; so, in every case where the choice was my pack or my life I am abandoning the bag. My ‘possibles’ pouch, however, will likely need to be removed from my body.
You always keep critical items on your body. Compass, flint, light, whistle, knife, water carrier/pills, and large scale map. That goes without saying. We're talking about ditching all your food, camping supplies, first aid, navigation equipment, etc. All the stuff that can't fit into a pocket organizer or neck pouch.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by RonnyRonin » Wed Nov 02, 2016 8:29 pm

Close_enough wrote: You always keep critical items on your body..... That goes without saying.
Not in many circles. I remember a discussion I had about the need or lack of need for primitive skills with someone who had recently been above the arctic circle on a kayaking trip, they cited rolling/falling out of a kayak as a need to be able to do various tasks with zero tools. I asked why they wouldn't just use the lighter/knife/kit in their pocket or stashed on their PFD, and the answer was because they had practically ZERO on body gear.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why

Post by Woods Walker » Wed Nov 02, 2016 8:51 pm

RonnyRonin wrote:
Close_enough wrote: You always keep critical items on your body..... That goes without saying.
Not in many circles. I remember a discussion I had about the need or lack of need for primitive skills with someone who had recently been above the arctic circle on a kayaking trip, they cited rolling/falling out of a kayak as a need to be able to do various tasks with zero tools. I asked why they wouldn't just use the lighter/knife/kit in their pocket or stashed on their PFD, and the answer was because they had practically ZERO on body gear.
I remember an episode of I shouldn't been so careless.....oops I mean I shouldn't be alive in which an older man and his 30s year old son lost all their gear getting sucked under the ice when rafting during the melt which is a no go. The son dropped a lighter when packing the boat then put it in his pocket by chance. That move saved their lives. I always keep a lighter or firesteel in my pocket just incase. Though nothing is 100 percent in life.

That said I would hate to have my back against the wall needing to spin a coal or die. That wold suck.

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I also have my DIY re purposesd empty BIC fired starting clip on thing. Made a few of them and tested it in a man in the creek scenario.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by quazi » Wed Nov 02, 2016 11:56 pm

Another reason might be something along the lines of there not being enough room for you and your backpack in the truck/boat/rescue helicopter.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by taipan821 » Thu Nov 03, 2016 12:09 am

I regularly ditch my gear while on searches for the following reasons

- It can't fit in the troopie, so goes in the trailer
- I need more mobility, usually to get in/down/up/on something to rescue someone
- if I don't need everything (searching an urban environment doesn't need a survival kit)
- If I am in a small aircraft (gear gets left behind or put in the cargo hold)
- If I need to rapidly change roles (communications, first aid, chainsaw, etc)

and when it all hits the fan and all hands on deck

outside of Emergency Response, I only ditch my gear in lighting storms (metal, lightning strikes, tall guy doesn't want a helping hand to get killed)
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by ROCK6 » Thu Nov 03, 2016 12:19 pm

Woods Walker wrote:There is an interesting bush panic phenomena in which the lost person panics tossing their kit in hopes of increasing their speed to get out of the situation faster. In every case I read that did not end well. I guess a fire or immediate threat to life could be a reason aka the bag is in the other side of the house which is burning. I have an E&E plus the green bag of survival to counter this issue aka times I am separated from the primary or host pack
It's not really a phenomena, it is a commonly trained TTP (tactic, technique and procedure). Whether it's incoming (yeah, not likely), or an ambush (more likely), you drop your ruck and either attack or break-contact. There has always been the philosophy of having "lines" of gear where Line-1 is what is on your person (aka EDC); Line-2 is your fighting gear and Line-3 is your sustainment gear or ruck/pack. Our Line-1 was typically some basic survival items, but our Line-2 included not only our fighting load, but often a basic E&E kit with the purpose of surviving the elements if you survive the attack or successfully break contact; or, even if you're doing a recon or scouting an unknown area and you want to be light and quiet.

Everything of course is situational and it's all about identifying the "battle drills" and rehearsing them. What I can tell you is that if you have to break contact you will charge up a 50-degree, heavily vegetated hill with your pack only once :mrgreen: It's not about "losing or ditching" your pack, it's about saving your life or cutting cumbersome weight to successfully break contact or counterattack if needed.

Part of one's training needs to ensure they can survive (even if just short term) without their pack. It comes back to skills, minimalist on-hand tools (EDC?) and hopefully staying fully operational (avoiding mechanical injuries or the effects of an attack) to solve the problem of combating the elements or E&Eing to a place of safety. I think another aspect (from a "tactical") perspective, is that people don't conduct proper reconnaissance. If you suspect a danger area, heightened threat, major obstacle, choke point, etc., you drop your pack and cache or hide it while you scout out the targeted area. If you run into trouble you can't handle, you break contact and E&E back to your pack...living to fight another day or flee from the area. Again, it's very situational, but running full speed off-trail with a heavy pack is asking for a serious mechanical injury; you have a better chance of recovering your pack than you do surviving a threat with a mechanical injury or ventilated from a kinetic engagement.

Even from a more recreational perspective, I have used a RIBZ or detachable shoulder or lumbar pack (much like your dock-n-lock with the Kifaru E&E). More recently, it's a smaller HPG Kit Bag. My on-body gear doesn't really address shelter outside of my worn clothing, but I can improvise that. A collapsible water bottle and a dozen purification tablets handle my other biggest issue with the minimalist approach when trying to keep the distance backpacking kit weight down.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by zantra » Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:24 pm

humans are by far the more likely and the much more dangerous threat, no matter where you are. Dogs run a close second. But I dont see running as being the answer, even vs bear. they can outrun you (easily). So a swift use of your firearm and multiple shots at the brain are the best answer to an animal problem (if its bigger than a small dog, anyway). you dont need a heavy pack. Mine totals just 40 lbs, including rifle, pistol, 5 lbs of soft armor and a gallon of water. I might dump most of the water, if I knew I could easily replace it, but I wont abandon my gear, assuming that it's shtf. I would not be out there (with a pack) if it were not shtf, other than to occasionally practice a bugout. Your stuff needs to be mostly buried at your BOL, not on your back. If I were pressed really hard, Id consider removing and caching the armor (maybe). and I wouldn't have the armor if it were not shtf. So basically, the pack is 20 lbs if there's no rifle, armor or lots of water. If you can't run like hell with a 20 lb pack, best get to training.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by taipan821 » Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:34 pm

zantra wrote:humans are by far the more likely and the much more dangerous threat, no matter where you are. Dogs run a close second. But I dont see running as being the answer, even vs bear. they can outrun you (easily). So a swift use of your firearm and multiple shots at the brain are the best answer to an animal problem (if its bigger than a small dog, anyway). you dont need a heavy pack. Mine totals just 40 lbs, including rifle, pistol, 5 lbs of soft armor and a gallon of water. I might dump most of the water, if I knew I could easily replace it, but I wont abandon my gear, assuming that it's shtf. I would not be out there (with a pack) if it were not shtf, other than to occasionally practice a bugout. Your stuff needs to be mostly buried at your BOL, not on your back. If I were pressed really hard, Id consider removing and caching the armor (maybe). and I wouldn't have the armor if it were not shtf. So basically, the pack is 20 lbs if there's no rifle, armor or lots of water. If you can't run like hell with a 20 lb pack, best get to training.
1. 40 pounds is really heavy,
2. ditching gear should always be considered...what if you have to go swimming with that 40 pounds?
3. 20 pounds is still heavy. unless you are an active serving soldier no one would be willing to run with 20 pounds, also, what if you have to go swimming.
4. guns aren't the answer to everything...no matter how much you yanks love them. you are correct, sometimes running isn't the answer (isn't playing dead the best defence against bear attack...or is it pepper spray? both are lighter than a gun)
5. again you are right about the most dangerous foe being human...so if you stay away from traditional human routes you shouldn't have a problem.

oh...and apparently you take all 40 pounds of guns, ammo, water, food, body armour when you need to go and take a dump?
I personally don't mind ditching my gear if I need to go swimming, need greater mobility to help someone, using the gear...or taking a dump.
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Tropical Cyclone Marcia: Category 5 landfall 2015
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Zimmy
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by Zimmy » Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:52 pm

I keep 3 bags in my vehicle. A GHB, a very comprehensive tool bag, and my SHTF bag with a ton of diverse stuff in it.

If I had to "Escape from Dallas or Die" without my faithful vehicle, I'd build the load for the mission parameters into one bag and ditch the other two with the car. I couldn't carry it all 75 miles anyway. I never planned to.

As for just running off with nothing, that would be very bizarre circumstances.
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by BloodLust » Wed Mar 08, 2017 11:06 am

Been a while, olaf_yahoo.

I pick weather hazard. Being a near equatorial sea level tropical country, typhoons and floods are the top concern.
I have a main family BOB in a rolling suitcase. Personal BOB (whibdh also has a n E&E kit). EDC. GHB in the car.
I'm in a deep urban setting so human aggressor is next in line.
Erik wrote:First of all, I doubt your body is a weapon and if you threatened me with your body, I'd pull out a real weapon and see which is more effective.
Bear_B wrote: I am not too worried about the bullet with my name on it... its the bullets flying around with question marks on them that worry me.

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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by drop bear » Thu Mar 09, 2017 6:00 am


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moab
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Re: "Ditching" your BOB or any other bag and why.

Post by moab » Sun Mar 12, 2017 10:51 am

ROCK6 wrote:
Woods Walker wrote:There is an interesting bush panic phenomena in which the lost person panics tossing their kit in hopes of increasing their speed to get out of the situation faster. In every case I read that did not end well. I guess a fire or immediate threat to life could be a reason aka the bag is in the other side of the house which is burning. I have an E&E plus the green bag of survival to counter this issue aka times I am separated from the primary or host pack
It's not really a phenomena, it is a commonly trained TTP (tactic, technique and procedure). Whether it's incoming (yeah, not likely), or an ambush (more likely), you drop your ruck and either attack or break-contact. There has always been the philosophy of having "lines" of gear where Line-1 is what is on your person (aka EDC); Line-2 is your fighting gear and Line-3 is your sustainment gear or ruck/pack. Our Line-1 was typically some basic survival items, but our Line-2 included not only our fighting load, but often a basic E&E kit with the purpose of surviving the elements if you survive the attack or successfully break contact; or, even if you're doing a recon or scouting an unknown area and you want to be light and quiet.

Everything of course is situational and it's all about identifying the "battle drills" and rehearsing them. What I can tell you is that if you have to break contact you will charge up a 50-degree, heavily vegetated hill with your pack only once :mrgreen: It's not about "losing or ditching" your pack, it's about saving your life or cutting cumbersome weight to successfully break contact or counterattack if needed.

Part of one's training needs to ensure they can survive (even if just short term) without their pack. It comes back to skills, minimalist on-hand tools (EDC?) and hopefully staying fully operational (avoiding mechanical injuries or the effects of an attack) to solve the problem of combating the elements or E&Eing to a place of safety. I think another aspect (from a "tactical") perspective, is that people don't conduct proper reconnaissance. If you suspect a danger area, heightened threat, major obstacle, choke point, etc., you drop your pack and cache or hide it while you scout out the targeted area. If you run into trouble you can't handle, you break contact and E&E back to your pack...living to fight another day or flee from the area. Again, it's very situational, but running full speed off-trail with a heavy pack is asking for a serious mechanical injury; you have a better chance of recovering your pack than you do surviving a threat with a mechanical injury or ventilated from a kinetic engagement.

Even from a more recreational perspective, I have used a RIBZ or detachable shoulder or lumbar pack (much like your dock-n-lock with the Kifaru E&E). More recently, it's a smaller HPG Kit Bag. My on-body gear doesn't really address shelter outside of my worn clothing, but I can improvise that. A collapsible water bottle and a dozen purification tablets handle my other biggest issue with the minimalist approach when trying to keep the distance backpacking kit weight down.

ROCK6
We used to call them "harbor sites". Like in safe harbor. I assume. lol. We'd hide our packs and heavy gear at a known location. Scout out the area or perform whatever mission. And then return to the harbor site to get our bags. It's a very effective strategy.

But in terms of backpacking. I think it's really just a contingency plan. You can be hysterical about back up plans. But I think it's a good idea to keep certain survival items on your body, in a fannypack or chest rig (or in my case both) and then more advanced items in your main pack. There are enough reasons to ditch or lose your main pack to have these contingencies. IMHO.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

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